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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2012
Public school districts across Maryland can now apply for state funding to reduce their energy consumption as part of a new $25 million "green schools initiative," the Maryland Energy Administration announced Wednesday. The effort is meant to help "accelerate" the state's goal of reducing its overall energy consumption by 15 percent in the next three years, the administration said. The funding will come from the state's capital budget for schools planning, the administration said.
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NEWS
June 26, 2012
Harford County Executive David R. Craig misses the mark in his discussion of Maryland's Maintenance of Effort (MOE) law in his recent op-ed piece ("A school funding solution," June 21). Contrary to his arguments, the new law passed during the 2012 legislative session greatly enhances the ability of counties to fund a quality education for their children. As we entered the 2012 legislative session, loopholes in MOE were being widely exploited, severely jeopardizing the impressive gains in student achievement that our schools have made in recent years.
NEWS
By David R. Craig | June 20, 2012
Recently, Harford County engaged in a public conversation with its teachers about pay and classroom spending. This problem is not unique to Harford County and is symptomatic of a statewide problem caused by increased state mandates, lack of control over educational spending by the county's funding authorities and increased strain on public dollars in a down economy. On one side was the Harford County Education Association (HCEA), which represents the interests of teachers. They bemoaned that a county that is already spending half of every general fund dollar on K-12 education (this includes operating spending, debt service and other capital expenditures)
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2012
The Anne Arundel County Council approved a $1.2 billion annual operating budget Wednesday for the fiscal year that begins July 1. The budget, adopted 6-1, ends furloughs for county employees but does not include raises. For property owners, it creates approximately a 3-cent increase in the property tax rate, the maximum amount allowed by law. The coming year's 94.1-cent tax rate would mean, for example, that owner of a home assessed at $261,200 will pay about $128 more in property taxes, according to county finance officials.
NEWS
April 30, 2012
The State Board of Education was right to reject Anne Arundel County Executive John Leopold's attempt to evade the spirit of a law that prevents local jurisdictions from slacking off in their support for public schools. Protest though he might that he had done nothing wrong, Mr. Leopold's budget for the current fiscal year provided less money to support classroom education than in the year before, and had his effort been allowed to stand, that difference - amounting to about $12 million a year - would have been cemented into perpetuity.
NEWS
April 28, 2012
Data-stream around Grandpa, youngsters 2.1 and 3.1, while he tells you about the time long, long ago when a certain elected official grew so nostalgic about a time even longer ago when Labor Day marked the beginning of the school year. Way back in the last millenium, people always knew that public schools started the day after Labor Day. Why begin classes that Tuesday? Well, probably because the school calendar was based on the farm calendar and the growing season. It might also have just been a convenient date.
NEWS
April 19, 2012
No sooner had Anne Arundel County Executive John Leopold unveiled his proposed budget for next year than Superintendent Kevin Maxwell was complaining that the schools were being shortchanged by $12 million. It was the latest salvo in a long-running feud between the two men over what it really means for the county to maintain its state requirements for school funding. It's not entirely clear which one is right about the law. But what is clear is that the General Assembly was right to approve legislation this year adding specificity and teeth to its maintenance of effort law. The argument between Messrs.
NEWS
By Andrew Brownstein | April 16, 2012
For the casual visitor, it's easy to miss that Southeast High School in rural Kansas — once among the lowest academic performers in the state — is in the midst of a profound transformation. Like so many other Kansas schools, the building in Cherokee (population: 722) shows the telltale signs of a suffering economy. Bus routes have been cut, as have supplies. Custodians, secretaries and cafeteria workers took an eight-day pay cut. During the harsh winters, students bundle up to make it through classes where the temperature hovers at an uncomfortable, but cost-saving 68 degrees.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2012
Anne Arundel County residents would see their property taxes increase under the $1.2 billion budget proposed Monday by County Executive John R. Leopold, but that would be partially offset by a drop in trash pickup frequency and fees. County workers, meanwhile, would see an end to furloughs but receive no raises. Leopold's spending plan for the year that begins July 1 includes boosting the tax rate from 91 cents to 94.1 cents per $100 of assessed value. For a home with an assessed value of $261,200, the forecast countywide average, taxes would go up by about $128 for the year, officials said.
NEWS
April 9, 2012
Students who drop out before completing high school will have a harder time finding and keeping a job, and they will earn less money when they do. They will be more likely to spend time in prison, will be sicker and will die sooner than those with diplomas. And they will cost local, state and federal governments billions in increased social service costs. There was a time when it was possible to live a productive, middle class life without graduating from high school, but in the 21st Century, not even that will be sufficient.
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