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By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2011
Catholic school enrollment continued to decline this year, although at a slower pace than in recent years, according to the Archdiocese of Baltimore. The archdiocese said the number of its students declined 4.3 percent this year. However, the latest statistics, as of Sept. 30, reflect the lowest rate of decline in the past four years. After the archdiocese decided to close 13 schools at the end of the 2009-2010 school year, the schools' enrollment declined 9 percent, according to Sean Caine, a spokesman for the archdiocese.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2014
The Baltimore County school board voted Tuesday night to approve one of its largest contracts in recent years, an ambitious $205 million plan to supply laptop computers to the system's 150,000 students and teachers over the next seven years. The school system will lease HP EliteBook Revolves, the centerpiece of Superintendent Dallas Dance's initiative to put a laptop in the hands of every student in the next several years. Dance said the school system will pay for the computers in part with savings from centralizing the purchase and operation of printers, copiers and other technology, and by evaluating whether central office employees who leave the school system should be replaced.
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NEWS
March 23, 1998
Baltimore County's school enrollment is predicted to plateau over the next 10 years, a change from the years of sharp enrollment increases since 1990, according to a consultant's projections released last week. Despite that, the northwest portion of the county and Woodlawn are expected to keepgrowing, forcing school boundary changes, new construction and extensive repairs to older buildings. Here are the enrollment figures for the 1998-1999 and 2007-2008 school years......................
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | August 27, 2013
The time has come for Harford County Public Schools to eliminate the portable classrooms that had become emblematic of overcrowding that plagued the local system for many years. When portable classroom use was at its peak, there were 95 across Harford County; at Southampton Middle School they were so prominent that they obscured the view of the school from the road. Now relatively few are in use as classroom space, but the school system continues to allow 73 of the buildings to be used at 20 of the county's 54 school buildings.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2001
The sheer number of children lining up to get into Baltimore County's newest school made headlines last month. Expecting 655 pupils and built for 706, New Town Elementary enrolled 931 - leaving the campus in need of additional teachers and portable classrooms to handle the overflow. Figures released by school officials at last night's county Board of Education meeting show New Town was by far the most significant error made by officials charged with projecting enrollment in the system's 162 schools.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | July 21, 2003
Mirror, mirror on the wall, which is the fairest open/closed chart of all? With apologies to the Brothers Grimm, authors of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Howard County residents trying to make sense of a seemingly unending stream of school enrollment charts up for a County Council vote may be far more confused than the evil queen's legendary mirror. Those attending a scheduled council public hearing at 7:30 tonight will find charts No. 12 and No. 13 to examine. The charts represent efforts to temporarily limit development around crowded Howard elementary schools in 2006.
NEWS
March 22, 2009
The economic downturn squeezing public education funding in Maryland has had a similar effect on the state's private and parochial schools, whose ability to help needy students with tuition costs has fallen victim to depressed endowments and a precipitous drop in private donations. In the Baltimore Archdiocese, for example, where Catholic schools serve more than 33,000 students, enrollments declined by 5 percent in 2008 - twice the rate of the previous five years. Officials say job losses have left many parents unable to afford annual tuition.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2001
Howard County builders will have to put their development plans on hold until October because of a delay in getting more-accurate school enrollment projections, the key to Howard's complex system of development controls. The projections usually are available in May so that the council can vote in July. This year, because a consultant was hired, the numbers will not be ready until July, and the council, which does not meet in August, will not vote until October. To avoid confusion, the Robey administration has decided to wait for the more-accurate numbers the consultant is preparing.
NEWS
April 7, 1991
Temple Isaiah, which in mid-March announced plans to break away fromthe Howard County Jewish Community School and form its own school, has changed plans and is recommending that its families continue to enroll their children in the community school for at least another year.The school's enrollment includes 400 students from Temple Isaiah -- approximately two-thirds of the student body.Although Temple Isaiah President Lester Feldman would not explainwhy the split was being considered when interviewed last month, he issued a letter to parents two weeks ago referring to concerns by the Temple's school board over a "lack of religious orientation in our children's education."
