Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSchool Experience
IN THE NEWS

School Experience

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2012
Asa Jackson had come a long way - much further than his cross-country flight - when he first made the short, but winding drive down 1 Winning Drive in Owings Mills in May. A year ago, Jackson was preparing for a slate of games stacked with colleges like Central Oklahoma and Southern Utah. His home stadium at Cal Poly could hold just 11,075 fans. And after wearing cotton shirts and shorts at practice, he appreciated the high-tech performance apparel that arrived before the end of his career at the Football Championship Subdivision school.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
Burleigh Manor Middle School sixth-grade teacher George McGurl says he can recall having an interest in science back in early middle school, and he says his sixth-grade teacher will back him up on that. For good measure, McGurl summons Burleigh Manor science teacher Daryl Blickenstaff - who was McGurl's sixth-grade teacher at Ellicott Mills Middle more than two decades ago, and is one of several of his former teachers working alongside him now. McGurl, 35, said his teachers recognized and cultivated his interests and passions early on. Now he working to do the same for other children.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 9, 1998
A STUDENT'S performance in middle school is often a good indicator of his or her success in high school. The recent report from Anne Arundel County Superintendent Carol S. Parham's Task Force on Student Achievement emphasizes the point. If the system is to improve high school achievement -- as many as one-third of county students can't maintain a C average -- the middle school experience must be more rigorous and demanding.The task force report did not unearth any revolutionary findings, but it focuses on a problem that needs immediate attention.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2012
Asa Jackson had come a long way - much further than his cross-country flight - when he first made the short, but winding drive down 1 Winning Drive in Owings Mills in May. A year ago, Jackson was preparing for a slate of games stacked with colleges like Central Oklahoma and Southern Utah. His home stadium at Cal Poly could hold just 11,075 fans. And after wearing cotton shirts and shorts at practice, he appreciated the high-tech performance apparel that arrived before the end of his career at the Football Championship Subdivision school.
NEWS
By Christina Bittner and Christina Bittner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 10, 2002
BROOKLYN PARK Middle School is the first middle school in the county to be granted a chapter of Best Buddies Maryland. Best Buddies is a nonprofit organization that works to enhance the lives of people who are slow learners by fostering a positive environment for socialization and employment. Each Wednesday afternoon, 15 members spend time with special-education pupils. They do homework together, play games in the gym or on the playing fields and go on outings together. The pupils learn to accept people who are different from themselves.
NEWS
December 17, 1997
TO OUTSIDERS, the Howard County school system is a gem of public education. Its percentage of graduates who go on to college is the highest in Maryland. Its SAT scores and spending per pupil are second, just behind neighboring (and also prestigous) Montgomery County.This image was polished some more by the latest Maryland School Performance Assessment Program results. Howard students as a group again placed ahead of their peers. Noteworthy is the fact that the county's scores rose slightly as the system is becoming more racially and culturally diverse.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Contributing Writers | September 1, 1992
Q: My 9-year-old is beginning to worry about starting school. I can tell because he is quieter and seems to be thinking a lot. He doesn't talk about school much; he says it's a long way off. I'm surprised that he's worried because he seemed to have such a good time in fourth grade and he'll be going to fifth grade in the same school. What shall I do?A: As children get older, they begin to keep track of the calendar just as adults do. It's impossible for them to ignore the approach of the school year.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | August 23, 1993
Faith Christian School will begin its fourth year this fall with a Carroll County Board of Education member as its new educational director.Joseph D. Mish Jr., 53, will remain a member of the school board. A social studies teacher for 25 years, he retired from Carroll schools in 1990, just before he was elected to the board.He is active in his church, Ascension Episcopal in Westminster, and with the Carroll County chapter of the Full Gospel Business Men's Fellowship. He lives in Sykesville with his wife, Lisa Mish.
NEWS
By Norris West | August 11, 1996
ON MY VISITS to public schools over the years, I've routinely asked students how many of them expect to play professional sports.Invariably, half the hands of the classroom's male population shoot skyward. Most of my unscientific surveys have been at elementary and middle school, but I'm guessing that the response from high school students wouldn't be much different.Many children dream of becoming the next sports legend -- and that's fine. Dreams often help to sustain reality. Besides, have you ever tried telling a 14-year-old who can stick three-pointers that he'll never play in the NBA?
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Staff Writer | August 11, 1992
Kindergarten, say educators, is more than just numbers and learning to spell your name."Children learn to interact with other children and in groups," said Joe E. Wilson, principal of Mount Washington Elementary School in Northwest Baltimore, which yesterday held a kindergarten registration session at the Pimlico Mayor's Station. "They learn to work together."A kindergarten setting gives children an important first taste of formal schooling, said Mr. Wilson, whose 360-student school enrolls about 60 to 65 kindergartners.
