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By Linda Linley and Linda Linley,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2002
An educator from California has been named director of the Jemicy School in Owings Mills, effective July 1. Benjamin Shifrin, 47, head of Emanuel Academy of Beverly Hills, will replace interim Director Mark Westervelt, a 28-year teacher at Jemicy School. Westervelt will be assistant director under Shifrin. Jemicy School is a private coeducational school for children with dyslexia. Founded in 1973, it was one of the first schools in the nation for children with dyslexia, a neurological condition that impairs the ability to recognize and comprehend the written word.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2013
It is doubtful in all of the hullabaloo and hype leading up to Super Bowl XLVII that the name of one non-football-playing Baltimorean will be mentioned: John McDonogh, the philanthropist, who left an indelible mark not only on his native city but also in New Orleans for his endowment of public schools for poor children. A reader, Bill Rowe, who graduated from McDonogh School in 1970, recently brought to my attention McDonogh's philanthropic endeavors, which probably outside of the McDonogh community have largely been forgotten.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Aaron Chester | October 25, 2007
Longtime singer and actress Liza Minnelli returns to Baltimore for the first time since the 1990s on Saturday. After releasing more than 20 albums, the award-winning Broadway performer recently released a DVD featuring some of her more recent work. Proceeds from the concert will go toward the Chimes School for children with disabilities. The performance is at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 1212 Cathedral St. Tickets are $53-$78. The concert starts at 7:30 p.m. Call 410-547-7328 or go to ticketmaster .com.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2011
Norbel School in Elkridge will officially close its doors for good Friday, but a group that includes former Norbel staff and parents are working to launch a similar school for students with learning differences, one that they hope will open in time for the new school year. It is a daunting task in a short time, and the group, which has held meetings since Norbel officials announced the school's closing, has not secured a facility. The group is working on gaining permission from the state to open a school and is also trying to secure nonprofit status.
NEWS
September 16, 2005
Two African-American children enrolled at the new Sunnyside Acres School near Glen Burnie in September 1955, marking one of the first steps toward public school integration in Anne Arundel County. Sunnyside Acres School was one of two public schools open to black and white students. The other, the Millersville School for children with cerebral palsy, did not receive applications for admission. Altogether, 45 children applied for admission to Sunnyside Acres but only 30 were accepted, because each of the three teachers could handle only 10 students.
NEWS
March 29, 2004
`Growin' Up Good' published by founder of Norbel School Norma Hauserman-Campbell, co-founder with her late husband, Robert L. Campbell, of the Norbel School in Elkridge, has published a book, Growin' Up Good: A humorous, common sense blueprint for raising your child to become a responsible, thoughtful, happy person. Hauserman-Campbell, who opened the school for children with learning disabilities almost 25 years ago, is now its director emeritus and grandmother of a Norbel student. Proceeds from sale of the book will benefit Norbel School.
NEWS
By Linda Linley and Linda Linley,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2002
An educator from California has been named director of the Jemicy School in Owings Mills, effective July 1. Benjamin Shifrin, 47, head of Emanuel Academy of Beverly Hills, will replace interim Director Mark Westervelt, a 28-year teacher at Jemicy School. Westervelt will be assistant director under Shifrin. Jemicy School is a private coeducational school for children with dyslexia. Founded in 1973, it was one of the first schools in the nation for children with dyslexia, a neurological condition that impairs the ability to recognize and comprehend the written word.
NEWS
June 14, 2002
Calendar Seaside theme: "Seaside with the Savior" will be the theme for vacation Bible school this year at Broadneck Baptist Church, 1257 Hilltop Drive, Cape St. Claire. Children ages 4 to 10 are invited to participate in the activities from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. June 24 to 28 at the church. A youth group from Starling Avenue Baptist Church in Martinsville, Va., will direct Bible school activities, assisted by members of the Broadneck congregation. A coffee time is offered to parents dropping off children for the sessions.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and Jim Haner and John B. O'Donnell and Jim Haner,Sun Staff Writer | January 22, 1995
With Congress vowing to attack fraud and waste in Social Security's disability program, millions of Americans with serious ailments -- including children in wheelchairs, middle-aged heart disease patients and people with AIDs -- face more uncertainty.But Republicans promise their benefits will be spared -- even as they assail Supplemental Security Income as an out-of-control welfare program.House Speaker Newt Gingrich promised "dramatic changes," but acknowledged in an interview that aid goes to people "with substantial disabilities that require significant assistance."
