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NEWS
September 24, 2012
I think we need to require that all children of illegal immigrants take classes in school that will lead them to becoming citizens of the U.S. The Supreme Court requires all states to allow illegal immigrant children to attend public schools. So, why not require them take the classes needed to become citizens of the U.S. as an added certificate to their high school diploma? Then they would be citizens to attend colleges as any other U.S. citizen student. Any student who does not take these classes and not graduate high school would be deported to their home country.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 13, 2014
Soft love doesn't belong in education, but it is often a motivator in allowing our youth to proceed in the system without achieving the required knowledge. Yes, love may be a motivator in allowing a student to "do a project" instead of qualifying, although such compromises also cover up the failure of the system to have the student qualify. "Do a project instead of qualifying" is one of many examples of demand compromise which have spared some young people the hurt of a current failure while dooming them to future pain of inability to cope as adults.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2013
Richard Stem left Westminster High School before graduation to join the military at the start of World War II, and he never returned to pick up his diploma. Now, the 93-year-old is set to become one of the earliest graduates of the class of 2014. On Wednesday, the Carroll County Board of Education will award Stem a high school diploma under a 2000 state law that allows World War II veterans who left for service as seniors in high school before graduation to be awarded diplomas. He will coincidentally receive his diploma the same week he and other current and former military personnel nationwide observe Veterans Day. Carroll County officials said such diplomas do not designate which school the graduate attended and make no mention of the recipient's original graduation year.
NEWS
July 8, 2014
I was blessed to be an instructor at Baltimore Reads, Inc. It gave thousands of books away and taught English, civics and literacy. It gave students a power that only comes through education. The instructors and administration taught in all elements, often dragging our classrooms from site to site. Our students meant everything. Their goals meant everything. It was heartbreaking to inform them we were closing. Why? Funding. Money. It told the students their futures weren't good enough to fund.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2010
Baltimore's top cop is adding another obligation to his busy schedule next month: part-time student. Speaking at a ceremony Friday for a group of officers enrolled in a leadership certificate program at the University of Maryland University College, Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III disclosed that he would soon be going back to school himself. Bealefeld has a high school diploma. He dropped out of Anne Arundel Community College to join the police academy after suffering a sports injury that dashed his hopes of earning an athletic scholarship.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,SUN STAFF | November 22, 2004
Yvonne Butler has seen high school dropouts weathered by Baltimore's drug corners progress from being illiterate to joining book clubs, graduating from college and working decent jobs. Yet for every successful student who completes her GED preparation classes at the Learning Bank in West Baltimore, there are hundreds waiting to get in the door. The Learning Bank's waiting list is 700 names long - about as many students as the nonprofit organization teaches in a year. Students wait up to three months to start courses, double the waiting time from two years ago. "It's always a downer when we don't have enough funds for more teachers and tutors," said Butler, who has taught adult-education classes for six years.
NEWS
July 4, 2014
In response to the recent commentary about the challenges facing Baltimore's next schools CEO, "A perpetual hot seat" (June 30), too many young people are graduating from Baltimore City schools at a 3rd or 4th grade reading level. This is a crime and needs to be addressed immediately. I'm thankful that there is a focus on 3rd grade reading now, but we can't just throw away those young people who are older. Drastic intervention is needed. It's hard enough to get a job these days with only a high school diploma.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
Howard County Public Schools leads all state systems in percentage of high school graduates that go on to enroll in college, according to Maryland Department of Education data. Officials said that 85.6 percent of Howard County's high school graduates in 2012 enrolled in college within 16 months of earning a high school diploma. The figure was 16 percentage points higher than the state average, officials said. Howard County also tops all state school districts in the percentage of African American graduates (78 percent)
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2014
The director of Baltimore's Department of Social Services office announced her resignation Tuesday, after seven years leading the agency. Molly McGrath Tierney said she was leaving to join Bennett Midland, a New York-based management consulting firm, as a senior partner. Her last day will be Feb. 28. "I am proud of our accomplishments at BCDSS and have decided it is time to take on the new challenge of extending our accomplishments in Maryland to other parts of the country where there is a growing appetite for this kind of success," she said in a statement.
NEWS
By Raymond A. ''Chip'' Mason | December 19, 1997
THE MARYLAND State Board of Education's recent bold decision to require students to pass a series of tough tests before receiving a high school diploma should be applauded and supported by every Marylander.We must expect of high school students what will be expected of them after they graduate. And we must enable our high schools to see that students meet these vital expections.A high-tech worldToday's high school students will soon find themselves in a world awash in technological innovation, a world caught up in intense global competition for workers and markets.
