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School Capacity

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NEWS
April 8, 1998
With a 3-3 vote, the Anne Arundel County Council killed a proposal Monday by County Executive John G. Gary that would have virtually halted the approval of new subdivisions in areas where schools are crowded. As an emergency bill, the proposed change to the county's ordinance on adequate public facilities required five votes to pass.Republicans Diane R. Evans, John J. Klocko III and Bert L. Rice, who sponsored the bill at Gary's request, voted for the measure, which would have required county planners to consider only the capacity at a proposed subdivision's neighboring school instead of the empty seats in an entire feeder system of schools.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2012
Uncertainty over the future of a 10.1-acre site for a new elementary school in Elkridge has forced the County Council to delay its decision on how many new homes can be built in Howard. Council members tabled a resolution Monday that they had previously approved setting limits for the number of new homes that developers can build between 2014 to 2016. Home builders must apply for allocations from the county to build new homes. Those allocations are limited when the schools are at or near capacity.
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NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | December 29, 1997
A Washington developer's 10-year battle to build 152 single-family homes in south Anne Arundel County was dealt another setback recently when county zoning officials refused to waive school capacity limits for the planned community.The county Department of Planning and Code Enforcement told Pointe Properties Inc. that the 100 students expected to enroll from the proposed 477-acre Baldwin's Choice subdivision on the Shady Side peninsula "would be detrimental to the quality of the curriculum and programs at these schools."
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2011
The fate of a $2.64 million deal for a new elementary school site in Elkridge remains unclear, with the property owners embroiled in a dispute over a lien that has delayed the project. If the Howard County school system cannot purchase a 10.1-acre site from Ducketts Ridge LLC, school officials will have to look elsewhere to open a 600-seat elementary school. The new school, which officials had hoped to open by August 2013, is needed to ease projected growth at Bellow Springs, Deep Run and Elkridge elementary schools in the northeastern part of the county.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,chris.guy@baltsun.com | August 31, 2008
County Councilman Ronald C. Dillon Jr. has always called Anne Arundel's method for counting school enrollment "this crazy formula." This week, the Pasadena Republican and County Executive John R. Leopold are sponsoring retooled legislation aimed at straightening a tangle of rules that some complain has stymied growth in areas designed to handle it, and has instead encouraged development in older communities in the northern part of the county. Dillon, who unsuccessfully sponsored a similar proposal in the spring, says changes are "long overdue" in how school populations are projected for the purpose of the county's adequate facilities law. "It's going to give us a much more accurate picture of what's the reality at our schools," he said.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2003
Though most say bigger is not better for school size, the Howard County Board of Education was left with little choice when it voted unanimously to raise the maximum capacity of new elementary schools from 596 seats to 788. "With the increase in population density and the county's zoning, the concept of small, intimate schools is not possible," said Sandra H. French, school board chairwoman. The decision has raised questions from community members who wonder what it will mean for their children's educations.
NEWS
By Ruma Kumar and Susan Gvozdas and Ruma Kumar and Susan Gvozdas,Sun Reporters | April 27, 2008
The Anne Arundel County Council is closer to passing a measure that would revamp the way school capacity is determined and could pave the way for more affordable housing development. The proposed legislation that could have drastically affected how schools are filled and housing developments proceed has steadily softened under heavy criticism from parents, school system officials and developers. Initial versions sought to raise the definition of "full" at elementary and secondary schools to 105 and 110 percent capacity, respectively.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2005
Harford County Councilman Dion F. Guthrie, who led the 13-month effort to change the county's adequate public facilities law to ease crowding in public schools, is fighting an uphill battle to keep the law on the books. Guthrie, the lone Democrat on the council, has introduced a bill that would remove the sunset provision on the legislation passed in October 2004. That provision halts the preliminary approval of new housing construction in any school district with a school exceeding capacity by 5 percent.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | September 15, 2003
Faced with growing pressure from builders and the threat of future lawsuits, Anne Arundel County officials will debate an issue today that has bedeviled jurisdictions across the region: how to balance school construction and new housing development. County Executive Janet S. Owens and Planning Officer Joseph W. Rutter Jr. want to come up with a more accurate way to calculate the number of open seats in local schools, while assuring developers that they would wait no more than six years to get the green light for a project, regardless of available seats.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | August 19, 2003
Anne Arundel County Council members delayed a final vote last night on legislation that could help to synchronize school construction and new residential development. The legislation - created by county Planning Officer Joseph W. Rutter Jr. in an effort to unite school and county officials in the process of planning for school capacity and residential growth - was discussed, but by late last night no vote had been taken. Some council members worry that the legislation, which would limit the wait by developers to six years, could open the floodgates to new subdivisions near crowded schools.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2011
The selection of two new school sites in Elkridge at Oxford Square and Ducketts Lane — chosen to alleviate overcrowding in northeast Howard County — could clear the way for developers to build new homes in the area. Nearly 30 new housing developments planned for Elkridge have been on hold because growth-control laws curb development around schools that are 15 percent or more over capacity. Three northeast middle schools and four elementary schools were predicted to soon exceed their limits, but with two new school sites chosen, the County Council can now approve the number of new home projects in the area.