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 19, 1999
Superintendent Carol S. Parham has postponed announcing her 20-year plan to handle school crowding until the school board meeting at 10 a.m. June 2 in Annapolis.Parham had planned to unveil her plan at the board's regular meeting tonight. A spokesman said she needed extra time to finish her response to an independent consultant's report that recommended options for coping with population shifts in middle and high school districts.The consultant's report, which was presented to the school board in February, said that by 2007, there will be 23,700 high school students, 1,400 more than in 1997.
NEWS
Letter to The Aegis | August 20, 2013
The following was sent to Harford County Executive David R. Craig. A copy was provided for publication. After reading your recent letters, I find myself once again obliged to respond to your comments. It is crucial that the current funding crisis facing our schools not be misconstrued or minimized. Your delineation of the roles and responsibilities of local boards of education as related to governmental bodies is quite accurate. It is very true that local boards of education are intended to be autonomous bodies.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green and Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2013
Baltimore schools CEO Andrés Alonso tearfully announced his resignation Monday, ending a six-year tenure marked by bold yet often divisive reforms and casting uncertainty on the future of the long-troubled school system. Under Alonso's leadership, city schools saw growth in test scores, graduation rates and enrollment, but his administration was dogged by fiscal problems and cheating scandals. "I have enjoyed being the superintendent of the school system in ways that are so astonishing," Alonso said, choking back tears.
NEWS
Bob Ehrlich | April 15, 2013
As many of you know, I was born and raised in solidly working class Arbutus. My family's Protestantism qualified us as an anomaly; the majority of the neighborhood kids were Catholic. Most attended local Catholic schools such as Ascension, Our Lady of Victory, and St. Mark's. A majority of them went on to graduate high school at Cardinal Gibbons, Mount St. Joe, or Seton. This school experience provided parents an attractive "three-fer": religious instruction, challenging academics and excellent athletics - at a reasonable price, to boot.
EXPLORE
Editorial from The Aegis | February 21, 2013
Harford County Public Schools is in the midst of a situation that would have been difficult to predict 15 or 20 years ago: enrollment is declining. The number of students isn't down by all that much this year compared to last year. The number of students attending public schools in Harford County decreased by 354 from the 2011-12 academic year to this year. In a system that serves in excess of 37,000 students, that's a fraction of a percent. The issue isn't that enrollment declined for a single year, or even two years in a row, but it has declined by a few hundred or so students every year since 2004, which means the trend has been in effect for nearly a decade.
EXPLORE
Editorial from The Aegis | December 26, 2012
Even as enrollment in Harford County Public Schools is projected to decrease again in the coming academic year, the school system is seeking an increase of $15.1 million, which would bring spending to $442.8 million in the spending year that begins July 1, 2013. Meanwhile, enrollment dropped from November 2011 to November of this year by 356 students to a total of 37,868. Incremental declines in enrollment have been the rule for the past several years, even as spending has continued to increase.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2012
The sluggish housing market and the ensuing decline in school enrollment has the Carroll County Commissioners considering a proposal to drop impact fees on new home construction for the next few years. The county collects the fees on residential construction to offset the growth-related costs of building the schools and other infrastructure needed to meet the demands of new residents. The fees, which depend on the size of a new home and can be as much as $6,000, pay to build new schools and parks and provide recreation.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Sun Staff Writer | October 14, 1994
On Friday, a story about Baltimore County school enrollments listed the incorrect year of the lowest enrollment since 1971. School enrollment was the lowest in 1986, at 80,600 students.The Sun regrets the errors.Baltimore County school enrollment increased by 3.4 percent this fall to 99,350, the highest in 15 years.The increase of 3,258 students is about 500 less than officials had predicted. But school spokeswoman Judy Aud said final enrollment is likely to meet original projections during the year.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2011
Catholic school enrollment continued to decline this year, although at a slower pace than in recent years, according to the Archdiocese of Baltimore. The archdiocese said the number of its students declined 4.3 percent this year. However, the latest statistics, as of Sept. 30, reflect the lowest rate of decline in the past four years. After the archdiocese decided to close 13 schools at the end of the 2009-2010 school year, the schools' enrollment declined 9 percent, according to Sean Caine, a spokesman for the archdiocese.
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