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NEWS
August 9, 2013
The author of the op-ed "The paradox of lowering standards" (August 5) may understand statistics, but he fails to grasp the purpose of the new school discipline regulations under consideration by the Maryland State Board of Education. The board's proposed discipline code aims to make sure that all children, of all races, get educated. Every day a child is suspended is a day that child misses a chance to learn - and more than 50,000 Maryland children are suspended or expelled annually.
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NEWS
February 20, 2014
Perhaps the Baltimore City Council should go back and read Jane Sundius' commentary from earlier this year ( "Guidelines aim to end disparity in school discipline," Jan. 9). There she chastised the school system for putting far too many students out of the classroom for minor offenses and quoted approvingly U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan when he said that "it is adult behavior that has to change. " Really? As any educator knows, it starts with minor offenses, and if we let these behaviors slide we soon wind up with teachers being physically harmed.
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NEWS
February 20, 2014
Perhaps the Baltimore City Council should go back and read Jane Sundius' commentary from earlier this year ( "Guidelines aim to end disparity in school discipline," Jan. 9). There she chastised the school system for putting far too many students out of the classroom for minor offenses and quoted approvingly U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan when he said that "it is adult behavior that has to change. " Really? As any educator knows, it starts with minor offenses, and if we let these behaviors slide we soon wind up with teachers being physically harmed.
NEWS
February 18, 2014
Kudos to your reporters for exposing reality as it exists in many schoolhouses ( "Painful lessons: Run-ins with students take toll on teachers, city finances," Feb. 16). I realize this expose is part of a long range look into workman's compensation, but to many readers the revelations are like Upton Sinclair's novel, The Jungle about the meatpacking industry, where the author famously said, "I aimed at their hearts, but hit their stomachs instead. " The riotous conditions existing in many classrooms have been hushed for years.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2011
In an attempt to tighten state regulations governing school discipline, the state school board will gather reaction on a proposal to limit the time a suspended student can be kept out of school during the appeal of a serious disciplinary action. The board said Tuesday it wants to implement a regulation that would require a school system to bring a student back to school the day after the suspension is over. In some school systems, a student can be kept out of school for weeks or months while an appeal is heard, a practice the state board wants to stop.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2014
Federal education and justice officials unveiled during a visit to Baltimore on Wednesday the first set of national school discipline guidelines to reduce out-of-school suspensions and address the disproportionate suspension rates of students of color and those with disabilities. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and Attorney General Eric Holder jointly announced the comprehensive package of guidelines at Frederick Douglass High School, the first time the federal government has issued guidance on school discipline.
NEWS
By Jane Sundius | January 9, 2014
The nation's top cop and principal visited Frederick Douglass High School in Baltimore this week, but not for reasons you think. U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder and U.S. Department of Education Secretary Arne Duncan visited Douglass to release federal recommendations on school discipline policies that aim to lower out of school suspensions and ensure that they are no longer handed out to children of color at rates that are double or triple the...
NEWS
March 15, 1995
With stiff competition for limited money in the county's education budget, from classroom supplies to new buildings, it might seem like a mistake for the Carroll County Board of Education to ask for money to staff "timeout" discipline rooms in 10 schools.Suspend the troublemakers and let them and their parents deal with the consequences, rather than burdening the school budget, would be one hard-line response.That reasoning, however, misses the point that schools have always had to deal with problem pupils whose behavior does not justify the more drastic suspension-expulsion process.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | November 19, 2003
RUSSELL Skiba pondered the irony of being invited to Baltimore from Indiana for a mid-November speech. "My guess is," he told the group gathered yesterday in downtown Baltimore, "you don't invite too many people from Indianapolis here during football season." Indeed we don't. Fortunately, Skiba wasn't here to talk about that unpleasant Colts-Irsay business. But his topic was just as unpleasant. Skiba focused on "The Disproportionate Impact of School Discipline Policies on Race and Gender."
NEWS
December 20, 1994
School officials in Baltimore County are unnerved by it; in Howard County, they're studying it. In Anne Arundel, they're under a federal agreement to fix it. The problem they and many other school systems share is a huge disparity in the levels of school disciplinary actions against black and white students. Black students are suspended at triple the rate of whites nationally.To say this is a volatile issue is to understate the case. Some observers, particularly black parents and scholars, believe the schools have difficulty communicating with black youths.
