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NEWS
July 19, 2010
The Baltimore City Council showed wisdom when it voted recently to restore funding for health centers in the city's public schools. Few investments are more beneficial in terms of preventing illness and making schools more conducive to learning. Fully funding the health centers is also an excellent way to welcome Baltimore's new health commissioner, who established her reputation running the health department for New York's 1.1 million-student school system. Funding for the city's 13 school health centers will come in part from additional revenue raised from new taxes.
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HEALTH
By Kym Byrnes, For The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
Students entering kindergarten and seventh grade in Maryland will have to add new shots to their lists of things to do before heading back to school this month. Vaccines required for all school-age children in Maryland include tetanus, diphtheria, polio, measles, mumps, rubella, hepatitis B, varicella (chickenpox), meningitis and pertussis (whooping cough). Under the new requirements, kindergarten pupils must get an additional dose of the chickenpox vaccine, which means kindergarten students will have a total of two chickenpox vaccines upon starting kindergarten.
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NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | August 16, 2000
Carroll County's experiment with teaching gun safety to public school students as part of the health program this year could become a model for others in Maryland. Little has been done statewide to teach children what to do if they find a gun or encounter one somewhere, said Ron Peiffer, Maryland's assistant superintendent for school and community outreach. In Carroll, a committee of school staff, working with crime victims and law-enforcement representatives, has devised a program for students from kindergarten to high school that deals with guns as a personal safety issue.
NEWS
November 1, 2013
Flu shots The Department of Health will provide free vaccinations. Nasal-spray vaccine is for healthy people age 2 to 49. It is not for pregnant women. The clinics also have the high-dose flu shots for people 65 years of age and older. Pneumococcal vaccine is also available. The following locations will provide vaccinations: •Glen Burnie Health Center, from 8:30 .m. to 11:30 a.m. and from 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Tuesdays and Fridays, 416 A Street, Glen Burnie 410-222-6633. •Parole Health Center, from 8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. and from 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays, 1950 Drew Street, Annapolis, 410-222-7247.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 27, 1996
Dr. John M. Krager, deputy director of the Baltimore County Department of Health, died Sunday of a heart attack at his Ruxton residence. He was 69.Dr. Krager joined the Health Department in 1965 as assistant health officer, director of the Bureau of Preventive Services and chief of the Division of School Health.Since 1991 he had been deputy director of the Health Department. He was acting health officer from late 1994 -- when Dr. Margaret L. Sherrard retired as director -- until August, when Dr. Michelle A. Leverett was appointed to the position.
NEWS
June 18, 2006
Officials seek leader for Health Council The Howard County public school system is accepting applications for the position of chair of the Howard County School Health Council. The council provides leadership and advice to the superintendent of schools and the health officer on developing and promoting school health programs. The executive committee meets four times yearly; the full committee also meets four times a year. Local school health councils are required by state law. Membership is drawn from the health, business, religious and volunteer communities, and includes parents and members of the school system and the Health Department.
NEWS
By Sue du Pont and Sue du Pont,SUN STAFF | August 26, 2002
ANNE ARUNDEL County school health staff are on the job preparing for the return of their students. For students, parents and teachers, it is an exciting, sometimes anxious time for which the health professionals are highly trained and qualified. The county Department of Health recently recognized school nurses, aides and support staff for their outstanding achievements in serving public school students during the past school year. Nearly 300 school health service professionals gathered at Kurtz's Beach in Pasadena for the department's first-ever breakfast awards program.
NEWS
May 21, 2000
Cookie dough logo contest could yield scholarship dough Jeanne's Gourmet Cookie Dough and Pretzels is offering a $1,000 scholarship to students 16 to 18 years old. Students must design an original character that depicts Jeanne's products or logo. The character will become the copyrighted property of Jeanne's Gourmet. In addition, the art department of the student's school will receive a $500 cash donation. Drawings must be submitted by May 30. Judging will take place in June, with the winner notified by July 15. Information: Jeanne's at 192 E. Main St., Westminster, or 410-751-2270or 800-665-2270.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2002
Dr. Margaret Sherrard Hamberry, retired director of the Baltimore County Health Department who planned and directed large-scale 1950s polio immunizations, died Thursday of ovarian cancer at her North Baltimore home. She was 78. An advocate for public health issues in the Baltimore County schools system, the Homeland resident retired in 1994 after 40 years with the Health Department. "She was the most honest, down-to-earth, pragmatic, common-sense individual you'd ever know," said Dr. J. David Nagel, an internist who lives in Butler.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2010
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake plans to announce Wednesday that Baltimore's next health commissioner will be a veteran public health official from New York City, one who began her life in the South Bronx projects but went on to attend Yale and train as a pediatrician. Oxiris Barbot was chosen from a list of more than 40 candidates to replace Joshua Sharfstein, who left last year to become principal deputy commissioner at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. For the past seven years, Barbot has served as the medical director of New York City's Office of School Health, a program run jointly by the health and education departments.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2013
State lawmakers are considering changing personnel laws for county health officers, following the messy and public firing of Anne Arundel's health officer earlier this year. "We need to move forward," Del. Joseline Pena-Melnyk told attendees of a meeting in Annapolis Wednesday of a group called the Caucus of African-American Leaders. Pena-Melnyk, a Democrat who represents Prince George's and Anne Arundel, said she'll seek to form a work group in the House of Delegates to review how health officers are hired and fired.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2013
Baltimore County health officials are investigating why about 200 students at Pot Spring Elementary in Timonium - a third of the children there - got sick with gastrointestinal symptoms last week. The school's principal alerted school health officials after an "unusually high" number of students were absent Friday and a large number of students went to the nurse's office complaining of vomiting, said Debbie Somerville, coordinator of health services for the county schools. Nine staff members also got sick.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Staff Writer Staff writer John W. Frece contributed to this article | September 22, 1993
A coalition of religious and anti-abortion groups yesterday accused the state Department of Education of trying to start school health clinics behind parents' backs.The Coalition for Parental Rights and Family Integrity charged that the clinics would distribute contraceptives and counsel children about birth control. By seeking funds from a private foundation to start the clinics, the coalition said, the state deliberately went around parents and legislators.But a Department of Education official said the group's criticism was premature and misinformed.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | January 28, 1998
A health clinic opened at Carter Godwin Woodson Elementary School yesterday in the belief that healthier students will have better success in school.Two corporations -- NationsBank and Helix Health -- have underwritten the school health center, through donations of staff time and money.The clinic targets students whose families have no health insurance and no pediatrician."We consider ourselves a safety net," said Gerry Waterfield, a city Health Department official who overseas the school health centers.
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