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NEWS
August 26, 2013
As Baltimore school board officials search for a new city schools CEO, they might do well to note the big gains in student achievement at schools in the District of Columbia where educators have made a longer school day part of the reform effort. It's worked well enough in Washington that Baltimore might well benefit from emulating that city's success. More instructional time in the classroom appears to have helped D.C. children not only boost their performance on standardized tests but do so more rapidly than their peers at schools with traditional 7.5-hour schedules.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Randi Hogan and Norris P. West | August 25, 2014
Every school should have a Donte Samuel. For more than eight years, Mr. Samuel has created a warm and happy environment at Belmont Elementary in West Baltimore, where excited pupils greet him daily with bright eyes and wide smiles in the middle of their regimented school day. Mr. Samuel is not a teacher or an administrator; he's not a school nurse, social worker or custodian. To the children, he's "coach," and to the principal and teachers at Belmont Elementary, he's a godsend and the key to a better classroom climate for the 355 students and 24 teachers.
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NEWS
August 30, 2013
We applaud your recent editorial advocating the Baltimore City Public Schools examine extended school days as a way to boost student achievement ( "Expanding the school day," Aug. 26). Models like the Harlem Children's Zone are excellent examples of how additional instruction time can improve learning outcomes. Educators know that students who participate in extended learning opportunities get better grades, attend school at a higher rate than their peers and show improved behavior.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | March 27, 2014
The strong desire to retain local control over the management of the county school system expressed this week by Superintendent Barbara Canavan is one of those general sentiments it's easy to agree with. Get into the specifics, though, and reality creeps in. Most people are all for local control until they disagree with the local people in control. Then they go to their state delegate or member of Congress or some other person elected to an office that isn't particularly local.
NEWS
January 7, 2012
Three schools in Baltimore are lengthening the school day based on the "success" of an expanded instruction program in New York ("Three city schools to extend day by three hours," Jan 1). What success? According to The Sun, New York's overtime students gained 2.2 percentage points in English Language Arts in three years, more than the city average of 1.5 points. Please do the math. That's a .7 percentage point difference over three years, about one quarter of a percentage point each year.
EXPLORE
October 26, 2011
On Oct. 14, Relay Elementary School hosted "Muffins with Mom. " Over 700 students and their mothers shared a muffin and juice at school. It was wonderful to see these families enjoying time together in the schoolhouse that morning! I thank my committee of teachers and support staff for their hard work in preparing for the event. I would also like to recognize manager Vicente Zeledon and owner Jeff Taylor of the Elkridge McDonald's for donating milk and juice. At Relay Elementary, we truly partner with our parents for student success!
NEWS
January 7, 2012
I think even I would strive to get my marks up if there were a threat to increase the school day by three hours ("Three city schools add 3 hours to day," Jan. 2). To "arbitrarily" increase the hours would probably rationalize my being so tired now that "I just can't get all this work done," and I'd probably do much worse. A continuous threat, however, might not only encourage me but entice my peers to blame me if the school day were increased. Just a thought! George B. Wroe, Gylndon
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Sun Staff Writer | March 23, 1994
Baltimore County students, set your alarm clocks a half-hour earlier.The school board last night voted to extend the school day by 45 minutes to make up for time lost to bad weather.At its student member's suggestion, the board voted to split the extended day by starting school a half-hour earlier than usual and ending it 15 minutes later.The decision means some high school students will be in class as early as 7:15 a.m., and they may be catching their buses as early as 5:45 a.m.The extended day will take effect April 5 and continue through May 31 -- or longer if there are any more days lost to snow.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | March 20, 1994
Carroll County Public Schools will begin implementing an extended school day tomorrow.All schools will begin classes 20 minutes before and end 30 minutes after the regular school starting and ending times.Morning kindergarten will be extended by 35 minutes, and afternoon kindergarten by 15 minutes.The extended school days will continue through May 19. This will allow the school system to make up six days lost to inclement weather.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Staff Writer | March 24, 1993
Here it is. Almost the last word on the Baltimore County's school calendar for what's left of this year:"We're going to school April 5 and 6. We're going to school June 21 and 22 -- assuming it does not snow again," Superintendent Stuart Berger said yesterday.The April days were originally scheduled as the beginning of spring break. The June days were originally scheduled for classes but were removed as part of a pay cut package the board proposed to teachers when it had to cut $6 million from the budget.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | March 14, 2014
