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by Annie Linskey | January 9, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley will ask for $350 million in school construction funds in next year's budget, an increase of $40 million, according to a spokeswoman. The governor will announce the funds Tuesday at morning event in Annapolis. He will be joined by House Speaker Michael E. Busch, who has been pushing for an aggressive capital budget to jolt construction jobs in the state. The backdrop for the event will be familiar: Germantown Elementary School in Annapolis. During the 2006 campaign, O'Malley held a news conference at the school to pledge $1 billion in funding if he was elected.
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NEWS
October 13, 2014
In the second televised debate of the Maryland gubernatorial campaign, Republican Larry Hogan continued to hammer Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown with his charge that, as part of the O'Malley administration, the Democrat has presided over the ruination of Maryland's economy. Mr. Hogan repeated his contention that tax increases to fuel runaway spending in Annapolis had driven thousands of residents and small businesses out of state, stagnated growth and doubled unemployment. Mr. Brown argued about many of the specific points Mr. Hogan raised, to be sure, but he did not disagree with the basic point that Maryland's economy needs a jump start.
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NEWS
June 10, 2010
In our recent report, "Buildings for Academic Excellence," the ACLU of Maryland credits the state government, particularly in the last four years, for increasing funding for school construction. That is a significant trend that ought to continue. The ACLU is well aware of the need to upgrade school buildings in many counties across Maryland and has worked in state coalitions, and with leaders like Baltimore County Executive Jim Smith, toward that end. The question is one of scale and local resources.
NEWS
October 13, 2014
Here are the facts behind some of the claims made by Republican Larry Hogan and Democrat Anthony Brown in their second televised debate: Maryland's 2013 gun law: During the debate, Hogan said the only problem he had with the gun bill was that it didn't go far enough to help guns out of the hands of the mentally ill. That appears to be at odds with comments he made during the primary. At a June 12 GOP candidate forum, Hogan was asked what could be done about the new law, also Senate Bill 281. At the time, Hogan said: "It think it's unlikely that it's going to be repealed given that the Democrats in the legislature just rammed it through.
NEWS
June 10, 2010
I was pleased to see the commentary by David Lever in the June 10 Sunpaper regarding the debate over the funding amount and distribution for school construction and renovation in the State of Maryland ("School facilities' foundation of fairness"). I was also pleased to see the support of the IAC (Interagency Committee on School Construction). As an entity, this committee has been in place for almost 40 years. In my past positions in three metro area counties, I have worked with them for 25 years, asking for state support for projects in those counties.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2012
A Baltimore delegate plans to introduce legislation to create an authority to oversee a new stream of school construction money that the city would get under a plan envisioned by schools CEO Andrés Alonso. Del. Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. said his bill would trigger a referendum in which city voters would be asked to create the Baltimore City Schools Construction Authority. If voters approved, the authority would administer a lump sum that the state would provide to the city each year to meet school construction needs.
NEWS
January 30, 2014
Your recent editorial pooh-poohing expanding to other counties the innovative school construction model the legislature approved for Baltimore City missed the mark by a wide margin ("School construction apples and oranges," Jan. 14). I didn't vote for the Baltimore plan because the city is a special case (although, in some other important ways, it is). I voted for it because the plan made fiscal, educational and economic sense for taxpayers and for kids. The state school construction program, a progressive innovation in the 1970s when Governor Marvin Mandel and the legislature created it, needs updating.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2011
Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz said Thursday afternoon that his school construction requests for the fiscal year starting this summer recognize the need for spending restraint in difficult times, but he said the same economic challenges "make the education of our future work force and leaders more important than ever," according to his prepared remarks. The executive's annual message to the 15-member planning board on capital spending for 2012 offered highlights of a $670 million spending plan.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2013
Some Baltimore legislators, determined to win state approval of the city's ambitious plan to launch a $2.4 billion, 10-year overhaul of the state's aging school facilities, are actively considering bringing in the Maryland Stadium Authority to provide construction expertise and financial oversight. The lawmakers' concern is that some state leaders who are otherwise sympathetic to the plight of Baltimore schoolchildren have concerns that the city school system lacks the ability on its own to manage a project of that scope.
EXPLORE
June 22, 2011
The latest school facilities construction plan, which was presented to the Harford County Board of Education during its meeting June 13, shows once again that the school system and the county government are not on the same page when it comes to planning future school construction. The plan ranks the Homestead Wakefield Elementary reconstruction as the first priority, followed by construction of a new John Archer School, which would be built as an addition to Bel Air Middle. Next in line behind those two will be the renovation or reconstruction of Youth's Benefit Elementary in Fallston, followed by the reconstruction of William Paca/Old Post Road Elementary in Abingdon.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
Republican Larry Hogan denounced Democrat Anthony G. Brown's handling of Maryland's health exchange Monday during their second televised debate, calling the website a "complete disaster. " Brown refused to give in, acknowledging that the launch went poorly but pointing to 400,000 Marylanders who obtained health coverage and statistics showing a drop in uncompensated care at Maryland hospitals. He said the state has become one of the most competitive markets in the country. "We rolled up our sleeves and got it done," Brown said of the state's efforts to correct the website's problems.
