Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSchool Management
IN THE NEWS

School Management

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 10, 1992
As a concept, school-based management has been around for more than a decade. Practiced in various school systems around the country, including Prince George's and Montgomery counties, its record has been relatively good so far as experiments in public education go.So it may come as a surprise to Howard County residents, who pride themselves on innovation in their classrooms, that school-based management has never been tried in the county.Better late than never, at least. County school officials have announced plans to convert six schools to the concept on a pilot basis for five years.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | December 8, 2012
Who is Shawn Nowlin? Or perhaps we should be asking: Why can't the Baltimore school system answer that question? It's been almost two weeks since Nowlin, who worked in some still-undetermined capacity at a Baltimore elementary and middle school, was charged in the rape of a 15-year-old girl he supposedly was counseling but instead impregnated. Prosecutors in Harford County, where the 27-year-old Nowlin lives, said he identified himself as a vice principal or "dean of students" at Hazelwood Elementary/Middle School in Northeast Baltimore — an obviously ludicrous title unless you believe there are also provosts of the playground at this level of the education system.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jean Thompson and Jean Thompson,SUN STAFF | June 10, 1996
Only six months after Baltimore halted a controversial school privatization venture, state and city officials are preparing to award control of up to 10 schools each year to private firms.Eventually, more than 40 public schools may get new managers -- as well as changes in curriculums, programs and staff. Officials say they want to start with five to 10 schools, beginning in September 1997.They envision city schools run by groups as diverse as universities, parent associations, private schools and museums -- mostly nonprofit groups.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
Members of the Baltimore school police union cast a vote of "no confidence" in their police chief last month, pointing to what they said was his lack of responsiveness to their concerns, union leaders announced Thursday. In a letter addressed to city schools CEO Andrés Alonso, Sgt. Clyde E. Boatwright, president of the Fraternal Order of Police Lodge No. 5, said that between Oct. 14 and Oct. 21, 84 of 110 officers cast a vote of "no confidence" in Chief Marshall "Toby" Goodwin's ability to run the school system's police department.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | December 8, 2012
Who is Shawn Nowlin? Or perhaps we should be asking: Why can't the Baltimore school system answer that question? It's been almost two weeks since Nowlin, who worked in some still-undetermined capacity at a Baltimore elementary and middle school, was charged in the rape of a 15-year-old girl he supposedly was counseling but instead impregnated. Prosecutors in Harford County, where the 27-year-old Nowlin lives, said he identified himself as a vice principal or "dean of students" at Hazelwood Elementary/Middle School in Northeast Baltimore — an obviously ludicrous title unless you believe there are also provosts of the playground at this level of the education system.
NEWS
By From staff report | February 9, 1998
The State Department of Education is operating a toll-free hot line for parents, teachers and staff members from the 29 low-performing schools in Baltimore that were added to the list of schools in need of state supervision.The number is 1-888-246-0016, and it operates from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays.State officials also added nine schools in Prince George's County to the list Jan. 28. The 38 schools need special attention and must follow a state schedule for submitting improvement plans and getting started on those planned changes in school management and curriculum.
NEWS
May 17, 1996
IF GOV. Parris N. Glendening is serious about supporting school reforms and improving the dismal situation in Baltimore City classrooms, he should sign a bill now opposed by Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke that imposes a financial penalty on city educators for resisting management changes recommended by consultants four years ago.This bill sends a strong message that city leaders will be held accountable for failure to improve school operations. The mayor agreed to provisions of this bill at a meeting with the governor and legislative leaders.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff writer | December 30, 1990
Nearly a year after the state attorney general barred the County Commissioners from seeking an independent audit of school management, the board may field a request from the schools to finance a similar audit.The county school administration is expected to recommend next month that the Board of Education hire the Baltimore firm of Arthur Anderson & Co. to conduct a management audit of the finance and personnel departments and aspects of data processing.But because the board did not budget money for the proposed audit in its current $100 million operating budget, board members are likely to ask the commissioners to pay the $44,800 cost.
NEWS
July 1, 1991
The first rule of good management is, choose a competent person to run the organization, then give that person wide latitude in choosing the people who will help to achieve the goal.Whatever else may be said of the new school-management team the Baltimore school board has chosen, that basic rule was not followed. The board in effect chose three superintendents, and designated one of them first among equals.That said, Superintendent-designate Walter G. Amprey seems comfortable with the deputies the board chose for him, and there is no reason the unusual arrangement won't work.
