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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | April 7, 1991
"Separate But Equal," ABC's two-part miniseries about th Supreme Court's landmark school desegregation decision, is itself almost landmark television in two respects. One is the performance of Sidney Poitier as Thurgood Marshall, the NAACP lawyer and future Supreme Court justice who argued one of the cases that became known as Brown vs. Board of Education. Poitier's acting style may be too big-screen rococo for some television tastes. But its moments of high-intensity grandeur make it one of the performances of the television year.
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NEWS
October 12, 2010
The new union contract Baltimore City teachers are voting on Wednesday and Thursday has the potential to radically change the nature of public education not only for city schoolchildren but for students in school districts across the state. It would immediately thrust Baltimore into the forefront of school reform efforts nationally and provide a model for others to emulate that represents a bold departure from the past. A success of that magnitude here would force neighboring jurisdictions to adopt similar changes or risk a brain drain of talented teachers, who would flock to Baltimore for higher salaries and the chance to really make a difference in young people's lives.
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NEWS
By Clarence Page | June 27, 1997
WASHINGTON -- News that the nation's oldest and largest civil-rights organization is considering a shift away from school desegregation signals a moral victory for Clarence Thomas.For years the conservative black Supreme Court justice has argued that public-school desegregation is vastly overrated as a goal for civil-rights law. Now a rising chorus in the nation's leading integrationist organization, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, appears to agree. NAACP leaders plan a formal debate on the long-held school-integration policy when at their annual convention next month in Pittsburgh.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | December 7, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Affirmative action is on trial at the U.S. Supreme Court. Judging by the chilly reception that five of the nine justices gave it during oral arguments this week, the only question left is how far the court will go in overruling racial preferences as a constitutional way to remedy the historical damage done by racial preferences. I do not use the P-word lightly. I have publicly debated former University of California regent Ward Connerly and others who use the word "preferences" to denounce any effort by government to remedy the historical problems of race by taking race into account.
NEWS
By Bob Dart and Bob Dart,Cox News Service | January 9, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Segregation of Hispanic students has grown "dramatically" as their numbers doubled during the past two decades, a study of school population patterns showed yesterday.Meanwhile, progress toward racial integration in urban schools has stagnated since the early 1970s, the study found. And a middle-class black exodus from the inner cities is rapidly changing the racial composition of schools in suburbs such as DeKalb County, Ga., where the school population changed from 5 percent black in 1967 to 54 percent black in 1988.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and James Bock and Mark Bomster and James Bock,Staff Writers | April 1, 1992
Benjamin L. Hooks, executive director of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, yesterday called the school desegregation decision a "striking blow to the NAACP's historic effort to secure equal opportunity to quality education for minority children."In a statement released at the NAACP's Baltimore headquarters, Dr. Hooks predicted the decision would prompt school districts to go back into court to end desegregation orders. He said it would "surely encourage recalcitrant school districts to drag their feet in achieving meaningful desegregation."
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Staff Writer | April 2, 1992
A regional leader of black churches today joined critics of a U.S. Supreme Court decision involving court-ordered school desegregation, saying it will lead to re-segregation.Since the historic Brown vs. Board of Education decision 38 years ago, many blacks have perceived that federal judges were on their side in the fight for integration, said the Rev. H. Hartford Brookins, bishop of the Second District of the African Methodist Episcopal Church.Now it appears as though federal judges, who enforce federal desegregation orders, will join those "who have been against us all along," he said.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff Writer | August 14, 1995
John Helm Pratt, a federal judge who handled cases that affected school desegregation in Maryland and elsewhere, as well as the first trial of former Gov. Marvin Mandel on corruption charges, died Friday of lung cancer at his home in Chevy Chase. He was 84.Judge Pratt was appointed to the U.S. District Court in 1968 for the District of Columbia and oversaw a number of significant cases during his 27 years on the court.In 1976, he declared a mistrial in the first political corruption trial of Marvin Mandel after learning that jurors had been exposed to publicity about the case.
NEWS
April 2, 1998
Harold Wilson, 76, a Marine who won the Medal of Honor, the nation's highest award for military bravery, died Sunday in West Columbia, S.C., of lung cancer.He was a sergeant when he helped fight an enemy attack through the night of April 23-24, 1951, during the Korean War.Wounded in an arm, a leg, his head and a shoulder, he rallied troops, delivered ammunition and administered first aid as attackers swarmed his platoon's position. Only after the final attack had been repulsed at dawn did Mr. Wilson walk unassisted a half-mile to the aid station.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The SunWashington Bureau of The Sun | January 16, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court, making its first gesture toward closing the constitutional book on school desegregation, ruled yesterday that public school systems do not have to eliminate all one-race schools.In a historic decision issued nearly 37 years after the justices in Brown vs. Board of Education unanimously struck down segregated schools, a divided court sent stern orders to lower-court judges to ease their grip on school systems that have obeyed desegregation mandates.If a school system that once had forced blacks and whites to go to separate schools has carried out desegregation orders in "good faith," has done so for a "reasonable period of time" and no longer makes school policy based on intentional racial bias, its constitutional duty is at an end and court supervision must stop, the court declared by a 5-3 vote.
