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NEWS
April 8, 2013
Policymakers charged with creating new gun laws should be guided by scientific evidence. Fortunately, there are data to inform them when considering the National Rifle Association task force proposal to arm more school personnel ("Gun advocates detail plan to arm teachers," April 3). We don't know whether more guns in schools will make schools safer. However, here is what we do know for certain: Each school staff member who becomes a new gun owner will create a more dangerous home.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
The Anne Arundel County school board adopted a $1.02 billion operating budget last week for the next fiscal year that includes funding for employee pay increases and the money to open a new contract school. But the panel criticized county government for taking money from the school system's health fund balance to foot those bills. The board unanimously adopted the operating budget, which falls shy of the $1.04 billion proposal that interim Superintendent Mamie Perkins offered in December.
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NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
Baltimore school employees would be forced to take furlough days if the district has to absorb millions of dollars in education cuts outlined in the state's "doomsday" budget, city schools CEO Andrés Alonso said Tuesday as he prepared to present the fiscal year 2013 budget. In preparation for a massive cut to public education should lawmakers fail to approve higher taxes in a special session starting Monday, the school system has developed a plan to negotiate with labor unions to have employees take four unpaid days off. Alonso said the system found that the four furlough days, which would not include instructional days, would yield enough savings to hold school budgets untouched, a guiding principle of the system's budget.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
The city pension board is requiring about 2,000 school employees to begin contributing to the municipal retirement system, a plan met with resistance by school officials, who say the district won't be able to meet the July 1 deadline. The school system was informed this year that some of its employees would have to begin contributing to the city's Employees' Retirement System for the first time in decades. The school employees affected include paraprofessionals, school police, cafeteria workers and central office staff.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
The city pension board is requiring about 2,000 school employees to begin contributing to the municipal retirement system, a plan met with resistance by school officials, who say the district won't be able to meet the July 1 deadline. The school system was informed this year that some of its employees would have to begin contributing to the city's Employees' Retirement System for the first time in decades. The school employees affected include paraprofessionals, school police, cafeteria workers and central office staff.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Sun Staff Writer | June 29, 1995
Standing in a new library named in his honor yesterday, Baltimore school Superintendent Walter G. Amprey turned to thank the person who had made it all possible -- his wife, Freda.As director of the schools' employee assistance and wellness program, Mrs. Amprey and her staff of three created the $15,000 facility -- and voted to name it the Walter G. Amprey Employee Lending Library. School employees struggling with problems such as alcoholism, drug addiction and marital woes can find resources there.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Mike Bowler and JoAnna Daemmrich contributed to this article | January 31, 1996
City officials have scuttled a plan to dock school employees 10 days' pay and have begun to look elsewhere for savings to bridge a $23 million gap in the Baltimore school budget.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke will meet with his budget advisers this week in an attempt to spread the burden of the deficit to all city agencies. The savings will range from a reduction in purchases to possible layoffs as a last resort, said Clinton R. Coleman, a spokesman for Mr. Schmoke.The city already has advised bond-rating houses that Baltimore will not proceed with the pay deferment plan in an attempt to cope with the budget shortfall, Mr. Coleman said.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2012
Baltimore County school employees have reached a tentative agreement with the school system that would raise the contributions employees make to their health care plans over the next five years in exchange for guarantees that there will be no layoffs or furloughs for three years. Over the next five years, the county's contribution to their health care premiums would drop to 80 percent from 90 percent, which would bring school employees in line with other county workers. School employees who elect to join an HMO would pay less than those who choose the other plans.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | May 6, 1998
Teachers and other groups of Carroll County school employees would receive a 2 percent across-the-board raise under the terms of tentative agreements between two school employees unions and the Board of Education.The Carroll County Education Association, which represents about 1,300 teachers, sent the proposal to its members Monday after two months of negotiating with the school board bargaining team."I think it's the best we can get," said Ralph C. Blevins, president of the teachers union.
NEWS
August 14, 2012
Please explain why Baltimore County school "leaders" agreed to pay $150,000 to the two school employees who were given contracts by former Superintendent Joe Hairston if the contract was illegal? (School system agrees to settlement with two employees," Aug. 13.) This makes no sense and is another example of unelected people making decisions for those whose taxes pay the freight! As a taxpayer, I resent this type of activity and expect the county executive to rescind this nonsense or Mr. Hairston to pony up to the county treasury.