NEWS
By Jean Thompson and Jean Thompson,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1996
Taking the first step toward a proposed reorganization of Baltimore school government, officials this week created committees to plan the changeover and screen candidates for a new city school board.A transition committee representing the governor, the mayor and the state school board will lead the way, according to a recent settlement of city-state disputes over school management and funding.Walter Sondheim, a state school board member and a former city school board president, will serve as the group's chairman, city and state officials announced yesterday.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to The Sun | December 27, 2006
As teacher, coach and athletic director at Howard High School, Vince Parnell worked long hours and often found himself juggling competing priorities. Most mornings, he would arrive at school between 5:45 and 6:15 to prepare for the social studies classes he taught that day. Then he would stay after school to coach football, girls' basketball or track. And, as athletic director for the school, he was responsible for scheduling buses to away games and taking money at the gate for home games.
NEWS
By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV | July 23, 2006
The lure of more money, additional managerial responsibilities and an administrative label was enough to attract 27 applicants for the school system's new athletics and activities manager positions. The new position, which system officials say is a first in the state, was the result of high school administrators requesting more assistance so that they could devote more time to student-related issues in the school, said system spokeswoman Patti Caplan. Each of the county's high schools will have a manager.
NEWS
June 25, 2006
Ruth M. Pahl, a longtime cafeteria manager for Baltimore County schools, died Tuesday at Copper Ridge in Sykesville after a long battle with dementia. She was 84. Mrs. Pahl was a resident of Eldersburg for more than 25 years before her illness. Ruth M. Westgate was born in Baltimore, one of five children. She attended Baltimore County public schools and married Walter C. Pahl Sr., a Baltimore County firefighter, in 1941. Mr. Pahl died in 1993. Mrs. Pahl worked for 30 years in Baltimore County public schools cafeterias and retired from the cafeteria at Deer Park Middle School.
NEWS
December 16, 2004
Carroll G. Scroggins, former manager of special services facilities for Baltimore public schools, died Saturday of a cardiac arrest at Sinai Hospital. The Forest Park resident was 63. Mr. Scroggins was born in Baltimore, raised in Forest Park and graduated in 1959 from Douglass High School. He worked as a waiter for several years at the Woodholme Country Club, Suburban Club and Summit Country Club before taking a job with city public schools as a custodian in the early 1960s. Mr. Scroggins rose from custodian to manager of special services facilities.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | May 29, 2004
Vallen Luther Emery Sr., a retired city public schools transportation manager for disabled children who helped found a Northwest Baltimore church, died Monday of complications of cancer and heart failure at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Ashburton resident was 80. Born in Vacherie, La., and educated in New Orleans, Mr. Emery enrolled in Tuskegee Institute in 1941. He interrupted his studies to serve in the Army in the Pacific during World War II, serving as a staff sergeant in the medical corps.
NEWS
September 18, 2003
JUST HOW DIFFICULT is it to count the number of children enrolled in Baltimore public schools? The answer most often given doesn't add up: Too many children wander into city schools well after the first day of classes, for myriad sad, societal reasons, and their late admissions throw off school counts; principals have an incentive to wait for these children to turn up before committing to numbers that affect staff size and resources. But this isn't news, it's a well-known fact of urban schooling for which better planning and forecasting are evidently necessary.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff writer | December 9, 1990
WESTMINSTER - The Carroll Board of Education is expected to give the go-ahead next month to a management audit that once sparked a bitter turf battle with the County Commissioners.The school administration will recommend that the board approve a $44,800 proposal from Arthur Anderson & Co. of Baltimore to review school management practices. The firm's bid was the lowest of five received.Plans for a more extensive performance review were first unveiled last fall in the midst of a feud between the school board and the County Commissioners over who should control the audit.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | August 24, 1998
When Carroll County's 36 public schools open for a new academic year today, some changes will be obvious.Linton Springs Elementary School will become more than a construction project as students fill the gleaming hallways and inaugurate the playground. Displaced Elmer A. Wolfe Elementary School students, who attended the old New Windsor Middle School for the past three years while their outdated school was being rebuilt, will find a new and improved home school.The county school system will welcome about 150 new teachers and more than 600 additional students this year, bringing enrollment to more than 26,000.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.