NEWS
December 5, 2006
It's been quite a while since the U.S. Supreme Court has wrestled with desegregation in elementary and secondary schools, but a pair of cases heard yesterday puts the court back in the middle of this contentious issue. The justices are considering whether school systems can voluntarily take race into account to promote diversity among school populations without violating the Constitution. We think the answer should be yes. School assignment plans in two districts are before the court. In Seattle, students could attend one of 10 public high schools in different parts of the city, but they had to apply for their school of choice.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ray Jenkins and Ray Jenkins,Special to the Sun | May 16, 2004
In this 50th-anniversary celebration of the Supreme Court's epochal Brown vs. Board of Education decision, which held school segregation to be unconstitutional, it is almost a national heresy to pose the question: Was this decision really necessary? Merely to ask puts the questioner in dubious company. After all, the very first book -- if you can call it that -- about the Brown decision was a screed titled Black Monday. The author was an obscure Mississippi judge named Tom P. Brady, and although the book was self-published, it was an instant best-seller that swept the Deep South like the boll weevil and became the bible around which the White Citizens Council, a kind of coat-and-tie version of the Ku Klux Klan, took root throughout the region.
NEWS
By Mike Adams and Mike Adams,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 6, 2002
TOPEKA, Kan. - City schools Superintendent Robert McFrazier stood on the playground of the modern Williams magnet school and gazed toward Monroe Elementary, a relic from the days of segregation that spurred the filing of the landmark Brown vs. Board of Education lawsuit by 13 black parents here a little more than half a century ago. Inside Williams, built at a cost of $4 million to meet a 1994 federal desegregation order, the classrooms seemingly mirrored...
NEWS
January 31, 2001
FEW PEOPLE had ever heard of racial profiling a few years ago. But now it's a household phrase, because former Attorney General Janet Reno's lawyers proved many police departments were treating skin color as if it were a highway crime, pulling over minority drivers for one reason -- their race. It was an important reminder that discrimination is still very much alive in America. During Ms. Reno's tenure, Justice Department lawyers delved into problems in employment, fair housing and lending, education, public accommodations and voting.
NEWS
April 2, 1998
Harold Wilson, 76, a Marine who won the Medal of Honor, the nation's highest award for military bravery, died Sunday in West Columbia, S.C., of lung cancer.He was a sergeant when he helped fight an enemy attack through the night of April 23-24, 1951, during the Korean War.Wounded in an arm, a leg, his head and a shoulder, he rallied troops, delivered ammunition and administered first aid as attackers swarmed his platoon's position. Only after the final attack had been repulsed at dawn did Mr. Wilson walk unassisted a half-mile to the aid station.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | June 27, 1997
WASHINGTON -- News that the nation's oldest and largest civil-rights organization is considering a shift away from school desegregation signals a moral victory for Clarence Thomas.For years the conservative black Supreme Court justice has argued that public-school desegregation is vastly overrated as a goal for civil-rights law. Now a rising chorus in the nation's leading integrationist organization, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, appears to agree. NAACP leaders plan a formal debate on the long-held school-integration policy when at their annual convention next month in Pittsburgh.
NEWS
December 5, 2006
It's been quite a while since the U.S. Supreme Court has wrestled with desegregation in elementary and secondary schools, but a pair of cases heard yesterday puts the court back in the middle of this contentious issue. The justices are considering whether school systems can voluntarily take race into account to promote diversity among school populations without violating the Constitution. We think the answer should be yes. School assignment plans in two districts are before the court. In Seattle, students could attend one of 10 public high schools in different parts of the city, but they had to apply for their school of choice.
NEWS
By M. WILLIAM SALGANIK | May 15, 1994
The United States seems to have left school desegregation behind.Not that the job has been completed. Most black students attend majority-black schools.Not that anyone is proposing that black and white students be separated by law, as they were in 17 states before the U.S. Supreme Court ruled, 40 years ago this week, that "in the field of public education, the doctrine of 'separate but equal' has no place."But political and demographic trends are combining to limit how much children of different races are brought together.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff Writer | August 14, 1995
John Helm Pratt, a federal judge who handled cases that affected school desegregation in Maryland and elsewhere, as well as the first trial of former Gov. Marvin Mandel on corruption charges, died Friday of lung cancer at his home in Chevy Chase. He was 84.Judge Pratt was appointed to the U.S. District Court in 1968 for the District of Columbia and oversaw a number of significant cases during his 27 years on the court.In 1976, he declared a mistrial in the first political corruption trial of Marvin Mandel after learning that jurors had been exposed to publicity about the case.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 14, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court, having built a reputation in recent years for cautious and modest use of its power, showed its other side this week by reaching out on a grand scale to answer questions about race relations that it could have avoided.In two of the most important decisions in years on racial equality, a five-justice conservative majority on Monday appeared to go out of its way to declare new constitutional law.More broadly than it had been asked, the court acted against affirmative action in federal programs and against ambitious school desegregation orders by federal judges.
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