NEWS
By Jane Sundius | January 9, 2014
The nation's top cop and principal visited Frederick Douglass High School in Baltimore this week, but not for reasons you think. U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder and U.S. Department of Education Secretary Arne Duncan visited Douglass to release federal recommendations on school discipline policies that aim to lower out of school suspensions and ensure that they are no longer handed out to children of color at rates that are double or triple the...
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2014
Federal education and justice officials unveiled during a visit to Baltimore on Wednesday the first set of national school discipline guidelines to reduce out-of-school suspensions and address the disproportionate suspension rates of students of color and those with disabilities. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and Attorney General Eric Holder jointly announced the comprehensive package of guidelines at Frederick Douglass High School, the first time the federal government has issued guidance on school discipline.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2013
Junior quarterback Seth Higgins (Edgewood) combined for 246 passing and rushing yards and two touchdowns, and junior middle linebacker Cody Acker returned an interception 19 yards for a score in Morgan State's 34-21 win against Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference foe Florida A&M on Saturday. But another factor (or two) in the team's first victory of the year involved turnovers and penalties. The Bears (1-5, 1-1 MEAC) did not turn the ball over against the Rattlers (1-4, 0-1), the first time this season the team did not give the ball away.
NEWS
August 9, 2013
The author of the op-ed "The paradox of lowering standards" (August 5) may understand statistics, but he fails to grasp the purpose of the new school discipline regulations under consideration by the Maryland State Board of Education. The board's proposed discipline code aims to make sure that all children, of all races, get educated. Every day a child is suspended is a day that child misses a chance to learn - and more than 50,000 Maryland children are suspended or expelled annually.
NEWS
By James P. Scanlan | August 5, 2013
On July 23, the Maryland State Board of Education preliminarily approved new public school discipline regulations aimed at generally reducing suspension rates as well as racial disparities in suspension rates. Public comment will be solicited on the proposed regulations, and the board will vote in early December. Concerns that minority students are suspended several times as often as whites have lately prompted a number of jurisdictions to consider relaxing discipline standards. The approach is consistent with a near-universal perception, promoted by the Departments of Education and Justice, that stringent discipline policies lead to large racial differences in discipline rates.
NEWS
By Liz Ryan | February 28, 2013
In response to the Newtown tragedy in December, the Obama administration proposed a package of reforms, including a proposal to provide $150 million for local jurisdictions to hire new school resource officers (SROs) or counselors and $4 billion for the Community Oriented Police (COPS) program, which can also be used to hire law enforcement in schools. Members of Congress will be considering these proposals in the appropriations process and have introduced a number of others that would authorize more law enforcement officers in schools.
NEWS
May 20, 1996
JODIE ULRICH'S errant pepper spray canister clouded more than just a cafeteria. It may have forced the public to rethink whether it truly wants "zero tolerance" discipline in the schools.Surely, folks like its sound. "Zero tolerance" conjures up a get-tough, non-nonsense approach to what many agree is the thorniest problem in education. A Harris poll a few years back estimated that 160,000 children stay home from school daily because of fear. Another survey said one in 11 teachers has been attacked.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2012
Suspensions and other disciplinary actions for African-American students fell at Anne Arundel County schools last year because of new practices, said a school system team examining purported racial disparities in punishments. The audit, design and planning team was created by schools Superintendent Kevin Maxwell as part of efforts to address concerns about school discipline, particularly among African-American students, who school officials say make up 22 percent of the school district's enrollment but account for a higher percentage of suspensions.
NEWS
February 3, 2012
Kudos to the Maryland State Board of Education for its careful study of school discipline practices and for its plan to require Maryland school systems reduce out-of-school suspensions over the next three years ("State wants to curb student suspensions," Jan. 25). In effect, the state board is urging local school systems to use nonviolent transgressions as teachable opportunities, not suspendable ones. The state board's actions will guide principals who regularly face thorny discipline questions.
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