NEWS
July 4, 2014
In response to the recent commentary about the challenges facing Baltimore's next schools CEO, "A perpetual hot seat" (June 30), too many young people are graduating from Baltimore City schools at a 3rd or 4th grade reading level. This is a crime and needs to be addressed immediately. I'm thankful that there is a focus on 3rd grade reading now, but we can't just throw away those young people who are older. Drastic intervention is needed. It's hard enough to get a job these days with only a high school diploma.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
Howard County Public Schools leads all state systems in percentage of high school graduates that go on to enroll in college, according to Maryland Department of Education data. Officials said that 85.6 percent of Howard County's high school graduates in 2012 enrolled in college within 16 months of earning a high school diploma. The figure was 16 percentage points higher than the state average, officials said. Howard County also tops all state school districts in the percentage of African American graduates (78 percent)
NEWS
July 2, 2014
The Downtown Columbia Partnership has named Gregory A. Fitchitt as president and chair of the board and appointed Barbara A. Nicklas executive director. Established in 2013, the Downtown Columbia Partnership is an independent nonprofit dedicated to marketing and promoting downtown Columbia. The partnership's seven-member board elected Fitchitt and confirmed Nicklas in June. Fitchitt, who also serves as vice president of development for The Howard Hughes Corp., said, "This is an exciting time for Downtown Columbia as it evolves with the welcome addition of new retailers and restaurant options, and later this year, some new places to live.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
All that was standing between AuQwan Griffin and a high school diploma was a state biology exam and a conflicted conscience. That crossroads led to the biggest teachable moment of his educational career. Griffin and 10 fellow students at the Career Academy were given answers to the High School Assessments by their biology teacher, according to city school officials, who investigated when they saw unusually high scores at the alternative high school in North Baltimore. The cheating cost Griffin and his classmates their diplomas; they must go back to summer school if they want to graduate.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2014
A significant number of Baltimore-area residents are struggling with so many challenges — from a lack of education to the lack of a car — that they're hard-pressed to land a job and even harder-pressed to find one that can lift them out of poverty, according to a regional group of government agencies, nonprofits and other players. "Most of the region's low-skilled job seekers face multiple and complex barriers to employment opportunity that have been getting worse," the Opportunity Collaborative concluded in its report, released Monday.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2014
As Tekeya Mayfield walked onto the stage to accept her slain brother's high school diploma, she paused briefly, wiping her eyes as the crowd inside the building rose to their feet in a growing cheer. She stepped forward, embracing Edmondson-Westside High School's principal for a long moment before taking Michael Mayfield's diploma and thrusting it toward the sky. School administrators burst into tears. Later, she said she felt her brother "definitely was there with me" in the bittersweet ceremony at Coppin State University's Physical Education Complex on Saturday morning.
NEWS
February 3, 2008
A nationwide grant program awarded Chesapeake High School a new $4,000 piano for its choral students last week. The Pasadena school was one of 20 winners nationwide to receive grants from My Hometown Helper, an arm of General Mills. The piano was unveiled Wednesday in a ceremony that also included a mini-concert by Rachel Franklin, a classical and jazz chamber pianist and Baltimore Symphony Orchestra lecturer. A new grant cycle began Friday. Communities can apply for one-time grants for projects such as building playgrounds, buying band uniforms and expanding town sidewalks.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2013
Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler on Thursday released details of his plan to improve education by creating an apprenticeship program for teenagers.  In the second of his "Front and Center" web videos about his campaign for governor, Gansler called for a program that allows 16-year-old students to get high school credit while learning career skills in internships. "When, they graduate, they'll have a high school diploma and be job-ready. Or they can go to a community college or to a university," Gansler, a Democrat, running said in the two-minute video posted on YouTube.
NEWS
April 14, 2014
Nancy Reigle in her letter, "Is vocational education still a possibility for Maryland?" (April 10), is right on time with her remarks about students being forced to feel they must go to college, presumably to "better themselves. " Not every student is college material. Heaven knows we already have far too many lawyers, doctors, computer "experts," etc. to find work. Furthermore, there is absolutely nothing shabby about being a worker who is "gainfully employed" and making an honest living.
NEWS
February 4, 2014
The minimum wage is a permanent wage for the undereducated, for whom robots and overseas labor have replaced the unskilled work that once paid a living wage ( "Not so fast on minimum wage," Feb. 1). Moreover, by permitting students to leave school at age 16 without a high school diploma, as 15 percent of students currently do, the state bears significant responsibility for creating this underclass of workers. Even high school graduates who do not proceed to college or acquire a vocational skill in high school are unprepared for work that is much beyond the level of a minimum wage.
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