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Editorial from The Aegis | December 18, 2012
It's easy to get lost in the back and forth about education policy decisions in Harford County, or anywhere else for that matter, and focus on problems like portable classrooms, security issues, teacher retirement plan funding and the like. A danger when this happens is the focus is lost on what's right with our public school system, and there's plenty that's right. Maryland has one of the highest-ranked public school systems in the country, and Harford County's public schools have been among the top tier in the state.
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NEWS
February 10, 2007
Baltimore: East side Inmate walks away from corrections site Authorities were searching last night for a 41-year-old inmate who walked away from the Metropolitan Transition Center in East Baltimore while working on a cleanup detail. Henry Bryant was picking up trash with other inmates yesterday afternoon outside the jail in the 900 block of Forrest Street. When an officer conducted a count at about 2:30 p.m., he realized that Bryant was missing, said George Gregory, a spokesman for the Maryland Division of Correction.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2012
Lawmakers across Maryland lauded the Baltimore school system's ambitious $2.4 billion blueprint to shed underused school buildings and upgrade the most dilapidated ones — calling the plan a critical first step in securing financial backing from the state. But they said Wednesday that the plan still will face hurdles — including some sentiment that the city should contribute more funding — when educators, politicians and advocates begin their lobbying for the 2013 General Assembly session.
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September 10, 2012
It was a typical Sunday worship service with a twist. The congregation at Ames United Methodist Church in Bel Air, the same lively and prayerful group that planned the hugely successful Yolanda Adams concert a couple weeks ago, was offerering hearty praise songs and worshipping together Sept. 2, in the church's Baltimore Pike sanctuary. Pastor Jay Blake, their annointed and ebullient leader, had just finished delivering a thought-provoking sermon. Challenging them that faith without works is dead, he implored the assembly to gather after the worship service for a brief road trip.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2011
At least 20 elementary school students and three teachers tested negative for exposure to mercury after a thermometer filled with the liquid broke in a science classroom Friday, according to Baltimore fire officials. City hazardous-materials teams and school police went to Guilford Elementary School on York Road after a teacher reported the thermometer broken and evacuated about 45 students from the classroom, according to city school officials. Fire officials said in a news release that students may have been handling a mercury-filled thermometer that broke.
NEWS
By The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2011
Baltimore City, Baltimore County and Harford County schools will be closed Tuesday as those systems postponed the start of the school year for a second day in a row because of power outages caused by Hurricane Irene. Anne Arundel, which opened schools last week, also are closed Tuesday. In Baltimore City, 30 school buildings that comprise 42 schools were without power late Monday afternoon, down from more than 60, according to Keith Scroggins, chief operating officer for city schools.
NEWS
June 7, 2007
Findings this spring by state inspectors that repairs and maintenance of Baltimore schools have been badly managed expose a level of disrespect for students and teachers that should not be tolerated. School system officials must be more aggressive in fixing the problems, and Mayor Sheila Dixon's call for an audit of school construction and renovation funds should be conducted as quickly as possible. In addition to having some of the oldest school buildings in the state, Baltimore has a history of not managing its facilities very well.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2005
City agencies will begin managing the day-to-day maintenance of Baltimore's public school buildings no later than next week under an agreement approved yesterday by the city's school board that also calls for the city to provide an infusion of $3 million. The action comes four days after the school board called a public meeting to consider the arrangement and then canceled the session without a word of public discussion - much to the consternation of Mayor Martin O'Malley, who thought a deal had been reached.
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AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 16, 2013
Harford County Public Schools announced last Friday that it will implement a four-day work week schedule for an eight-week period – from mid-June to early August – to save money and to have its facilities open into the early evening for parents who need to meet with school personnel. As a result, all but a handful of school buildings and other facilities will be closed on Fridays this summer, and the school system's 12-month employees will work four 10-hour days from the week of June 17 to 21 through the week of Aug. 5 to 9. "This new cost-saving strategy will save the school system approximately $120,000 by closing buildings for one day each week during an eight-week period throughout the summer," Superintendent Dr. Robert M. Tomback said in a news release announcing the change.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2013
The House of Delegates overwhelmingly approved a $1.1 billion plan Friday to rebuild Baltimore's deteriorated school buildings, sending the bill to the Senate. The vote was 107 to 30, with about a dozen Republicans joining all Democrats in supporting the bill. The legislation is a modified version of a plan conceived by city schools chief Andres Alonso and supported by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake. In its current form, the bill would allot $20 million a year in state lottery funds to match like amounts from both Baltimore and the city school system.
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