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By Meredith Schlow | January 29, 1992
Sussex Elementary School in Essex will be closed for six to eight weeks while asbestos is removed from the building and, beginning tomorrow, students will attend classes at five locations in the area, school officials have said.The school has been closed since Friday, when routine tests found higher-than-acceptable levels of asbestos fibers in the air. Subsequent tests showed that asbestos sprayed on steel beams in the roof has made its way into the building."We went in there [Monday] in a very aggressive mode, and used fans and a leaf-blower to really disturb the area," Keith D. Kelley, Baltimore County's assistant superintendent for facilities, said yesterday.
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NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,jill.rosen@baltsun.com | September 29, 2009
Roscoe, a tan puggle, yelps plaintively from inside a crate, doing his best impersonation of a dog in need. He yips alongside a blue-eyed husky, a schnauzer named Scoobie and, across the room, a guinea pig and a ferret - all supposedly just rescued from a disaster. For the first time ever in the state, if there would be a flood or a tornado or something that caused a mass evacuation in Baltimore County, people and their pets have a shelter where they can stay together: Eastern Technical High School in Essex.
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NEWS
November 11, 2001
Baltimore County police were investigating a shooting at Orems Elementary School in Essex yesterday. According to police, a 14-year- old boy shot a female in the leg about 1:30 p.m. on the grounds of the school, 711 High Villa Road. The boy was in custody yesterday, and the victim - who was not identified and whose age was not released - was taken to Johns Hopkins Hospital, police said.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,SUN REPORTER | May 10, 2007
Teaching has taken Robin August to courtrooms, hospitals and cabins in the woods. But August, who was named Baltimore County Teacher of the Year yesterday, said that after nearly two decades of teaching, one venue remains beyond compare. "I can honestly say that the most exciting place teaching brings me is the classroom," August, who teaches math to sixth-graders at Deep Creek Middle School in Essex, said as she choked back tears during her acceptance speech. "When the lights come on, the bell rings and students enter the room, that's when my classroom comes alive.
NEWS
By Meredith Schlow | January 30, 1992
At least 300 angry parents of current and former students of Sussex Elementary School in Essex crowded into the cafeteria of another school last night and demanded answers about the future of their children's health from overwhelmed officials.Their concern arose from tests showing that levels of asbestos fiber in the air of at least one classroom at Sussex are 30 times what is considered acceptable.The Sussex school, in the 500 block of Woodward Drive, has been closed since last Friday. Testing revealed that asbestos sprayed on beams in the school's roof and walls had made its way into the 30-year-old building.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2002
An eighth-grader who took a loaded handgun to Deep Creek Middle School in Essex on Wednesday was charged as a juvenile yesterday and placed in a school for troubled youths. Cpl. Ronald Brooks, a Baltimore County police spokesman, said the boy, 14, was charged with possessing a deadly weapon. The boy was turned over to the state Department of Juvenile Justice, which placed him in the Charles H. Hickey Jr. School. Brooks said the pupil took the gun from his home in Essex to use it to scare a classmate who had been threatening him. "So far there is no indication he was actually going to use the firearm," Brooks said.
NEWS
February 4, 1992
Parents of the children at Sussex Elementary School in Essex are understandably worried. Late last month, officials closed the school after finding levels of asbestos fiber in a kindergarten classroom that were 30 times the amount considered acceptable. School officials' repeated attempts to allay fears are of little consolation: Parents, who know that related health problems do not show up for decades, have no idea whether their children were exposed to asbestos fibers and, if so, how much.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,SUN REPORTER | May 10, 2007
Teaching has taken Robin August to courtrooms, hospitals and cabins in the woods. But August, who was named Baltimore County Teacher of the Year yesterday, said that after nearly two decades of teaching, one venue remains beyond compare. "I can honestly say that the most exciting place teaching brings me is the classroom," August, who teaches math to sixth-graders at Deep Creek Middle School in Essex, said as she choked back tears during her acceptance speech. "When the lights come on, the bell rings and students enter the room, that's when my classroom comes alive.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | October 26, 1999
EMPLOYERS HAVE been complaining for quite a while now about the quality of the high school diploma.Too many of the young people who tote them into job interviews aren't literate, can't add a column of figures, don't know the first thing about comportment in the workplace and show up late or not at all.Meanwhile, teachers feel as though they are sending students out into the dark. They have only outdated information about the skills employers want, especially in the rapidly changing area of technology.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | April 26, 1996
Elected officials and a Baltimore County school board member are calling for a restructuring of the school system's inflexible expulsion policy, after the dismissal of an honor student-athlete who inadvertently carried pepper spray into school."
