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NEWS
By Peter Hermann | March 30, 2012
UPDATE: Seeking to end a spate of playground fights that authorities said escalated into a near drowning and a child's head being forced onto a railroad track in Morrell Park, Baltimore police officers went into an elementary school Thursday and took four young children out in handcuffs. But news of three 9-year-old girls and an 8-year-old boy shackled inside a school and then held in a juvenile detention center nicknamed “Baby Booking” for nearly 12 hours has riled some parents and raised questions about whether the arrests were proper under state law. “There was no need to handcuff children,” said Michael Vogel, the grandfather of one of the girls who was arrested.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 29, 2014
Like turning a battleship around in the ocean, steering unsafe public behavior in a different direction can seem an agonizingly slow process. When the behavior is intolerable, it is all the more frustrating. This is the case with the frequency of a dangerous traffic violation — drivers blowing past school buses that are stopped to pick up or drop off school children. In 2011, the Maryland State Department of Education began an annual survey. On a single school day in spring, the department asked school bus drivers to keep count of each violation he or she observed.
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NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | November 28, 2000
With the help of a hefty state grant, middle school children who are below grade level or have yet to pass the Maryland Functional Tests in reading or math will receive help after school or over the summer. The Howard County school system recently received more than $400,000 from the State Department of Education to help improve achievement levels of pupils in the middle grades. School districts that received portions of the Maryland Academic Intervention and Support Program grant were given license to use the money any way local officials saw fit, provided it helped middle school children in reading and math.
NEWS
August 26, 2014
There are so many unanswered questions here, I don't know where to start. Maryland has welcomed thousands of unaccompanied children who crossed the border this summer and now it's time taxpayer are told how much this will cost ( "Maryland schools see influx of immigrants from Central America Aug. 24). Our school system is in already in trouble yet it will need to integrate thousands of kids who don't speak English, have been traumatized and appear to lack the most basic educational skills.
NEWS
November 26, 2012
Everyone knows that these speed cameras have nothing to do with safety and everything to do with generating revenue ("Fast money," Nov. 18). Where are all of the millions of dollars that these cameras are generating actually going? Some of these so-called "safety" cameras are located on major roads. Roads that are not in the immediate vicinity of a school or school crossing where school children or any pedestrian, for that matter, ever walks or crosses! I have to laugh every time I drive past a speed camera.
NEWS
March 14, 2012
In response to letter writer Susan Brown, I would like to offer her an invitation to visit Mays Chapel Park so she can get an idea what is involved ("Mays Chapel school would be an asset to the area," March 11). First, she will not see many school children in the area during the day, nor many school buses since it is an adult community around the park, and most people are retired. Second, she will see a 20-acre park that is busy this week because there are lacrosse games going on for school children from all over the area.
NEWS
August 21, 1992
You have to admire Whittle Communications, the promoter of the in-school television program known as Channel One. For cash-strapped school systems, Whittle makes an offer that is hard to refuse: Use our 12-minute newscast every school day and we'll supply your system with satellite dishes, video recorders and television sets.Baltimore City's resource-poor school system has signed up with Whittle. This fall, Channel One will premiere in all of the city's middle and high school classrooms. Every morning, Whittle will deliver by satellite a 10-minute news program with two minutes of ads to each of these classrooms.
NEWS
March 8, 1994
During the past two months of blizzards, ice storms and generally foul winter weather, Carroll's school children have had only one week of uninterrupted classes. This adverse weather has played havoc with the school calendar, as most Carroll parents well know. The closings have forced the system's school administrators -- barring any future ice storm or blizzard -- to extend the school year into the last week of June. Less noticed, however, is the devasting impact of the weather on the rhythm of learning in the classrooms.
NEWS
By MAUREEN RICE | January 18, 1994
My daughter is praying that Mommy and Daddy win the sweepstakes or hit the big one in the lottery.There is a reason for this, of course. It's undeniable that some people are luckier than others, or for some reason seem to have their prayers answered more frequently than most.So, for example, I know who to blame for all this wonderful winter weather and the ache in my back from shoveling the driveway: my daughter.Right before Christmas she walked around the house saying, "I wish we would have snow for Christmas."
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | May 3, 2012
Editor: In Wednesday's edition of The Aegis , County Executive [David R.] Craig attempted to defend his seemingly indefensible decision to waste $40 million on an EOC [911 center] replacement. He stated the EOC, "Is outdated, in dire need of replacement, not repairs. "  He also quoted his facilities chief stating, "The current EOC facility as a whole is in a state of failure and overall conditions range from inadequate to unsafe. " Rather than providing meaningful insight, Mr. Craig's double-speak leads me to further questions. What are the specific failures and inadequacies?
