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NEWS
March 2, 1995
Power to the states? It's a snappy war cry, but apply the principle to the federal school lunch and breakfast programs, as House Republicans are saying they want to do, and the concept loses steam.Last week, a House committee voted to repeal these programs, replacing them with nutritional block grants to the states -- a proposal that may sound good initially but is likely to be far more inefficient than the current programs.Republicans characterize the federal school meals programs as yet another bloated federal behemoth ripe for trimming.
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NEWS
By Cathy Demeroto | September 10, 2012
Hunger and obesity are serious challenges that face far too many children in our state and across the country. At a quick glance, it may seem that attempts to reduce hunger and promote healthy eating are competing goals. Yet, evidence shows us that expanding participation in federal nutrition programs (like school meals) reduces childhood hunger and improves children's diets. At the same time, improving the quality of these federal programs, with a primary goal of preventing obesity, may well increase participation.
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NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Evening Sun Staff Robert Hilson Jr. contributed to this story | September 24, 1991
Math class can be tough when your stomach is grumbling."If children don't eat, they can't learn," said Julie Ayers, a spokeswoman for the Maryland Food Committee, an anti-hunger group. "The equation is that simple."That's why the committee has joined forces with state and local officials to tout the importance of school breakfasts and lunches.The school meals campaign began today with events in five communities around the state, including Baltimore."It's a way of letting people know about school meals," said Linda Van Rooy, an official with the state Department of Education's nutrition and transportation service.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2012
Until this year, the only items that resembled produce on Blessin Giraldo's school lunch tray were berry-flavored Popsicles and Fruit Roll-Ups. But now, the Baltimore eighth-grader's tray features beds of greens and fruits and vegetables that are available at her middle school through a salad bar option that is sprouting up in school cafeterias around the city. "I can go to lunch now and know I won't leave without eating," said Blessin, who attends the Baltimore Leadership School for Young Women.
NEWS
April 22, 2008
With justified concern about childhood obesity and the economic plight of some of Maryland's 12,000 farms, it's a shame that more local produce hasn't gotten to local schools. But a new program for the next school year rightly aims to help by adding more Maryland farm products to school meals. It's not for lack of trying or interest that produce, dairy and other locally grown fare is scarce in school cafeterias. Many schools simply don't have the kitchen capacity to process and cook large amounts of food.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Evening Sun Staff | October 25, 1991
Children around the state will pay twice as much for a reduced-price school lunch and three times as much for a reduced-price breakfast starting Nov. 1, a direct result of state budget cuts.That means that low-income children who qualify for the program will pay 40 cents for a reduced-price lunch, and 30 cents for a reduced-price breakfast.The much larger free-meal program for the poorest students is not affected.It is the first increase in the reduced-price meal program since 1987, and is expected to force some poor students out of the program.
NEWS
By Cathy Demeroto | September 10, 2012
Hunger and obesity are serious challenges that face far too many children in our state and across the country. At a quick glance, it may seem that attempts to reduce hunger and promote healthy eating are competing goals. Yet, evidence shows us that expanding participation in federal nutrition programs (like school meals) reduces childhood hunger and improves children's diets. At the same time, improving the quality of these federal programs, with a primary goal of preventing obesity, may well increase participation.
EXPLORE
October 17, 2011
On Oct. 19, four classes of students from Ridge Ruxton School in Towson were scheduled to attend a special performance at the Hippodrome Theatre of "A Gazillion Bubbles. " The production has been created especially for autistic students. More than 600 students and staff from area schools will be in attendance at the production. Rodgers Forge students celebrate annual Generations Day The 11th annual Generation's Day event will be held at Rodgers Forge Elementary School on Thursday, Oct. 20, from 8:50 to 10: a.m. for students in grades one, four and five, and from 10 to 11:10 a.m. for children in kindergarten and grades two and three.
NEWS
January 30, 2012
I was delighted to read the newU.S. Department of Agricultureguidelines requiring schools to serve meals with twice as many fruits and vegetables, more whole grains, less sodium and fat, and no meat for breakfast ("Taterless tots," Aug. 24, 2011). The guidelines were mandated by the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act signed by President Obama in December of 2010 and will go into effect with the next school year. The new guidelines offer a welcome change from the USDA's tradition of using the National School Lunch Program as a dumping ground for meat and dairy surpluses.
