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By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Evening Sun Staff | July 23, 1991
School crime in Baltimore rose 41.8 percent in the 1990-91 school year, as authorities logged a total of 2,193 felonies and misdemeanors in the city schools, compared with 1,547 a year before.But school officials say serious crimes -- including those involving guns or drugs -- decreased during the 1990-91 school year. The overall rise in crime was caused by an increase in less serious offenses such as trespassing, common assaults and minor thefts, school officials say."Our average offenses have gone up, but it's been mostly in the area of what we call 'misdemeanor crimes,' " says Douglas J. Neilson, school department spokesman.
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NEWS
By Meredith Cohn | January 10, 2010
There are three main areas in public health that need continued vigilance, said Dr. Peter L. Beilenson, now Howard County's health officer after serving as Baltimore's health commissioner for 13 years. The first is substance abuse, which has led to much of the violence in Baltimore. Next is a lack of primary care, contributing to obesity, diabetes and heart disease in the city. Third is the city kids' preparedness for school, including immunizations. "[Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake]
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NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1999
An aggressive zero tolerance approach toward crime in Baltimore public schools has slashed the number of disruptive incidents and violence by as much as 70 percent in some of the city's most troubled schools, according to statistics released this week.Data from the city's 180 schools show crime overall was down 31 percent and arrests were down almost two-thirds in September and October, compared with the same months last year."Zero tolerance simply means acts are not going to be ignored; they are going to be addressed one way or another," said School Police Chief Leonard Hamm.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 5, 1998
The number of arrests in Baltimore schools dropped 45 percent from the first half to the second half of the school year, city school police say.Officers made 585 arrests in city schools in the four-month period ending Dec. 31, and 320 arrests from January to April, said School Police Chief Leonard Hamm.His report on school crime, released this week, also showed a 10.7 percent drop in school crime, including handgun possession, theft and property destruction.Hamm said no specific changes were made in disciplinary or arrest policies to caused the drop.
NEWS
July 25, 1991
It speaks volumes about the extent to which violence has permeated our society that there is now such a phenomenon as "school crime" -- assaults, rapes, robberies and vandalism that occur in the classrooms and hallways where young people are supposed to be learning the values and behavior that will carry them into adulthood.The newest statistics on school crime in Baltimore city show that crime has skyrocketed overall -- 2,193 felonies and misdemeanors occurred during the 1990-91 academic year compared with 1,547 the year before.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Staff Writer | June 17, 1993
Sparked by a 16.4 percent student dropout rate last year -- more than three times the 5.2 percent rate statewide -- the Baltimore school system is revamping its vocational education curriculum and making other reforms that might retain students, the city schools superintendent, Walter G. Amprey, said yesterday.Dr. Amprey said he shook up the school system's vocational education office earlier this week because it had failed to offer alternative programs to students, many of whom end up dropping out of school because they are bored with academics.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1999
Larry Burgan, the widely respected former chief of the Baltimore city school police and a gun control advocate, died of a heart attack Thursday at Franklin Square Hospital Center. He was 68 and lived in Perry Hall.Mr. Burgan, whose tenure coincided with a rise in school crime, was considered a national expert in his field. He argued that metal detectors were not an effective deterrent to school crime.He attributed school violence to the streets and neighborhoods around them."It is misleading to suggest that school problems with firearms can be considered apart from the very obvious problems in society," wrote Mr. Burgan in a 1986 newspaper article.
NEWS
By JEAN THOMPSON and JEAN THOMPSON,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1995
The Baltimore school system's patchwork approach to curbing crime has failed to reduce a growing problem of student violence, a grand jury has concluded.After a four-month study of school crime, the grand jury said the district's safety programs at individual schools provide only a "piecemeal" solution and should be expanded citywide."What we are suggesting is they are good but not enough," said Nancy A. Miller, the chairwoman of the grand jury's subcommittee on school crime. In addition, the school system needs stronger and clearer policies for handling student misconduct, and a larger school police force, the jurors recommended.
NEWS
By Jean Thompson and Jean Thompson,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1995
Baltimore schools -- whose efforts to curb student violence have not been adequate, according to a recent grand jury -- saw more gun-related crimes last year than many larger urban school systems, a comparison of annual crime reports shows.The contrast to other of the nation's cities comes as Baltimore school officials report a sharp increase in crime overall and of incidents involving deadly weapons. Critics point to a lack of a comprehensive program locally -- and other cities to the lack of widespread use of metal detectors -- to deal with crime and weapon possession in the classroom.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,Sun Staff Writer | April 25, 1995
In one of her first major campaign thrusts last week, challenger Mary Pat Clarke lobbed several political bombs at Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke. Among other things, Mrs. Clarke declared that "under the Schmoke administration, schools are more violent and dangerous for children and teachers."That may be provable if you look at school police reports. In most categories, school crime has increased during Mr. Schmoke's watch. Nationally, crime in schools is a major problem. Nearly 3 million crimes occur in or near schools every year -- 16,000 a day, one every six seconds.
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