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NEWS
August 18, 2012
Kudos to the National Science Foundation and the states of Maryland and Delaware for adopting a curriculum to teach the science of global warming and climate change ("A grant to help teach climate change," Aug. 16). We need to address this issue before we witness parts of the Inner Harbor and the Eastern Shore go underwater. Some may dispute the approach, but there's no dispute among the scientific community about whether climate change represents an existential threat to the planet unless humans take drastic steps to reverse the trend.
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NEWS
October 9, 2014
Monarch Global Academy will hold open house informational sessions for prospective students on Oct. 14, Nov. 18 and Dec. 19 from 6:30 to 7:30 at the recently opened school on Brock Bridge Road in Laurel. A tuition-free public contract school, Monarch Global Academy is accepting applications for fall 2015 from students that will be entering kindergarten through sixth grade and living in the attendance areas of Brock Bridge, Maryland City and Jessup elementary schools. The application deadline is Dec. 17 at noon.
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NEWS
October 9, 2014
Monarch Global Academy will hold open house informational sessions for prospective students on Oct. 14, Nov. 18 and Dec. 19 from 6:30 to 7:30 at the recently opened school on Brock Bridge Road in Laurel. A tuition-free public contract school, Monarch Global Academy is accepting applications for fall 2015 from students that will be entering kindergarten through sixth grade and living in the attendance areas of Brock Bridge, Maryland City and Jessup elementary schools. The application deadline is Dec. 17 at noon.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2013
A couple of years ago at Slate , Farhad Manjoo posted a little rant about people who insist on typing two spaces after a period, even though in our age of computerized proportional type it is not only unnecessary but contraindicated. The article proved to be so successful at what H.L. Mencken liked to call "stirring up the animals" that Slate republished it last month . The recent results were equally gratifying. Though somewhat more literate than the "your a moron" comments one commonly encounters on the Internet, the responses nicely match intemperance with ignorance.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Evening Sun Staff | April 23, 1991
Some speakers at a public hearing last night warned against watering down a plan intended to include aspects of African and black American history and culture in the Baltimore school curriculum."
NEWS
By From staff reports | March 24, 1998
House rejects bill to add potato famine to school curriculumA bill that would have made the Irish potato famine a required part of Maryland's public school curriculum died in a House committee yesterday as delegates shied away from telling educators what to teach.The Ways and Means Committee rejected the measure after state school Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick said she would work with Irish-American groups to develop a curriculum on the famine.The bill, sponsored by Sen. Perry Sfikas, a Baltimore Democrat, had passed in the Senate.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Evening Sun Staff | September 14, 1990
The Baltimore public school system is planning to spend more than $76 million in city and state funds on capital improvements under a program presented to the school board last night.The proposal, due to be voted on next week, contains money for asbestos removal and improvements to existing schools, including roofing work.It calls for about $6 million each year in local funds, an increase of about $2 million each year in city spending on capital improvements in the schools.That increase will let the Education Department obtain an additional $16 million in state matching funds over the five-year period, according to Patsy B. Blackshear, an associate superintendent of schools.
NEWS
September 13, 1993
It's unfortunate that Baltimore's latest experiment in multicultural education is being launched just as a similar program in neighboring Washington, D.C., has come under fire for lacking intellectual integrity. School board members there were outraged recently to discover that the consultant hired to develop the city's "Afrocentric" program had misled officials about her credentials and methods.Baltimore has managed to avoid such controversy for the most part. Its multicultural program was designed as an integral part of a much larger overhaul of the school curriculum, and the increased attention given to the contributions of minorities grew out of recommendations developed by a carefully selected task force of scholars, school administrators and community leaders.
NEWS
November 2, 2012
In reporter Annie Linskey 's analysis of an opposition ad against Question 6 ("Claim about marriage referendum is disputed," Oct. 30), she concludes that consequences are not part of the decision to vote on a referendum, but part of a "broader narrative. " Her statement ignores the consequences demonstrated by the ad she criticizes were the result of a federal judge's decision permitting inclusion of same-sex marriage in the curriculum after same-sex marriage was approved in another state.
NEWS
By MARY GAIL HARE and MARY GAIL HARE,SUN REPORTER | May 28, 2006
The number of schools in Harford will grow by one this fall with the opening of the county's first charter school. Restoration Alternative Academy Public Charter School received approval from the Board of Education last week and is moving forward with plans to use six classrooms and offices in the old Aberdeen High School building. "We are really pleased with the board's decision and will be ready for September," said the Rev. Nathaniel Johnson, pastor of Aberdeen Bible Church and president of the nonprofit group backing the project.
