Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSchool Construction
IN THE NEWS

School Construction

NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
Baltimore County plans to overhaul its elementary school buildings to add more than 1,700 seats in its central and southwestern neighborhoods, where overcrowding has pushed students and teachers into portable classrooms and hallways for their lessons. The proposal announced Wednesday by schools Superintendent Dallas Dance calls for reopening Loch Raven Elementary and moving Catonsville Elementary to the Bloomsbury Community Center as well as additions and renovations at other sites.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 28, 2013
Baltimore City's interim schools chief, Tishsa Edwards, says the $10,000 "retention stipends" being given to seven top system administrators are needed as an incentive to keep the team of her predecessor, Andrés Alonso, intact until June, when a permanent schools CEO is scheduled to be named. But that's a lot of money for staffers who are already quite well paid for their services, and it raises the question of why they should need more to continue doing their jobs. Put another way, what exactly is the public getting for the money it's shelling out to keep a handful of managers at their desks for the next eight months?
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
Facing criticism from a struggling local business, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake defended the city's bottle tax Tuesday as essential to rebuilding Baltimore's schools. But the mayor acknowledged she would have to suspend a program that delivers fresh produce to poor neighborhoods because of the closing of the supermarket, Santoni's. Santoni's, an 83-year-old Highlandtown grocer, announced this week it would close its doors at the end of this month solely because of the city's bottled-beverage tax. Rob Santoni Jr., the company's chief financial officer, said he is in talks to bring in another supermarket and plans to run for a House of Delegates seat in Baltimore County to give small businesses a stronger voice in Annapolis.
NEWS
By Matthew D. Gallagher | October 6, 2013
Baltimore is on the cusp of making once unimaginable progress in modernizing its obsolete public school facilities with more than $1 billion in investment over the next 10 years. Broad coalitions of supporters, feasible financing plans and the adoption of needed accountability systems, along with the alignment of civic and elected leadership sustained through the legislative process, helped achieve this potentially game-changing outcome. Such a hard-won victory illustrates what is possible and should galvanize our community to act on another of the city's biggest challenges: Baltimore's 16,000 vacant properties.
NEWS
By Davin Hong | July 18, 2013
The $1.2 billion approved by the Maryland General Assembly for city school construction is a historic opportunity for transformation in Baltimore. But if, after 10 years, the outcome is just new schools, we will have missed a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to affect not only schools but entire neighborhoods. As an architect, I believe in the value of good facilities and their ability to create healthy environments that promote learning. But better buildings alone are not enough to restore communities.
SPORTS
By Seth Boster and The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2013
For only the third time since 1980, the Maryland Public Secondary Schools Athletic Association state championships for cross country will not take place at Hereford this fall. In a phone call Friday afternoon, MPSSAA executive director Ned Sparks said he received an email last week from Hereford saying that the well-reputed three-mile course on the school's rural Parkton campus was being affected by ongoing school construction. "They held out as long as they could, and they thought that they might be able to pull it off, but they just said, 'Hey, at this time, in the interest of fairness, we're gonna pull the plug now, so we can make alternate plans rather than wait a week or two before," Sparks said.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2013
School may be out for students, but it's definitely in for building crews as they near completion on the latest elementary school in the Howard County district — a $34 million, 10-acre, two-story facility in Elkridge that's scheduled to open in time for the coming school year. County officials say the 600 students at Ducketts Lane Elementary will enroll in one of Howard's most environmentally sophisticated school buildings, with hands-on offerings that help make the facility a teaching tool at virtually every turn.
NEWS
By Yara Cheikh | June 2, 2013
Baltimore County Public Schools resemble Baltimore City Public Schools in that both have aging infrastructures and many of the schools are not air conditioned, but there are major differences in enrollment trends and available local funding. While Baltimore City has had a net loss of students over decades, Baltimore County has experienced major increases in student enrollment, requiring additional seats. County public school enrollment was approximately 81,000 in 1979, is 108,000 today, and is projected to exceed 120,000 in the next decade.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2013
Baltimore schools chief Andrés Alonso went to Annapolis last year seeking approval for a bold $2 billion plan to replace many of the city system's crumbling buildings. The idea didn't even make it out of committee. Prospects still looked bleak in January when the Senate president described the financial package as "ridiculous. " But by the end of the legislative session in April, a $1 billion version of the proposal had cleared both chambers by overwhelming margins. The plan - signed into law Thursday by Gov. Martin O'Malley - went from ridiculous to reality because of hard work by scores of people in both Baltimore and Annapolis, and a host of political forces were in play.
NEWS
May 10, 2013
County Executive Kevin Kamenetz deserves thanks for his leadership on the new school in Mays Chapel. It's disheartening to see baby boomers, most of whom benefited from public education (and a boom in school construction), refuse to support the needs of today's children. As the county grows, officials must choose between "infill" - building densely in existing neighborhoods and filling in greenspace within developed neighborhoods - or expanding into the outer suburbs. Infill is almost always the right choice, leading to stronger communities, reduced traffic congestion and preservation of greenspace farther out in the county.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.