NEWS
August 9, 2014
How ironic that Kevin Kamenetz suddenly is "on the side of the taxpayers - and good common sense!" ( "Kamenetz trumps Dance," Aug. 4.) And what a shame that many of these critical issues were not deemed to be important in previous circumstances! Where was this common sense when the citizens of Mays Chapel implored the county executive, County Council and the school system to solve the central corridor school overcrowding problems in ways that included: converting Cromwell Valley to a neighborhood elementary school rather than a magnet school, using unused local school seats to avoid creation of a commuter school, protecting the community from a dangerous onslaught of excess traffic, saving 10 acres of beautiful forested parkland, and selecting far more cost effective ways of creating additional school seats?
NEWS
By R. Bennett Furlow | May 13, 2014
The kidnapping of 276 Nigerian school girls by the Boko Haram insurgency has finally drawn attention to the group's murderous, five-year-long crusade, which, unlike attacks by Islamist militants elsewhere, has largely focused on school children. In September of last year, Boko Haram raiders attacked a college dormitory at 1 a.m., killing 44 students and teachers. Last July they killed 42 people, mainly students, in a pre-dawn raid on a school. In February, they attacked a boarding school in northern Nigeria in the middle of the night, killing 59 boys.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and By Andrea K. Walker | February 18, 2014
The number of children in Maryland with untreated tooth decay dropped 41 percent from 2001 to 2011, according to a new state report. The assessment of children in kindergarten and third grade  was conducted by the University of Maryland School of Dentistry on behalf of the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene Office of Oral Health. The overall oral health status of Maryland children improved over the last decade, the report found. Researchers said the improvement came after reforms adopted when a 12-year-old from Prince George's County child died because of a preventable tooth infection.
NEWS
December 20, 2013
The problems with Baltimore's speed camera program ran much deeper than the issues The Sun describes with the two vendors who operated the cameras and administered the issuance of citations ("City plans to buy out camera contract," Dec. 17). First, the law permitting speed cameras in "school zones" was well-intentioned and allowed the placement of cameras a considerable distance from schools as an aid to enforcing school zone speed limits and assuring the safety of children in the vicinity of schools.
NEWS
December 20, 2013
Baltimore school officials are putting the best face possible on what can only be called a disappointing performance by city students on a rigorous national exam that tests proficiency in reading and math. Though city students scored small gains in reading, only 14 percent of fourth-graders and 16 percent of eighth-graders were performing at grade-level, while math scores remained flat or declined slightly. Just 13 percent of city eighth-graders and 19 percent of fourth-graders scored proficient on the math exam.
NEWS
October 18, 2013
To pretend that Vi Ripken's experiences are a statistical fluke is to miss yet another opportunity to come to grip with the reality we all need to face ("Aberdeen perplexed by attacks on Vi Ripken," Oct. 16). These upsetting criminal acts are not a statistical anomaly. Ms. Ripken's alleged attacker, Jesse Bowen, has reportedly had 12 prior arrests, four of which resulted in convictions, and had been out on $7,500 bail at the time of the most recent incident. Violence is and has been spreading across our nation.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | May 7, 1998
The Maryland National Guard wants to spread its anti-drug and -alcohol efforts in Carroll County, implementing a prevention program at the high schools and beginning an after-school program for at-risk middle school children, officials say.The effort, which could begin in September, is contingent on receiving a federal grant and the approval of Carroll County school officials, said Lt. Col. Robert L. Finn, who works for the National Guard's director of...
NEWS
November 21, 1995
ANY DECISION to terminate Education Alternatives Inc.'s stewardship of nine city schools should be based on the performance of EAI, not Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's need to cover a budget shortfall he helped create. There should be no disruption in the education of children in the Tesseract schools.School children didn't create the money problem. It resulted from the way the mayor andhis school superintendent handled school finances. Faced with the expense of settling a special education lawsuit and a big penalty for failing to meet a legislative mandate for management reforms, teachers still were granted a pay raise the city apparently couldn't afford.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2013
With a pressing need to build a new elementary school to relieve overcrowding near Owings Mills, the Baltimore County school board will soon have to decide whether it wants to locate the new building on land with an underground gas pipeline. The board voted Tuesday night to accept a donation of 6.8 acres from a developer, but not before a contentious discussion in which two board members questioned whether enough is known about the risk of putting children in a school next to a pipeline.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2013
A man was fatally shot Monday afternoon in the Ellwood Park neighborhood of East Baltimore, police said.  The victim's clothing, including his shoes and other items, could be seen on the sidewalk in the 500 block of N. Decker Ave. as school children, still wearing their backpacks, looked on.  Police did not immediately identify the victim, but said he was a 25-year-old who court records show lived in the block. The shooting was reported at about 2 p.m., police said. Anyone with information was asked to call homicide detectives at 410-396-2100.
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