NEWS
Luke Broadwater, Erica L. Green and Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
City lawmakers said Monday that they were shocked by newly published reports of school violence and plan to hold hearings to address the hundreds of injury claims filed by teachers. Mary Pat Clarke, chairwoman of the City Council's education committee and a former teacher, said she was taken aback by a Baltimore Sun investigation that included firsthand accounts of teachers who were assaulted in the city's schools. In the last fiscal year, more than 300 workers' compensation claims were related to assaults or run-ins with students, according to data obtained by The Sun. School employees suffer more injuries than those in any city agency except the Police Department, the data show.
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | November 7, 2013
After eight days of testimony, the prosecution rested its case Thursday afternoon in the Howard County sex abuse trial of a former employee for the Maryland School for the Deaf in Columbia.   Clarence Cepheus Taylor III, 38, of Baltimore County, is a former student life counselor and dormitory aid accused of sexually abusing seven deaf girls who were students at the school between 2008 and 2011. According to State's Attorney spokesman Wayne Kirwan, Judge William V. Tucker allowed Taylor to sleep on his decision to testify on his behalf on Friday.
NEWS
April 9, 2013
As a recent letter to the editor noted, studies have shown that a gun in the home increases the risk of suicide, murder and accidents ("Arming school employees only raises danger," April 7). As a footnote to all the media coverage about the massacre that occurred in Newtown, Conn., it should be noted that had Adam Lanza's mother taken the precautions needed and necessary to having guns in her home with an unstable individual having access to them, just maybe this terrible shooting would not have occurred.
NEWS
April 8, 2013
Policymakers charged with creating new gun laws should be guided by scientific evidence. Fortunately, there are data to inform them when considering the National Rifle Association task force proposal to arm more school personnel ("Gun advocates detail plan to arm teachers," April 3). We don't know whether more guns in schools will make schools safer. However, here is what we do know for certain: Each school staff member who becomes a new gun owner will create a more dangerous home.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2013
For those who believe Phelps Luck Elementary School paraeducator Donna Schulze is too outspoken or too uncompromising on issues relating to her profession, she's got a message for you: Too bad. "If I see something, I'm going to speak up," said Schulze, 59, who was named this month as the national Education Support Professional of the Year by the National Education Association. The NEA award comes with a challenge - Schulze will be called upon to advocate for its organization's 484,000 education support professional members, and will travel to state, regional and national conferences as an ambassador.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2012
Absenteeism soared in Anne Arundel County schools Friday after a week of rampant shooting rumors apparently spooked parents. More than half of the students at two high schools stayed home. Across the system, absences quadrupled at Arundel high schools and increased more than fourfold at middle schools compared to the final day before the holiday break last year, schools spokesman Bob Mosier said, attributing the spike to the rumors. By Tuesday, principals at five high schools and one middle school sent home letters to parents dispelling false reports that a shooting was planned for Friday, one week after a mass shooting in Connecticut that left 20 elementary students and six school employees dead.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,matthew.brown@baltsun.com | December 21, 2008
A Harford County high school teacher who was arrested last month after being accused of slapping a 16-year-old female student on the buttocks was found dead of a gunshot wound in his home last night. Brian Norman, 34, a history teacher at North Harford High School in Pylesville, was discovered in his home in the 1600 block of Denise Drive in Forest Hill shortly before 8 p.m. by friends concerned for his well-being, Harford County Sheriff's Office spokeswoman Monica Worrell said. Norman was arrested Nov. 13 and charged with a fourth-degree sexual offense, second-degree assault and threatening school employees with bodily harm.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff Writer | August 18, 1993
Following a report condemning the Anne Arundel school system's handling of child abuse cases, Maryland's school superintendent expressed amazement that many teachers interviewed did not recognize signs of abuse or realize it is their responsibility to report it.Yesterday, the county schools took the first step toward changing that.During two half-hour seminars at the Carver Staff Development Center in Crofton, 262 new teachers and more than 700 custodians became the first school employees to receive new handouts listing steps to follow if they suspect a student has been abused.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2012
A Baltimore school staff member was injured Monday during an altercation with a woman who pulled out a knife when she was informed she couldn't visit a student, according to city school officials. The school system lauded the rapid actions of school employees who stopped the unsupervised visitor, at a time when school systems across the country are being especially vigilant after a mass shooting at a Connecticut school Friday in which 20 children and six school employees were killed.
NEWS
December 11, 2012
It's time Maryland taxpayers expressed their outrage over the ongoing incompetence in the Baltimore City school system. Taxpayers fund a great deal of what is going on in Baltimore City, yet what are we getting in return? A vibrant school system is essential to any community that wishes to be successful. The most recent debacle was the hiring of someone to counsel kids who had not been properly vetted by the school system before being allowed to interact with vulnerable young people ("City school system broke policy in hiring of Nowlin," Dec. 7)
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