EXPLORE
By EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | July 26, 2011
With capacity for fewer than 300 students, making it one of the smallest public schools in Harford County, Dublin has the odd distinction of being regarded as the only school in the county expected to exceed its capacity in the years to come. As a result, a residential building moratorium will be in place in the area served by the school, until the crowding issue is resolved. There are a number of reasons why, a few years after the county government and school system were poised to build two new elementary schools to deal with overcrowding, that crowding is no longer a problem.
EXPLORE
By EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | July 21, 2011
As was reported in The Aegis Wednesday, the new Red Pump Elementary School north of Bel Air is ready to open its doors to about 700 students in a little more than a month. The school's first principal, Blaine Hawley, is understandably excited about the opening of the $31 million school. "It was truly designed with the children in mind," she told our education reporter, Kayla Bawroski, during a tour of the building. Surely the surrounding community's excitement should match that of the school's principal.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,chris.guy@baltsun.com | August 31, 2008
County Councilman Ronald C. Dillon Jr. has always called Anne Arundel's method for counting school enrollment "this crazy formula." This week, the Pasadena Republican and County Executive John R. Leopold are sponsoring retooled legislation aimed at straightening a tangle of rules that some complain has stymied growth in areas designed to handle it, and has instead encouraged development in older communities in the northern part of the county. Dillon, who unsuccessfully sponsored a similar proposal in the spring, says changes are "long overdue" in how school populations are projected for the purpose of the county's adequate facilities law. "It's going to give us a much more accurate picture of what's the reality at our schools," he said.
NEWS
By Ruma Kumar and Susan Gvozdas and Ruma Kumar and Susan Gvozdas,Sun Reporters | April 27, 2008
The Anne Arundel County Council is closer to passing a measure that would revamp the way school capacity is determined and could pave the way for more affordable housing development. The proposed legislation that could have drastically affected how schools are filled and housing developments proceed has steadily softened under heavy criticism from parents, school system officials and developers. Initial versions sought to raise the definition of "full" at elementary and secondary schools to 105 and 110 percent capacity, respectively.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2005
Harford County Councilman Dion F. Guthrie, who led the 13-month effort to change the county's adequate public facilities law to ease crowding in public schools, is fighting an uphill battle to keep the law on the books. Guthrie, the lone Democrat on the council, has introduced a bill that would remove the sunset provision on the legislation passed in October 2004. That provision halts the preliminary approval of new housing construction in any school district with a school exceeding capacity by 5 percent.
NEWS
September 22, 1997
A COURT challenge to Carroll County's adequate public facilities criteria, in effect since last year, was inevitable. It should prompt a serious rethinking by the county's planning commission and Board of Commissioners to legally bolster, rather than abandon, the effort to peg new subdivision approvals to local school capacity.Circuit Court Judge Raymond E. Beck Sr. approved a 101-lot development in Westminster, persuaded that simply assigning the new subdivision in a different school zone (closer to those homes)
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | December 19, 2004
Anne Arundel County attorneys say the county's planning director, Joseph W. Rutter, has been improperly applying some development rules. Rutter disagrees and says he will not change his practices, which he called "the only defensible standard" under the law. Without the intervention of Rutter's boss, County Executive Janet S. Owens, it is unclear how this intragovernmental conflict will be resolved or what its implications could be. The mess started in...
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Jennifer McMenamin and Hanah Cho and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2004
Carroll County would need $150 million to $190 million to build at least six schools to accommodate students if the county adopts proposed school capacity standards recommended by a growth task force. That prospect was presented yesterday to the county commissioners by Steven C. Horn, the county planning director. An additional $12 million would be needed annually to cover debt service, and $16 million more would be required annually for operating costs, according to an analysis prepared by Ted Zaleski, the county budget director.
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