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School Crowding

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By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Evening Sun Staff | March 18, 1991
Baltimore County Executive Roger B. Hayden this week will take his first detailed look at the problem of new home construction in areas with crowded schools.A law that temporarily bans building in such areas expires next Jan. 1.Hayden has scheduled a meeting with planners this week to discuss the situation as school officials predict that crowding will worsen in the next four or five years.Meanwhile, the number of proposed houses delayed by the law that was enacted under then-County Executive Dennis F. Rasmussen slowly mounts.
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November 2, 2011
Regarding the proposal to build a new elementary school in either Mays Chapel or Dulaney Springs, I believe there is a better solution to the York Road corridor overcrowding issue then building a school in either of the proposed locations. The solution should be the soon-to-be-vacant Carver Center for the Arts and Technology in Towson. In the near term, it will be used to house the Stoneleigh students while their facility undergoes an addition and refurbishment. But after that, Carver can be refurbished — and an addition added, if required —then become the new Towson East Elementary School.
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NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | August 10, 1994
Hampstead residents urged the Town Council last night to take action to help prevent area school crowding from worsening."We have a situation where we're growing faster than ever before," resident John Springer told the council. "I think it's prudent to consider slowing down development until we have a feel for whether the [proposed] new schools are going to be built and when."Mr. Springer's remarks were greeted with applause from the approximately 60 people at the meeting.Despite the residents' comments relating to school crowding, Councilman Wayne Thomas' proposal to halt development in the town failed to reach a council vote because it wasn't seconded.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2011
At Stoneleigh Elementary School south of Towson, classrooms are too crowded to hold all the students, so many classes are held in portable trailers parked outside. It's a common problem in Baltimore County's York Road corridor, where trailers are being used at eight of the 12 elementary schools from Stoneleigh to the Pennsylvania line. Now, county school officials are poised to offer some creative solutions — including moving Stoneleigh students more than a mile away to a school on the other side of Towson, and building a new school in Mays Chapel.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Sun Staff Writer | October 14, 1994
Outcomes-based education has emerged as the key issue in the Carroll County school board race, but in the southeast county, that topic takes a back seat to school crowding.Questions about what school board candidates would do to lobby for building more schools -- or fewer houses -- dominated a forum sponsored by the Carrolltowne Elementary School PTA last night."What can you do that we wouldn't be able to do for ourselves?" asked Marian Sleeper, president of the Sykesville Middle School PTA.Although the candidates were supportive of more school construction, they acknowledged that the county commissioners and the state control the purse strings.
NEWS
January 4, 1994
Snapshots from a state full of crowded schools:* Anne Arundel County is weighing whether to revive double sessions in the Broadneck community until its high school gets enlarged.* In Carroll County, schools with large classes of 30 students or more jumped substantially at the elementary and high school levels.* Howard County is bracing for the state's largest boom in enrollment, projecting about a third more students just eight years from now.* Baltimore County recently moved to disallow new homes in roughly a quarter of the county where schools are too crowded, while the County Council asked the school board to use more trailer-type classrooms as a quick fix.Welcome to the issue of the '90s throughout suburban Maryland: School crowding.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun reporter | June 1, 2008
Although Howard County will, for the second consecutive year, have no elementary or middle schools crowded enough to trigger development delays under county growth-control laws, there are problems on the horizon, according to the annual enrollment charts submitted to the County Council. The charts show again a sharp departure from the decade's start, when large swaths of the county were closed to development because of crowding under the county's Adequate Public Facilities Ordinance. The law delays development around schools with projected enrollments over 115 percent of building capacity three years into the future.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 19, 1999
Superintendent Carol S. Parham has postponed announcing her 20-year plan to handle school crowding until the school board meeting at 10 a.m. June 2 in Annapolis.Parham had planned to unveil her plan at the board's regular meeting tonight. A spokesman said she needed extra time to finish her response to an independent consultant's report that recommended options for coping with population shifts in middle and high school districts.The consultant's report, which was presented to the school board in February, said that by 2007, there will be 23,700 high school students, 1,400 more than in 1997.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | April 30, 1999
A Howard County councilman is hoping to cut off approvals for new home developments June 7 to prevent more school crowding in the booming Ellicott City area -- raising developers' ire.Christopher J. Merdon, a Republican, said he plans to introduce a resolution at Monday night's council meeting that he hopes will be approved and take effect a month earlier than the law requires.The county's adequate public facilities ordinance was to invoke the same kind of ban in northeast Howard County starting July 6 -- a process Merdon's bill would short-circuit.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | October 16, 2001
