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August 18, 1991
Barbara Aiello, founder and president of the Kids on the Block puppets, was a top winner in the International Platform Association's Speaking Ladder Competition. The Westminster resident competed against 72 participants.*Barbara E. Walvoorod, writing and media professor at Loyola College, has published a new book, "Thinking and Writing in College," in conjunction with UMBC professor Lucille Parkinson McCarthy.*Amelie Chai of Salisbury has been awarded the Chesapeake Bay Chapter of the American Institute of Architects 1991-'92 Scholarship.
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NEWS
March 11, 2004
Unexpectedly on January 19, 2004, CHANTAL RUTH LOOMIS, age 27, passed away. Beloved daughter of Lawrence and Arlette Loomis; loving sister to Jeremy; granddaughter to Henrietta Cohen and loving relative and friend to many others. Chantal was a very gifted artist whose sensitivity and humanity were beautifully expressed in all of her work and relationships with others. She was a graduate of Centennial High School and The Rhode Island School of Design, and was currently studiying design at the Pratt Institute in New York City.
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NEWS
March 11, 2004
Unexpectedly on January 19, 2004, CHANTAL RUTH LOOMIS, age 27, passed away. Beloved daughter of Lawrence and Arlette Loomis; loving sister to Jeremy; granddaughter to Henrietta Cohen and loving relative and friend to many others. Chantal was a very gifted artist whose sensitivity and humanity were beautifully expressed in all of her work and relationships with others. She was a graduate of Centennial High School and The Rhode Island School of Design, and was currently studiying design at the Pratt Institute in New York City.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | March 16, 2003
A Memorable Place A London refresher course in design SPECIAL TO THE SUN By Bennard Perlman From my earliest visit to London, the River Thames has always served as a magnet that draws me to it. As a professional artist, I have painted it many times: the Houses of Parliament and Big Ben appearing in its ripple-altered reflection, the rows of benches occupied by tired strollers or individuals who, like myself, are simply mesmerized by the view, the...
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | August 11, 1993
The Maryland Institute, College of Art may be the nation's first art school to market itself in CD form: Last month, it mailed almost 11,000 compact-disc cases containing information about the college to high school art students around the country.Each year the college -- rated this year by U.S. News and World Report as one of the nation's top four art schools -- sends material to a selection of high school students who've indicated an interest in pursuing fine arts on their PSAT tests.The new promotional package, "Music 4 The Eyes," contains a packet with examples of student art and students' thoughts about their work ("Art is the hands and the sense that connects them," "Art is a perfect form of focus")
NEWS
October 15, 1995
Akil NelsonSchool: Hammond High SchoolHometown: ColumbiaAge: 17Akil, a senior at Hammond, has a grade-point average of 3.0. He has been on the principal's honor roll for three years and has received academic honors from the Black Student Association. As a junior he carried a 3.8 GPA.Akil's interests are mostly in art and fashion design. As a freshman, he participated in the school art club. He has had his artwork hung in The Mall in Columbia.As a sophomore, Akil lettered in outdoor track.
FEATURES
By Cox News Service | December 30, 1990
NORTH KINGSTOWN, R.I. -- Tage Frid lives in a museum of his own making.The modern, cedar-sided house where the great woodworker and his wife, Emma, live sits well back from the street, secluded from neighbors by tall stands of trees. Inside, there are five pieces of furniture Mr. Frid didn't make: two sofas, an antique desk, an antique crib and a round, lathe-turned stool made by a student. Everything else came from his shop -- even the kitchen cabinets and the bathroom medicine cabinets.
NEWS
March 15, 1993
Mohini TadikondaSchool: Glenelg Country SchoolAge: 18Hometown: ClarksvilleHer accomplishments: She has been the editor of the literary arts magazine, Appoggiatura, a 50-page booklet featuring students' artwork, poetry and writings. "It started out as some pages stapled together, and now it's a really nice magazine," she said. She's a member of the National Honor Society and the math club, Mu Alpha Theta. She's also a member of the Community Service Club. She's involved with drama at her school and has been in such productions as "Twelve Angry Men" and "Childhood."
NEWS
November 25, 1990
Dr. W. Montague Cobb, a former president of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and faculty member at Howard University Medical School for 45 years, died Tuesday at George Washington University Hospital in Washington, where he had been treated for heart problems and pneumonia. He was 86. An amateur violinist and historian who once estimated that he had helped train more than 6,000 physicians as a teacher of anatomy, Dr. Cobb wrote more than 600 scientific papers in a career that saw service on many scientific and government committees.
