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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, Erica L. Green and Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
City lawmakers said Monday that they were shocked by newly published reports of school violence and plan to hold hearings to address the hundreds of injury claims filed by teachers. Mary Pat Clarke, chairwoman of the City Council's education committee and a former teacher, said she was taken aback by a Baltimore Sun investigation that included firsthand accounts of teachers who were assaulted in the city's schools. In the last fiscal year, more than 300 workers' compensation claims were related to assaults or run-ins with students, according to data obtained by The Sun. School employees suffer more injuries than those in any city agency except the Police Department, the data show.
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NEWS
August 14, 2012
Please explain why Baltimore County school "leaders" agreed to pay $150,000 to the two school employees who were given contracts by former Superintendent Joe Hairston if the contract was illegal? (School system agrees to settlement with two employees," Aug. 13.) This makes no sense and is another example of unelected people making decisions for those whose taxes pay the freight! As a taxpayer, I resent this type of activity and expect the county executive to rescind this nonsense or Mr. Hairston to pony up to the county treasury.
NEWS
March 4, 2010
I taught in Baltimore County public schools for over 30 years. During that time, I produced an album titled "Kindergarten Blues." The children at my school wanted to own this CD, and I was willing to sell it to them at cost, making absolutely no profit. It would have cost $1 per CD. The Board of Education denied that request, citing their ethics documents. I was fine with that decision, and still am. It amazes and amuses me that an assistant superintendent, Barbara Dezmon, has developed a program, called AIM, that the district tried to force teachers to use, but has now backed off on under pressure from teachers, legislators and parents.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,matthew.brown@baltsun.com | December 21, 2008
A Harford County high school teacher who was arrested last month after being accused of slapping a 16-year-old female student on the buttocks was found dead of a gunshot wound in his home last night. Brian Norman, 34, a history teacher at North Harford High School in Pylesville, was discovered in his home in the 1600 block of Denise Drive in Forest Hill shortly before 8 p.m. by friends concerned for his well-being, Harford County Sheriff's Office spokeswoman Monica Worrell said. Norman was arrested Nov. 13 and charged with a fourth-degree sexual offense, second-degree assault and threatening school employees with bodily harm.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff Writer | August 18, 1993
Following a report condemning the Anne Arundel school system's handling of child abuse cases, Maryland's school superintendent expressed amazement that many teachers interviewed did not recognize signs of abuse or realize it is their responsibility to report it.Yesterday, the county schools took the first step toward changing that.During two half-hour seminars at the Carver Staff Development Center in Crofton, 262 new teachers and more than 700 custodians became the first school employees to receive new handouts listing steps to follow if they suspect a student has been abused.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | September 22, 1998
In a possible violation of state election laws, at least a half-dozen Old Court Middle School employees were recruited and paid $125 each on primary election day to work the polls for state Senate candidate -- and current school board member -- Robert Fulton Dashiell.Dashiell, who was soundly defeated in his primary bid to unseat 10th District Democratic state Sen. Delores G. Kelley, confirmed that the $125 checks were given out at Dashiell's election night ++ headquarters at the Forum, a catering hall in Northwest Baltimore.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff writer | April 24, 1992
When County Executive Robert R. Neall agreed last December to restore wage concessions to school employees who had been asked to take four furlough days, few workers actually expected to see the money.But earlier this week, Neall announced that some money was, in fact, being returned. On Wednesday night, the Board of Education voted to return the $811,672 to school employees.School system Budget Officer Jack White said the money equals about four-fifths of a day's pay. Instead of four furlough days, employees now must give up 3.2 days, he said.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | June 27, 1996
Howard County schools Superintendent Michael E. Hickey has been given a 1.13 percent salary increase for next year by the school board, about the same size as the raises negotiated by teachers and other school employees.Hickey's four top administrators also were granted 1.13 percent pay raises, and other central office employees likely will receive about the same amount, said schools spokeswoman Patti Caplan.The raises go into effect Monday, when the new fiscal year begins. They were approved by the county school board this month in executive sessions but were not announced until yesterday.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | July 2, 1997
Howard County schools Superintendent Michael E. Hickey -- who yesterday became the longest-serving superintendent in Maryland -- has been given a 5 percent salary increase for 1997-1998 by the county school board.The salary increase is similar in size to the ones negotiated by teachers and other school employees. Other central office employees typically receive raises of about the same size as the superintendent.Hickey's annual salary goes from $121,740 to $127,853 -- an increase likely to keep his salary among the top five Maryland school superintendents.
NEWS
April 9, 2013
As a recent letter to the editor noted, studies have shown that a gun in the home increases the risk of suicide, murder and accidents ("Arming school employees only raises danger," April 7). As a footnote to all the media coverage about the massacre that occurred in Newtown, Conn., it should be noted that had Adam Lanza's mother taken the precautions needed and necessary to having guns in her home with an unstable individual having access to them, just maybe this terrible shooting would not have occurred.
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