NEWS
November 2, 2012
In reporter Annie Linskey 's analysis of an opposition ad against Question 6 ("Claim about marriage referendum is disputed," Oct. 30), she concludes that consequences are not part of the decision to vote on a referendum, but part of a "broader narrative. " Her statement ignores the consequences demonstrated by the ad she criticizes were the result of a federal judge's decision permitting inclusion of same-sex marriage in the curriculum after same-sex marriage was approved in another state.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2012
Opponents of Question 6 are airing a television commercial that claims same-sex marriage could be "taught in schools" if the law is upheld in the November election. What the ad says: The commercial features David and Tonia Parker, a Massachusetts couple who sued the school board when their son brought home a book that discussed gay married couples. A federal judge tossed out the lawsuit, saying schools are "entitled to teach anything that is reasonably related to the goals of preparing students to become engaged and productive citizens.
EXPLORE
October 24, 2012
The case for Question 6, which would affirm Maryland's law authorizing same-sex marriage, is simple. It affirms the principle that the law should treat everyone the same. Marriage is both a religious and a civil institution. Churches, synagogues and mosques have always set their own rules about which marriages they recognize, and this law does not change that fact. What it does is to ensure that no Marylander faces discrimination under the law when it comes to one of the state's fundamental institutions.
NEWS
August 18, 2012
Kudos to the National Science Foundation and the states of Maryland and Delaware for adopting a curriculum to teach the science of global warming and climate change ("A grant to help teach climate change," Aug. 16). We need to address this issue before we witness parts of the Inner Harbor and the Eastern Shore go underwater. Some may dispute the approach, but there's no dispute among the scientific community about whether climate change represents an existential threat to the planet unless humans take drastic steps to reverse the trend.
HEALTH
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2010
The Baltimore City Council's education committee assembled school officials, the health commissioner and fitness advocates on Thursday to discuss a trend emerging in city schools: While students are meeting state standards in their physical education requirements, they're also getting fatter. During a committee hearing at City Hall, city and school leaders explored ways that the school system could strengthen its current standards of physical activity and health instruction to combat the growing trend of childhood obesity and Type 2 diabetes, which half of the city's students born after the year 2000 are at risk for. "This is so important in the lives of our children, who are dying before their parents," said City Councilwoman Agnes Welch, a longtime advocate of combating childhood obesity.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman | laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | November 30, 2009
Comptroller Peter Franchot has been going back to high school as part of his push for requiring that seniors take a course in financial literacy in order to graduate. The proposal for a graduation requirement has met with resistance from lawmakers and educators who are wary of imposing curriculum mandates, but Franchot said the recent recession has convinced him that basic personal finance concepts must be taught. Franchot, the state's chief tax collector, has visited seven high schools since the school year began and plans to push for legislation during the General Assembly session that begins in January.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff Writer | May 18, 1992
A task force looking at black student achievement in the county's school system recommends that more works by blacks be worked into the curriculum and that teachers be required to take a course in black culture.The report of the Task Force for Black Male Achievement will be discussed at tonight's Board of Education meeting, at 7:30 at board headquarters, 2644 Riva Road.The task force of community leaders, clergy and school officials suggests that more works by blacks in the areas of social studies, math, arts, language arts, music and science be included in the school curriculum.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2012
Opponents of Question 6 are airing a television commercial that claims same-sex marriage could be "taught in schools" if the law is upheld in the November election. What the ad says: The commercial features David and Tonia Parker, a Massachusetts couple who sued the school board when their son brought home a book that discussed gay married couples. A federal judge tossed out the lawsuit, saying schools are "entitled to teach anything that is reasonably related to the goals of preparing students to become engaged and productive citizens.
NEWS
September 6, 2009
That's not schooling As a former teacher in both public and private schools and, presently, as an advisory teacher for a well-known home schooling program, I was dismayed by the article, "Where whatever children do is schooling" (Sept. 3). I disagree that children can guide their own learning without some type of structure or curriculum. Most parents, I believe, would find teaching their children in this manner incredibly challenging, to say the least. No one can argue that reading to children isn't enormously beneficial, but only a few children will learn to read just from this method, nor will they necessarily learn to read or do math via video games.
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