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NEWS
March 24, 2010
Most school districts have received waivers from the state to reduce the number of days students have to make up because of snow in December and February. State schools Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick has waived five days for 12 of the state's 24 school districts, including Baltimore City and Anne Arundel, Kent, St. Mary's, Prince George's and Montgomery counties. Baltimore County recently requested that the state allow the county to reduce its calendar by one school day, which would make the last day of school June 18. Grasmick has not acted on the request.
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NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
OCEAN CITY - Squinting into the August sun at Ocean City's boardwalk Thursday, Comptroller Peter Franchot formally launched his petition drive to require Maryland schools to start after Labor Day. Franchot wants to deliver 10,000 signatures under the banner “Let Summer Be Summer” to Maryland lawmakers in January, when he will kick off lobbying for a new law that would forbid school districts from beginning classes before September. While the petition itself is symbolic, it continues the state comptroller's more than yearlong campaign to push back the first day of school.
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NEWS
March 8, 2012
Bernard Sadusky, the interim state school superintendent, sent a note to local school superintendents on Tuesday afternoon after the state police told him that schools should be on the look out for suspicious letters. Several schools in the northeast have been sent letters containing white powder in the mail with a Texas post mark. The letters were a hoax, and none were sent to Maryland schools that have been discovered. "We've not as yet heard of any instances, but we can't be too careful," said Bill Reinhard, a spokesman for the Maryland State Department of Education.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | May 27, 2014
After a winter like the one that seems like it ended only a few days ago, it's natural for conversations to turn to matters relating to when it's good policy to close schools because of snow, ice or some other inclement weather. The starting point in making such decisions always should be that it is bad public policy to put children at heightened risk of injury, or worse, and it's better to err on the side of caution than to risk safety in the name of preventing the loss of a snow day. Invariably, however, geography comes into play.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2014
The snow continued to play havoc with school schedules Monday, delaying the beginning of state testing in some places and keeping students home for yet another day. All Baltimore-area school systems have used more days than allotted in the school calendar for snow and must find ways to make up those days. School districts also are adjusting their schedules for state testing, which was scheduled to begin Tuesday in some counties, as some students still might have trouble getting to school or focusing on academics.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2014
Maryland State Superintendent of Schools Lillian Lowery said Tuesday that school districts across the state should be allowed to determine for themselves when to start classes after summer break, whether it's before or after Labor Day. Lowery said districts now have the autonomy to start the school year when they see fit and she doesn't want a statewide initiative mandating a post-Labor Day start for all districts. The superintendent spoke in Anne Arundel County at a meeting of a task force considering starting the school year after Labor Day. The Task Force to Study a Post Labor Day Start Date was created by Gov. Martin O'Malley and the General Assembly during last year's Annapolis session to study whether the tourism industry would get a boost if public schools start after Labor Day. Greg Shockley, chairman of the Maryland Tourism Development Board, said pushing back the start of school would not only benefit tourism, but also education through tax revenue.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2014
It will soon be payback time for Maryland students who have spent those lazy snow days sleeping until 10 a.m., playing with friends and sledding. Twenty-two of Maryland's 24 school districts have already plowed through the days they build into their annual calendars for snow and bad-weather closings, according to an unofficial tally by state education officials made before this week's storm. State law requires students to go to school for 180 days.     See updated closings for Thursday So if the snow falls as predicted and schools close a day or two this week, local superintendents will have to start adding days.
NEWS
February 25, 1994
School closings and delays over the past two months of Arctic weather have played havoc with academic and home schedules, driving parents, students and teachers alike to the point of desperation. And every time classes are canceled or start late, some people complain that the weather's really not that bad where they live.In Harford County, Maryland's leader in the weather-shortened school calendar this season, the Harford PTA Council sees a possible solution in adjacent Baltimore County.Schools in Baltimore County's northern Hereford zone, which is hardest hit by winter conditions, may close or open late without affecting decisions for the rest of the county's schools.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Shirley Leung and Carol L. Bowers and Shirley Leung,Sun Staff Writers | July 30, 1995
Some of Maryland's smaller school systems are speeding down the information superhighway, leaving larger school districts eating their cyberdust.Despite comparatively smaller budgets, Kent, Queen Anne's and Worcester counties began investing in computers five or more years ago. Now, their students "surf" the Internet, moving via modem through an international network of databases."
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,matthew.brown@baltsun.com | December 20, 2008
Gov. Martin O'Malley's budget chief is recommending a $37.9 million cut to many of the state's largest school districts in the middle of the academic year, The Baltimore Sun has learned. If cuts were applied evenly to the 13 affected districts, Baltimore would get $6.5 million less from the state this year, according to the proposal now being studied by O'Malley. Baltimore, Anne Arundel and Howard counties would sustain cuts of $1.5 million or more. The cut would help the state close a $415 million gap in its current budget, which has been battered by declining revenues linked to the national economic downturn.