NEWS
By LEONARD PITTS | November 17, 2008
So it seems there's this new couple coming to town (the husband just got a job with the government). Now they are scouting schools for their children, and people are wondering whether they're going to go public or private. Can we be honest here? D.C. public schools are not good enough for the Obama kids. I'm not doubting the dedication of public school teachers. And yes, there are exceptional public schools - but the exceptions prove the rule. Public schools, particularly in urban areas, are largely failing our children.
NEWS
By SONJA CROSBY and SONJA CROSBY,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 4, 2006
Twenty-one years ago, I was a City College Knight. City College, or the Castle on the Hill as it is still known, was a high school in which Latin was everyone's second language and Thanksgiving was more about the annual City-Poly football game than eating turkey and cranberry sauce. For some of my classmates, these years in high school included such happy milestones as the prom, the big homecoming games and graduation. For me, on the other hand, high school was a series of unrequited loves, being a wallflower at school dances, being picked on by a bully and countless hours doing of all things ... studying!
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | November 4, 2005
There won't be an incumbent running for Anne Arundel County executive in next November's elections, but Roy Skiles figures this would not be a great week to announce his candidacy, if he were so inclined. Skiles is the county's assistant superintendent of school administrative services and the point man on the decision to push up start times on county football games for the rest of the season. Skiles' phone has been ringing all week, and most of the callers have not been inviting him to tea, but rather criticizing him for what they believe is an overreaction to last Friday's shooting at a game at Annapolis High.
NEWS
By MILTON KENT | September 28, 2005
As any parent will tell you, the most delicate act they do in raising their kids is finding the appropriate balance between letting them discover the world and being absolutely frightened out of their skulls over letting them take the journey. The inclination, of course, is to place them in a John Travolta-like plastic bubble that envelops them every second of the day, no matter where they go. But since we know that there isn't that much plastic in the world, not to mention that kids have to grow and develop, that solution isn't practical.
NEWS
By Danny Jacobs and Danny Jacobs,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2005
Police officers Lauren Phillips and Marcus Milford arrived to intervene in a dispute between two downtown merchants. A boutique owner accused an employee of a nearby design studio of loitering in front of the boutique and driving away business. With the officers looking on -- and reminding them of the fine for loitering -- the studio owner chastised her employee and assured the boutique owner it wouldn't happen again. "Case closed," Officer Phillips said with a smile. A typical day in the city -- except that the police and the citizens were all kids.
NEWS
By Halaine S. Steinberg | May 22, 2005
MORE THAN 20 years ago, as a young student teacher at a well-regarded Baltimore County public high school, I had the privilege of teaching an advanced English seminar to the top seniors in the school. At the end of the year, the best student in the class - award-winning school newspaper editor, accomplished athlete, student government representative, Ivy League-bound graduating senior - remarked that he couldn't wait until he started college so he could finally relax. This month, my son will graduate from the same school where this former student stunned me with his comment just as I was beginning my own career in education.
NEWS
By Halaine S. Steinberg | May 22, 2005
MORE THAN 20 years ago, as a young student teacher at a well-regarded Baltimore County public high school, I had the privilege of teaching an advanced English seminar to the top seniors in the school. At the end of the year, the best student in the class - award-winning school newspaper editor, accomplished athlete, student government representative, Ivy League-bound graduating senior - remarked that he couldn't wait until he started college so he could finally relax. This month, my son will graduate from the same school where this former student stunned me with his comment just as I was beginning my own career in education.
NEWS
By Elise Armacost and Elise Armacost,Staff writer | June 11, 1991
At 50, high school graduate Joan Carroll didn't celebrate her new diploma with a wild bash in Ocean City or a pull-out-all-the-stops party. But she wasn't blaming anybody who did.Glowing, the Glen Burnie mother of five and grandmother of three clutched a "CongratulationsGraduate" balloon and smiled until the little lines at the corners of her eyes crinkled."
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | February 4, 2005
THE STAPLE OF every bad standup comedian's routine is the difference between the male and the female of the species. It usually doesn't take long for the headliner at the local chuckle hut to note that men are more logic driven, while women are supposedly ruled by their emotions. How then, most area men will wonder, is it that the area high school basketball game this year that will draw the largest attendance will be played not by two highly ranked boys teams from public high schools, but by two Catholic all-girls schools, Mercy and the Institute of Notre Dame?
NEWS
By Deborah Tulani Salahu-Din | May 4, 2004
FIFTEEN YEARS after Brown vs. Board of Education, I was part of a busing experiment designed to help desegregate schools in Wicomico County. I was 10 then, in 1969. In recalling the anniversary, I've concluded that busing young children to help them achieve a "better" education was futile. I achieved a quality elementary education not because of busing, but in spite of it. My formal education began in the womb of a small, tightly knit black community. My teachers at Salisbury Elementary were, in several cases, neighbors.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.