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Tanika White and Sara Neufeld and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | June 17, 2004
Little more than a dozen years ago, Eastern Vocational-Technical High School in Essex was preparing its students to head straight to work, fixing cars, maybe, or styling hair. Today, with Vocational long since dropped, Eastern Tech has something else attached to its name: the highest 10th-grade reading score in the state. Blue-collar Essex, drained by a steady loss of manufacturing jobs, has demonstrated how possibility can grow out of pain. "We're used to seeing this in the richest school," said Rita Norman, whose daughter Jasmine is finishing her freshman year at Eastern Tech, in Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Stephanie Shapiro and By Peter Jensen and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | May 19, 2002
Keep dreams alive, despite the detours Elton Elizabeth Keith Class of 1996 Patterson High School Elton Elizabeth Keith didn't allow a major detour to prevent her from becoming the "triple threat" she has envisioned since childhood. Today, Keith, trained as a singer, dancer and actor, is continuously involved in local theater productions, while teaching music at two Baltimore elementary schools. Keith's path to the stage took an unexpected turn after eighth grade. She had always assumed that she would attend the Baltimore School for the Arts.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2002
An eighth-grader who took a loaded handgun to Deep Creek Middle School in Essex on Wednesday was charged as a juvenile yesterday and placed in a school for troubled youths. Cpl. Ronald Brooks, a Baltimore County police spokesman, said the boy, 14, was charged with possessing a deadly weapon. The boy was turned over to the state Department of Juvenile Justice, which placed him in the Charles H. Hickey Jr. School. Brooks said the pupil took the gun from his home in Essex to use it to scare a classmate who had been threatening him. "So far there is no indication he was actually going to use the firearm," Brooks said.
NEWS
November 11, 2001
Baltimore County police were investigating a shooting at Orems Elementary School in Essex yesterday. According to police, a 14-year- old boy shot a female in the leg about 1:30 p.m. on the grounds of the school, 711 High Villa Road. The boy was in custody yesterday, and the victim - who was not identified and whose age was not released - was taken to Johns Hopkins Hospital, police said.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | October 26, 1999
EMPLOYERS HAVE been complaining for quite a while now about the quality of the high school diploma.Too many of the young people who tote them into job interviews aren't literate, can't add a column of figures, don't know the first thing about comportment in the workplace and show up late or not at all.Meanwhile, teachers feel as though they are sending students out into the dark. They have only outdated information about the skills employers want, especially in the rapidly changing area of technology.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN STAFF | June 11, 1997
What happens when you're in charge of a little city, a place with 1,400 teen-agers, 140 adults, a three-story brick building with 78 classrooms on 44 acres, where a loud bell rings every 50 minutes, hordes jam hallways, lockers slam, phones ring every second -- and suddenly everybody's gone?If you're E. Diane Goldian, principal of Kenwood High School in Essex, you get up at 4: 30 a.m., as usual. Instead of your usual skirt and jacket, you slip on a pair of cutoff denim shorts and a T-shirt that says "South Pacific," from a school musical.
NEWS
By Meredith Schlow YzB | January 29, 1992
Sussex Elementary School in Essex will be closed for six to eight weeks while asbestos is removed from the building and, beginning tomorrow, students will attend classes at five locations in the area, school officials said yesterday.The school has been closed since Friday, when routine tests found higher-than-acceptable levels of asbestos fibers in the air. Subsequent tests showed that asbestos sprayed on steel beams in the roof has made its way into the building."We went in there [Monday]
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN STAFF | June 11, 1997
What happens when you're in charge of a little city, a place with 1,400 teen-agers, 140 adults, a three-story brick building with 78 classrooms on 44 acres, where a loud bell rings every 50 minutes, hordes jam hallways, lockers slam, phones ring every second -- and suddenly everybody's gone?If you're E. Diane Goldian, principal of Kenwood High School in Essex, you get up at 4: 30 a.m., as usual. Instead of your usual skirt and jacket, you slip on a pair of cutoff denim shorts and a T-shirt that says "South Pacific," from a school musical.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN STAFF | June 7, 1997
You can't avoid thinking about it on this day: Children grow up, life changes, people you love get new jobs, and it hurts."It's like they're dying. Or you're dying. I mean, our childhood is here," sobbed Amanda Marshall, 11, amid hugging and wailing fifth-graders at Middlesex Elementary School in Essex.Yesterday, they said goodbye to their beloved teacher for the past two years, their principal, their friends and the award-winning school that provided stability at times when families could not."
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | April 26, 1996
Elected officials and a Baltimore County school board member are calling for a restructuring of the school system's inflexible expulsion policy, after the dismissal of an honor student-athlete who inadvertently carried pepper spray into school."
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