Anne Arundel County Council members were expected to withdraw at a meeting last night a development bill that would have limited residential building in some neighborhoods, many with attractive waterfront views. But Councilwoman Barbara D. Samorajczyk, an Annapolis Democrat and co-sponsor of the bill, introduced similar legislation last night intended to replace the original bill. Samorajczyk was not available for comment late last night because the council meeting was still in session.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2011
The number of Howard County schools in danger of overcrowding has doubled in the past year, with most along the U.S. 1 corridor where the county has sought to spur redevelopment, according to a report awaiting submission to the County Council. That means not only unhappy parents and teachers, but potential delays in building homes along the county's oldest commercial corridor under growth-control laws that curb development around schools that are 15 percent or more over their rated capacity.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2010
Like a legislative version of the decade's greatest hits, the Howard County Council is to vote on nearly every hot-button issue the county is facing before ending its legislative season Thursday. The council heard witnesses on a range of topics — from land-use issues involving the downtown Columbia plan and Doughoregan Manor to a major new tennis facility, school crowding and residential wind turbines — until nearly midnight Monday. Council members finished the hearing Tuesday afternoon.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2010
Crowded classrooms will delay new development in Ellicott City and Elkridge, based on the latest school enrollment projections used to regulate Howard County growth. The projected crowding will trigger delays in planning for new homes in the redeveloping U.S. 1 corridor until two new schools and an addition are built. A new 600-seat elementary school and a 97-seat addition at Bellows Spring Elementary are to open in the northeast region by 2013, with a new middle school by 2015.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV | john-john.williams@baltsun.com | March 21, 2010
Public testimony was split evenly last week over whether Howard County should negotiate an agreement with a developer that would allow construction of 325 homes at historic Doughoregan Manor while preserving most of the Colonial estate's remaining land. "We heard a lot of good testimony on both sides of the issue," said County Council Chairwoman Courtney Watson. She said the council will hold a work session Monday to address concerns raised during the testimony. Watson and the rest of the council heard from more than 50 people Monday and Tuesday nights about plans for the estate in Ellicott City.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun reporter | June 1, 2008
Although Howard County will, for the second consecutive year, have no elementary or middle schools crowded enough to trigger development delays under county growth-control laws, there are problems on the horizon, according to the annual enrollment charts submitted to the County Council. The charts show again a sharp departure from the decade's start, when large swaths of the county were closed to development because of crowding under the county's Adequate Public Facilities Ordinance. The law delays development around schools with projected enrollments over 115 percent of building capacity three years into the future.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,Sun Reporter | May 14, 2008
Baltimore County Council members looked yesterday at buying police officers fewer new flashlights and sending less trash out of the county. But it remained unclear whether proposed cuts in the $2.58 billion budget would be enough to address school crowding, fund an agricultural center and pay for salary increases of some police officers. Council members are scheduled to look at cuts recommended by the county auditor in the school and community budgets tomorrow. "It's a relatively lean budget," said Council Chairman Kevin Kamenetz.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2002
Harford County's Board of Education meets tonight to vote on the thorny issue of redistricting in the Bel Air area, and while members are unsure of the outcome, some say moving students is inevitable. "There will be redistricting of some sort," said Eugene C. Chandler, board president. "It should have been done a long time ago, but there's no use crying over spilled milk. We did not have a plan." Last month, school administrators presented the board with a 15-point plan for "balancing enrollment," which would move students over several years from three crowded central-county schools: Forest Hill Elementary, Southampton Middle and C. Milton Wright High schools.
NEWS
By JOSH MITCHELL AND LIZ F. KAY and JOSH MITCHELL AND LIZ F. KAY,SUN REPORTERS | December 19, 2005
Pointing to the example of an elementary school that opened with 200 more pupils than it was built to hold, Baltimore County Council members are looking to strengthen a law that is designed to cut off residential development near crowded schools. The council is to vote tonight on a bill that would prohibit homes from being built if they, along with other planned developments, would lead to a school exceeding its capacity by 15 percent. Under the current adequate facilities law, the county could approve two residential projects that, individually, would not cause a school to become crowded, even if the combined effect of the two plans would be to raise school enrollment to more than 115 percent of capacity.
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