Church Creek Elementary School was evacuated briefly Friday morning while firefighters investigated a possible gas leak. Around 8 a.m., the school's chief custodian reported an odor of gas in the boiler room at the school at 4299 Church Creek Road, according to Lindsay Bilodeau, communications specialsit for Harford County Public Schools. Per the school system's normal procedures, the building was immediately evacuated and the fire department, BGE and school system facilities crews were notified to respond to the school, Bilodeau wrote in an email.  It was determined that a pilot light was out in one of the boilers.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2014
COLLEGE PARK -- It took Nick Faust a few games of high school basketball to score 20 points for the first time. “I scored 20 when I was a sophomore at John Carroll, against Calvert Hall,” Faust, now a junior at Maryland, recalled Tuesday night.  “My junior year and senior year [at City] I scored 20 all the time.” It took until Faust's 97 th game at Maryland for the 6-foot-6 guard to reach that milestone. He did it in a 71-60 victory for the Terps over Wake Forest on Tuesday at Comcast Center .   Faust knew he had finally broken the 20-point barrier after making a breakaway dunk for points 19 and 20. “I did know when I made that dunk, I knew it was [for my 20 th point]
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2014
At their teacher's suggestion, some Centennial High School students are closing their eyes in class and taking their minds off academic subjects. They are relaxing instead of sitting tensely on the edge of their chairs. And they are thinking positive thoughts instead of stressing over a coming test, a lower-than-expected grade, or a social or emotional challenge they may be facing in one of Howard County's many top-performing schools. To help them feel grounded, they are focusing on their breathing and their feet.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | January 9, 2014
You'll feel as if you have gone through a typical school day as you walk through the Student Art Exhibit at the Columbia Art Center. Done in conjunction with the Howard County Public School System, this exhibit features numerous photographs and accompanying captions from schools throughout the county. Most of the exhibiting students take a close-up look at their own daily schedule. One of the first photos you'll encounter was taken by Shelly Walker, a 12th grader at Hammond High School.
NEWS
December 3, 2013
I am sure that there will be great criticism about Baltimore social services workers' decision to have foster kids get their diplomas in a day through a school in Philadelphia ( "Diplomas in a day," Nov. 25). While it may not be the best way for these children to get their diplomas, we need to think about why these kids are in this situation. Traditional school is not for everyone. Children in foster care are often traumatized, moving from place to place, and therefore from school to school.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
Annapolis High School student Dajuan Gay left an after-school job early Wednesday so he could petition the Anne Arundel County Board of Education for later school start time. The junior than left the board meeting to resume his regimented daily schedule - which he said usually ends with bedtime at 1 a.m. "I'm getting around four hours of sleep every night … and that's with work, homework, school track and other extracurricular activities," said Gay, whose comments to the school board culminated two hours of public testimony from students, administrators, parents and advocates, all pressing for later high school start times in Anne Arundel County.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Evening Sun Staff Reporters Monica Norton, Bruce Reid, Kevin Thomas and Norris West contributed to this story | September 27, 1990
Parents' groups, local school authorities and teachers unions give mixed grades to a proposed 20-day extension of the school year by 1995.Some voice qualified support for the 200-day school year proposed by the State Board of Education on Tuesday, saying students could benefit from the extra class time.But a number of others doubt that the state and local jurisdictions can afford the proposal's $357.4 million price tag.Still others question whether schools can do a better job simply by keeping students in school a month longer each year.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | March 10, 1996
With an extra 12 minutes, you can poach four eggs, run more than a mile or watch half a television sitcom, or you could add the equivalent of six days to the school year.Anne Arundel County school officials are studying the costs and logistics of lengthening the school day by 12 minutes, at least for high school students and maybe for all 72,000 students, to avoid a recurrence of the problem they have this year.Because of snow-related delayed arrivals, early dismissals and full days lost, high school students will be short of the state-required 1,170 instructional hours if this school year is not extended.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2013
A burst of heat and humidity prompted early school closings and electricity-saving measures across the region Wednesday, but a snap back to fall-like weather lies ahead Friday and through the weekend. Temperatures surged to highs of 95 degrees at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport and 98 degrees at the Maryland Science Center in the afternoon. High humidity made it feel as hot as 105 degrees downtown as high pressure over the eastern United States pumped warm, moist air up from the Gulf of Mexico.
NEWS
August 30, 2013
We applaud your recent editorial advocating the Baltimore City Public Schools examine extended school days as a way to boost student achievement ( "Expanding the school day," Aug. 26). Models like the Harlem Children's Zone are excellent examples of how additional instruction time can improve learning outcomes. Educators know that students who participate in extended learning opportunities get better grades, attend school at a higher rate than their peers and show improved behavior.
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