NEWS
October 8, 2014
The most provocative new line of attack Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown made against businessman Larry Hogan during this week's debate was that the Republican nominee plans to cut $450 million from school construction if he's elected. Is this true? Absolutely not, Mr. Hogan says. But the fact that there is some basis to Mr. Brown's claim points to a flaw with Mr. Hogan's campaign - and the fact that Mr. Brown is exploiting it in the way he is points to the hollowness of this race. Mr. Brown got the $450 million figure from Mr. Hogan's plan for achieving savings in state government spending.
NEWS
By Gregory E. Thornton | August 25, 2014
Editor's note: This op-ed has been updated to correct the number of chronically absent city students.  As the new school year starts in Baltimore City, I want to express my gratitude for the opportunity to build on the work that has been done in the past, and lead the school district and its students and families on the journey to excellence. I applaud the Baltimore City Board of School Commissioners, elected officials at every level of government, and our school families and communities for their staunch support of city schools throughout the education reform process in Baltimore.
NEWS
August 9, 2014
How ironic that Kevin Kamenetz suddenly is "on the side of the taxpayers - and good common sense!" ( "Kamenetz trumps Dance," Aug. 4.) And what a shame that many of these critical issues were not deemed to be important in previous circumstances! Where was this common sense when the citizens of Mays Chapel implored the county executive, County Council and the school system to solve the central corridor school overcrowding problems in ways that included: converting Cromwell Valley to a neighborhood elementary school rather than a magnet school, using unused local school seats to avoid creation of a commuter school, protecting the community from a dangerous onslaught of excess traffic, saving 10 acres of beautiful forested parkland, and selecting far more cost effective ways of creating additional school seats?
NEWS
August 4, 2014
Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz has shown no shyness in the past about standing behind the school system's construction and renovation plans in the face of community opposition - case in point, his infamous "my job to talk, yours to listen" press conference at the ground breaking for a new elementary school in Mays Chapel last year. Yet on Friday he authored a sweeping re-write of Superintendent Dallas Dance's plans for additions, modernization and new construction involving three elementary schools and a middle school in the greater Towson area, plans that had drawn community opposition for everything from traffic to the destruction of century-old trees.
NEWS
June 25, 2014
Twelve years ago, when the General Assembly was debating the enactment of the Thornton school funding formula that has done so much to support the advances of Baltimore's schools in recent years, the city's delegation in Annapolis included 10 senators and 29 delegates. Among them were the chairs of the budget committees in both the House and the Senate, plus a number of other committee chairs and top leaders in both chambers. During the next General Assembly term, the legislature is due to revisit the Thornton formula, but thanks to population losses and the sharp curtailment at court order of districts that cross the city-county line, Baltimore's delegation will have six senators (only five of whom will live in the city)
NEWS
By Erica L. Green | February 17, 2012
The Baltimore city school board voted Tuesday to pass a resolution that supports the plan proposed by schools CEO Andres Alonso to execute a rapid and massive overhaul of the city's debilitating school facilities by borrowing $1.2 billion--six times more than the school system's current bonding authority, and an amount that far exceeds the $300 milllion plan proposed by the mayor. The plan is notably different than the one proposed by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, who has remained non-commital since Alonso appeared in Annapolis.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2012
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake expressed concerns about her schools chief's proposal to borrow $1.2 billion to fix Baltimore's crumbling school buildings, touting her own more modest plan as realistic in her State of the City address Monday. The mayor said she would introduce legislation next week to increase the city's bottle tax from 2 cents to 5 cents in 2013, a source of revenue that is key to her plan to leverage $300 million in bonds to address an estimated $2.8 billion in needed repairs to schools.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
County schools will launch the new academic year Aug. 25, but parents seeking to enroll their children in the district's new contract school should also pay attention to another date: June 18. That's the day school officials say it needs all funding in place for Monarch Global Academy Public Contract School, which is scheduled to open in August in the Laurel area. The $5.8 million that officials say they need for Monarch Global was not specifically earmarked in County Executive Laura Neuman's budget proposal to the County Council.
NEWS
By Mary K. Tilghman, mtilghman@tribune.com | May 13, 2014
Public education - the new hybrid school board, school safety and overcrowding - dominated discussions among the three candidates for the 42nd District's state Senate seat. Just six weeks before the primary, incumbent Sen. Jim Brochin, a Democrat of Towson, Democrat Connie DeJuliis, of Glen Arm, who represented Dundalk in the House of Delegates for one term in the 1990s, and Republican Tim Robinson, a physician from Timonium, faced off at the Idlewylde Community Center. Brochin, who is seeking his fourth term, will face DeJuliis in the Democratic primary election June 24. The winner will face Robinson in the general election Nov. 4. All three candidates told the audience of about 25 that they believe these issues were better handled by county officials, but promised their support.
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