FEATURES
By N.Y. Times | October 8, 1992
Carmelo Pomodoro, a rising talent as an international designer in the fashion industry, died on Oct. 1 at St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center in Manhattan. He was 37 years old and lived in Cornwall, Conn.He died of AIDS-related pneumonia, said an announcement from his company, Carmelo Pomodoro, Ltd.Mr. Pomodoro gained recognition in the early 1980s as one of the leaders in a new generation of designers, and his career grew steadily.In 1981, when he was just 26, he showed his first full collection at his Manhattan apartment.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | August 22, 2002
Benjamin C. Thompson, an architect who collaborated with Maryland developer James W. Rouse to invent the festival marketplace, died of heart disease Saturday at his home in Cambridge, Mass. He was 84. Mr. Thompson founded Benjamin Thompson and Associates, the design firm that worked with Maryland's Rouse Co. to create Faneuil Hall Marketplace, a shopping and entertainment center inside historic buildings near Boston's waterfront. He and Mr. Rouse went on to collaborate on four more waterfront projects aimed at revitalizing urban centers -- Harborplace in Baltimore, South Street Seaport in lower Manhattan, Bayside Marketplace in Miami and Jacksonville Landing in Jacksonville, Fla. What made them different from suburban malls was that they were all near the city center and had no large anchor department stores.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | January 25, 2000
Jan Howard, a curator in the department of prints, drawings and photographs at the Baltimore Museum of Art, will leave her post here Jan. 31 to take a new job as head of the department of prints, drawings and photographs at the museum of the Rhode Island School of Design in Providence. "I'll have more opportunities to work with contemporary artists, which is what I love most about my job," Howard said. "I have had a great experience here at the BMA, but I am looking forward to working in a university environment and to the new challenges that it will present.
NEWS
August 7, 1999
SHE HAS BEEN called a revolutionary and a liberator. Yet few today know the name Claire McCardell.Walk into a department store, though, and "McCardellisms" fill the racks -- in pedal pushers, wraparound dresses, hoods, spaghetti straps and revealing swimwear. McCardell, a Frederick native, was author of the "American look" for women.She was born in 1905 and showed her fancy for fashion early, making paper dolls from women's magazine photos and designing her dresses with the help of the family's seamstress.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | July 20, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Friedrich St. Florian, the former dean of the Rhode Island School of Design, may have won a slice of immortality by designing the $100 million World War II Memorial planned for the National Mall.As the American Battle Monuments Commission sets out to garner support for his controversial design, the tale of the Austrian-born St. Florian seems distinctly American, a rags-to-riches fable of a dreamer whose biggest dream could become the symbol of this country's involvement in the greatest conflict of the 20th century.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | February 18, 1996
High Noon on Estreet.The tall, dark stranger gets off the train at the north end of town. Squinting at the bright sun, he heads south, passing the opera house and theater on his right. Down Estreet a few more blocks, he strolls into the saloonNow change Estreet to Charles Street between Penn Station and the Belvedere. The opera house is the Lyric, the theater is the Theatre Project on West Preston Street. The saloon is the Owl Bar.And the School of Communications Design at the University of Baltimore has made it possible to walk along with the stranger if we have a computer, a modem and access to the Internet.
NEWS
October 15, 1995
Akil NelsonSchool: Hammond High SchoolHometown: ColumbiaAge: 17Akil, a senior at Hammond, has a grade-point average of 3.0. He has been on the principal's honor roll for three years and has received academic honors from the Black Student Association. As a junior he carried a 3.8 GPA.Akil's interests are mostly in art and fashion design. As a freshman, he participated in the school art club. He has had his artwork hung in The Mall in Columbia.As a sophomore, Akil lettered in outdoor track.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | August 22, 2002
Benjamin C. Thompson, an architect who collaborated with Maryland developer James W. Rouse to invent the festival marketplace, died of heart disease Saturday at his home in Cambridge, Mass. He was 84. Mr. Thompson founded Benjamin Thompson and Associates, the design firm that worked with Maryland's Rouse Co. to create Faneuil Hall Marketplace, a shopping and entertainment center inside historic buildings near Boston's waterfront. He and Mr. Rouse went on to collaborate on four more waterfront projects aimed at revitalizing urban centers -- Harborplace in Baltimore, South Street Seaport in lower Manhattan, Bayside Marketplace in Miami and Jacksonville Landing in Jacksonville, Fla. What made them different from suburban malls was that they were all near the city center and had no large anchor department stores.
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | September 4, 1994
If you're more than casually interested in interior design, you've probably wondered what the homes and workplaces of well-known designers look like. Such curiosity is only natural, even when it involves something other than a quest for purely technical information.In general, I find, designers do indeed style their private spaces in accordance with their public philosophies. But the look of these homes and studios is often more than a mere expression of a certain school of design. The added element is the personal touch, or those sets of gestures that make an interior unique.
NEWS
February 23, 1995
Leonard J. MeyerRed Cross directorLeonard J. Meyer, who retired 33 years ago as director of Caribbean operations for the American Red Cross, died of leukemia at his home in Arnold on Monday.Mr. Meyer, who was 98, retired in 1962 after four years in Panama. He had joined the Red Cross at the start of World War II and had been a field director at East Coast posts.Born in Baltimore, he completed high school and a year of college at Mount St. Joseph College in Irvington, now a high school.He then entered the University of Maryland law school, where his studies were interrupted by World War I service as an Army officer in a machine gun battalion.
FEATURES
By Elsa Klensch | December 22, 1994
Q: My husband is throwing a big dinner dance to celebrate our silver wedding anniversary. He is a very attractive man, and after 25 years of marriage the women still go after him. I want to look absolutely drop-dead but can't make up my mind what color I should wear. Any suggestion?A: The three colors that make for drop-dead entrances are white, pink and red. These also flatter and enhance most women's complexions.In Milan, Giorgio Armani went for white. He says it is most alluring for evening:"White can be mysterious as well as modern.
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