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NEWS
March 5, 2013
I recently had the privilege of speaking to an enthusiastic and hopeful crowd gathered in Annapolis to urge lawmakers to pass a bill allowing the state of Maryland to renovate or rebuild Baltimore City's school buildings over the next 10 years through an innovative financing arrangement ("Thousands rally for city schools construction plan," Feb. 26). We are not asking for additional funds but a simply a long-term commitment of funds already allocated by the state so that the city's school buildings can be brought on a par with those in the counties and with charter schools.
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NEWS
By Tom Wilcox, Wes Moore and Tom Bozzuto | February 4, 2013
Over the last 10 years leaders from the private, public and nonprofit sectors have begun to transform Baltimore's approach to its future. Traditional public subsidies have given way to strategic investments and tough decisions, using market-based techniques to reform our schools, rebuild our population, and make our neighborhoods safe, clean, green and vibrant. Now, the General Assembly must do its part to strengthen the city's future by passing legislation to reshape how the city makes improvements to its public school buildings.
NEWS
By Mark J. Rozell and Paul Goldman | February 6, 2012
A major reason many Maryland jurisdictions - especially Baltimore County and Baltimore City - confront a growing problem of aging, obsolete school buildings is an obscure bit of Internal Revenue Service bureaucracy called the "prior use rule. " It applies in a limited number of circumstances, one being projects to renovate certain old public school buildings. Since 1986, this rule has forced Baltimore and other localities into one of three unpalatable choices: grossly overpay for modernizing their oldest schools; build new, often much more expensive ones; or push the problem onto the back burner, guaranteeing any eventual solution will be even costlier.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 26, 1995
Around the country, the nation's schoolchildren are being jammed into crowded classrooms and school buildings that are falling apart. Often, they are trying to use new technology in old buildings not equipped to handle it.The result, according to a number of reports by educators and government agencies, is a need for record spending to renovate old schools and build new ones at a time when voters are !B increasingly leery of any public expenditures and particularly skeptical about the public schools.
EXPLORE
Editorial from The Aegis | December 18, 2012
It's easy to get lost in the back and forth about education policy decisions in Harford County, or anywhere else for that matter, and focus on problems like portable classrooms, security issues, teacher retirement plan funding and the like. A danger when this happens is the focus is lost on what's right with our public school system, and there's plenty that's right. Maryland has one of the highest-ranked public school systems in the country, and Harford County's public schools have been among the top tier in the state.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2011
The Board of Education of Baltimore County will reconsider a policy that limits craft fairs and other fundraisers held at school facilities, its members decided Saturday. The board will have its policy committee review the rule and decide if changes need to be made that would allow more people to use school buildings. The full board would then vote on any changes, said Earnest E. Hines, board president. "When the public has real concerns about something, we have to go back and examine it," Hines said shortly after the board made the decision at a retreat.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | November 3, 2011
Baltimore Freedom Academy students marched along East Fayette Street and in front of City Hall late Thursday afternoon, chanting "Save our schools!" and hoisting placards with such messages as "No Justice, No Peace, No Air, No Heat. " They led a procession of the school's teachers, faculty and parents into the adjacent War Memorial Building, where the group of about 40 joined approximately 200 other residents demanding that elected officials come up with funding to fix the city's deteriorating schools.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2012
Baltimore City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young on Thursday requested several city agencies prepare reports about a zoning bill introduced to the council this week that would allow a former Catholic school to be turned into a convalescent home for homeless people. Project PLASE (People Lacking Ample Shelter and Employment), a 30-year-old nonprofit headquartered in Charles North, has offered $1.4 million for the former St. Joseph's Monastery school buildings in the 3500 block of Old Frederick Road in Southwest Baltimore.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2012
A Baltimore delegate plans to introduce legislation to create an authority to oversee a new stream of school construction money that the city would get under a plan envisioned by schools CEO Andrés Alonso. Del. Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. said his bill would trigger a referendum in which city voters would be asked to create the Baltimore City Schools Construction Authority. If voters approved, the authority would administer a lump sum that the state would provide to the city each year to meet school construction needs.
NEWS
May 4, 2012
One only hopes that the Baltimore City School Board president is clearer with other facts than those involving the city school headquarters building, which he imagines is 184 years old ("As schools crumble, suites get renovated," April 27). In fact, the east and west wings of the headquarters opened in 1913. They were of modern construction and had huge, open cement floors which were then partitioned off for classrooms, shops labs, offices, etc. This is exactly the style used today.
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