NEWS
September 1, 1991
The Carroll County Board of Education has announced its policy for free and reduced price meals, and if applicable, free milk.The following household size income criteria will be used to determine eligibility. Based on the size of the family and annual income, students may qualify for either free meals or milk or reduced price meals.* One person: $8,606 for free meals; $12,247 for reduced.* Two people: $11,544 for free meals; $16,428 for reduced.* Three people: $14,482 for free meals; $20,609 for reduced.
NEWS
January 30, 2012
I was delighted to read the newU.S. Department of Agricultureguidelines requiring schools to serve meals with twice as many fruits and vegetables, more whole grains, less sodium and fat, and no meat for breakfast ("Taterless tots," Aug. 24, 2011). The guidelines were mandated by the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act signed by President Obama in December of 2010 and will go into effect with the next school year. The new guidelines offer a welcome change from the USDA's tradition of using the National School Lunch Program as a dumping ground for meat and dairy surpluses.
EXPLORE
October 17, 2011
On Oct. 19, four classes of students from Ridge Ruxton School in Towson were scheduled to attend a special performance at the Hippodrome Theatre of "A Gazillion Bubbles. " The production has been created especially for autistic students. More than 600 students and staff from area schools will be in attendance at the production. Rodgers Forge students celebrate annual Generations Day The 11th annual Generation's Day event will be held at Rodgers Forge Elementary School on Thursday, Oct. 20, from 8:50 to 10: a.m. for students in grades one, four and five, and from 10 to 11:10 a.m. for children in kindergarten and grades two and three.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2011
The Anne Arundel County Board of Education considered on Wednesday policy revisions to the Citizen Advisory Committee, approved an increase in school meal prices and granted a request for five early-dismissal days next year for teacher professional development. The school system's office of school and family partnerships offered a first reading of a draft that outlined revisions to the countywide Citizen Advisory Committee structure. The committee is a state-mandated arm of the school board made up of county residents, including teachers and those with or without children in the school system, that advises the board on decisions affecting the system.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2011
Public schools in Maryland have increased the number of breakfasts provided to students over the past year, said an Anne Arundel County schools official Tuesday, as a national survey of teachers was released indicating that children regularly come to school hungry. Jodi Risse, supervisor for food and nutrition services for Anne Arundel County public schools, said that 25.6 million breakfasts were served, according to state Department of Education figures, up from 25.2 million the previous year.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2010
Brian Meshkin knew that he would likely earn a spot on Howard County's Board of Education well before the final votes were tallied. Friends of his three school-age children also knew, which is why shortly after Election Day they gave his kids a list of concerns to take home to their father. At the top of the list: cafeteria pizza. It has to be better. The current offering, they say, is horrible. Also, the kids want computers in every classroom, as opposed to being mainly in computer labs, and they encourage more computer activity embedded in the curriculum.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2010
When Howard County school officials launched a competition allowing students to concoct dishes to be included on the school menu, they probably didn't envision that the contest would ultimately lead to a trip to the White House. Yet a contingent led by culinary students and faculty from Atholton High School in Columbia visited recently, courtesy of an invitation that came about after an aide to first lady Michelle Obama read about the county's student "Top Chef" competition. In each of the past two years, the county's Food and Nutrition Department and family and consumer science teachers have sponsored the competition.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2010
When Howard County school officials launched a competition allowing students to concoct dishes to be included on the school menu, they probably didn't envision that the contest would ultimately lead to a trip to the White House. Yet a contingent led by culinary students and faculty from Atholton High School in Columbia visited recently, courtesy of an invitation that came about after an aide to first lady Michelle Obama read about the county's student "Top Chef" competition. In each of the past two years, the county's Food and Nutrition Department and family and consumer science teachers have sponsored the competition.
NEWS
July 28, 2004
Revised income rules are announced for school-meal aid The Howard County public school system has announced revised income-eligibility guidelines for free and reduced-price school meals. The guidelines are set by the federal government and adopted for children across the state. They are effective from July 1 this year through June 30 next year. Household size and income determine eligibility. A child in a family of two would be entitled to meal benefits if the household's annual income is less than $23,107; in a family of three, $28,990; in a family of four, $34,873.
NEWS
By Arnold Joo | January 6, 2010
Poverty in Baltimore, a serious problem in the best of times, has worsened with the current recession. A recent New York Times article on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program - what used to be called Food Stamps - states that 1 in 8 Americans and 1 in 4 children now participate. Here in Baltimore, as of Oct. 31, the public school system had 83.6 percent participation in the free and reduced price meals (FARM) program, an increase of 10 percentage points or 9,000 more students compared with the same date in 2008.
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