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 16, 1997
BRING NOODLES to the second Family Fun Night at the Hampstead pool from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday.Noodles, the popular foam swimming toys, are essential for a series of water races planned by Heather King, pool manager.Family Fun Night includes 50-cent hot dogs and plenty of prizes for everyone. Every swimmer will leave with a pile of candy, courtesy of pool management.The first Family Fun Night last month was deemed a success. Lots of wet-and-wild contests were held. About 20 children dived for pennies and quarters.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2010
It has taken 142 years, but Baltimore's first school district leader will finally take his place in the superintendent's suite of city school headquarters. The Rev. John Nelson McJilton received a long-overdue recognition Friday, when city school officials paid homage to the first leader of the district, whose legacy has been ignored for more than a century after his decision to educate black children after the Civil War. Judge Thomas F. Upson, the great-great-grandson of the Rev. John McJilton — who served two years as superintendent beginning in 1866 — presented a commemorative photograph and history lesson on his ancestor Friday, ending a months-long attempt to have his ancestor's name and reputation restored.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2010
As Michael Oher made his way around the room signing footballs, T-shirts, napkins — anything his young fans could get their hands on — he told them that he always wanted a better life. "So the movie was really about you?" one teenage girl asked. "Yeah," the Ravens offensive lineman replied, reaching across the table to sign a piece of paper. "It was rough." Oher's story, portrayed in the book and movie "The Blind Side," has inspired millions, and on Monday he visited the Arrow Child and Family Ministries in Parkville to meet about 70 children going through similar challenges.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Aaron Chester | October 25, 2007
Longtime singer and actress Liza Minnelli returns to Baltimore for the first time since the 1990s on Saturday. After releasing more than 20 albums, the award-winning Broadway performer recently released a DVD featuring some of her more recent work. Proceeds from the concert will go toward the Chimes School for children with disabilities. The performance is at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 1212 Cathedral St. Tickets are $53-$78. The concert starts at 7:30 p.m. Call 410-547-7328 or go to ticketmaster .com.
NEWS
By ANICA BUTLER | March 5, 2006
National Merit scholars named Four more Anne Arundel County high school students have been named National Merit finalists: Chloe J. Moyer, Annapolis High School; Jillian Foley, Broadneck High School; Alex Neville, Meade High School; and Lauren Mehl, South River High School. The National Merit Scholarship Program was founded in 1955 to recognize achievement and offer scholarships, according to the National Merit Scholarship Corp. Students who score in the top 1 percent on the PSAT become semifinalists.
NEWS
September 16, 2005
Two African-American children enrolled at the new Sunnyside Acres School near Glen Burnie in September 1955, marking one of the first steps toward public school integration in Anne Arundel County. Sunnyside Acres School was one of two public schools open to black and white students. The other, the Millersville School for children with cerebral palsy, did not receive applications for admission. Altogether, 45 children applied for admission to Sunnyside Acres but only 30 were accepted, because each of the three teachers could handle only 10 students.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2004
With much pomp and circumstance, they held a commencement yesterday at Gateway School in Northwest Baltimore. And for only three graduates. The pomp: robes and mortarboards, processions and recessions, songs and honors for the graduates, camera-toting parents, balloons, more than a few tears of joy. The circumstance: One graduate, Darius Roberts, 10, was honored for having learned to control his emotions and to read a few words. Kevin Thomas, 11, was praised for overcoming the turmoil of a rare disorder that causes him to eat compulsively.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Sun Staff Writer | June 24, 1994
Desegregation guidelines may affect decisions about who will attend Adams Park Elementary, but they won't affect the Anne Arundel County Board of Education's plans to reopen the school by 1997, the school board's lawyer said yesterday."
NEWS
By ANICA BUTLER | March 5, 2006
National Merit scholars named Four more Anne Arundel County high school students have been named National Merit finalists: Chloe J. Moyer, Annapolis High School; Jillian Foley, Broadneck High School; Alex Neville, Meade High School; and Lauren Mehl, South River High School. The National Merit Scholarship Program was founded in 1955 to recognize achievement and offer scholarships, according to the National Merit Scholarship Corp. Students who score in the top 1 percent on the PSAT become semifinalists.
NEWS
March 29, 2004
`Growin' Up Good' published by founder of Norbel School Norma Hauserman-Campbell, co-founder with her late husband, Robert L. Campbell, of the Norbel School in Elkridge, has published a book, Growin' Up Good: A humorous, common sense blueprint for raising your child to become a responsible, thoughtful, happy person. Hauserman-Campbell, who opened the school for children with learning disabilities almost 25 years ago, is now its director emeritus and grandmother of a Norbel student. Proceeds from sale of the book will benefit Norbel School.
NEWS
March 8, 2004
Last week, in honor of Dr. Seuss' 100th birthday and the National Education Association's Read Across America Day, about 35 children, some in pajamas, listened as Lesley Geisel read to them from her favorite Dr. Seuss book, Oh, The Places You'll Go! Oh the places you'll go! ... I'm sorry to say so but, sadly, it's true that Bang-ups and Hang-ups can happen to you. You can get all hung up in a prickle-ly perch. And your gang will fly on. You'll be left in a Lurch. ... Un-slumping yourself is not easily done.
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