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | April 29, 2014
Baltimore city schools' finance chief will leave at the end of the school year to head back north to Connecticut. Victor De La Paz was appointed chief financial officer of the New Haven, Conn. school district Tuesday night, according to published reports.  According to the New Haven Independent, De La Paz will start his post there on July 14. De La Paz was brought here from Hartford, Conn. by former schools CEO Andres Alonso in 2012, and his departure means that Baltimore will most likely see a complete turnover of central office leadership when incoming superintendent Gregory Thornton starts his tenure on July 1.  Thornton announced key appointments to his cabinet, including a new chief of staff and chief academic officer, last week.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and By Liz Bowie | March 4, 2014
Because some school districts lost two days of school during the last snow storm, Maryland education officials have given local school systems the flexibility to adjust the days they give the Maryland School Assessments. The state has extended the 12-day window that the reading and math tests can be given by two more days, until March 14. Make-up tests can be given between March 17-18. Local schools decide the exact four days they will give the tests - two for math and two for reading - within the 12-day window.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2014
The snow continued to play havoc with school schedules Monday, delaying the beginning of state testing in some places and keeping students home for yet another day. All Baltimore-area school systems have used more days than allotted in the school calendar for snow and must find ways to make up those days. School districts also are adjusting their schedules for state testing, which was scheduled to begin Tuesday in some counties, as some students still might have trouble getting to school or focusing on academics.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2014
It will soon be payback time for Maryland students who have spent those lazy snow days sleeping until 10 a.m., playing with friends and sledding. Twenty-two of Maryland's 24 school districts have already plowed through the days they build into their annual calendars for snow and bad-weather closings, according to an unofficial tally by state education officials made before this week's storm. State law requires students to go to school for 180 days.     See updated closings for Thursday So if the snow falls as predicted and schools close a day or two this week, local superintendents will have to start adding days.
NEWS
January 29, 2014
The State Board of Education took an important step toward improving educational opportunities for students throughout Maryland this week when it approved new regulations designed to reduce the number of young people suspended or expelled from school. Educators have long recognized that kicking kids out of classes for relatively minor, nonviolent offenses rarely leads to improvements in behavior and may even be counterproductive. The new policy aims to encourage teachers and principals to find alternative ways of disciplining students that allow them to remain in school whenever possible so they don't fall behind in their studies or develop even worse problems outside the classroom.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2014
School districts across the nation will be able to apply for competitive grants to develop or update their school safety plans, U.S. Sen. Barbara Mikulski announced Wednesday in Baltimore County. The new Comprehensive School Safety Initiative will provide $50 million to school districts across the country who want to train and hire school personnel and buy equipment to improve school safety. Another $25 million will be used for research into analyzing the causes of school violence, including the gaps in mental health for students and their exposure to violence.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Evening Sun Staff | February 22, 1991
The "APEX" program, Maryland's ambitious, five-year school aid initiative, is on a collision course with fiscal reality.Enacted with high hopes in 1987, the "Action Plan for Educational Excellence" was intended to boost the state's share of aid to local school districts.But as the program enters its fifth year, that share is projected to be exactly what it was at the start.The millions of extra dollars pumped into local education simply weren't enough to keep pace with spiraling costs, fiscal experts say.And the well has begun to run dry.State legislators, under pressure to chop the budget because of the state's serious economic problems, already are talking about cuts in the $87 million funding increase that state law mandates for the APEX program in fiscal 1992, which begins July 1.The APEX law will require an even bigger increase in state funding for fiscal 1993 -- an estimated $182 million.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2002
Parents will have a better chance this fall to rescue their children from underperforming schools across the Baltimore region, thanks to a new federal law. But moving to a better school still might prove more difficult than Congress intended. The No Child Left Behind Act, signed this year by President Bush, requires every school district to give parents of students in poorly performing schools a chance to transfer their children to higher-achieving schools - and it requires the school districts to pay for the buses to take them there.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2014
Maryland State Superintendent of Schools Lillian Lowery said Tuesday that school districts across the state should be allowed to determine for themselves when to start classes after summer break, whether it's before or after Labor Day. Lowery said districts now have the autonomy to start the school year when they see fit and she doesn't want a statewide initiative mandating a post-Labor Day start for all districts. The superintendent spoke in Anne Arundel County at a meeting of a task force considering starting the school year after Labor Day. The Task Force to Study a Post Labor Day Start Date was created by Gov. Martin O'Malley and the General Assembly during last year's Annapolis session to study whether the tourism industry would get a boost if public schools start after Labor Day. Greg Shockley, chairman of the Maryland Tourism Development Board, said pushing back the start of school would not only benefit tourism, but also education through tax revenue.
NEWS
October 18, 2013
Marylanders should be paying attention to what is emerging as a key issue in the governor's race — possible statewide expansion of pre-kindergarten public education. Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown and Attorney General Douglas Gansler, the front-running Democratic candidates, along with other political hopefuls, are proposing some form of wider pre-K instruction. It is certainly proven that 5-year-olds with a year of pre-K school under their belt will, on average, perform better in their academic careers than their peers who do not attend.
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