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NEWS
June 2, 2011
I recently read the article titled "Bill would all City Council to dedicate funds for school facilities" written by Erica Green ( June 1). I applaud the Baltimore City Council for taking a strong and affirmative action to address Baltimore City's efforts to improve its public school facilities. The initiative taken by the City Council to set up an account to pay for school construction and athletic facilities is something I've strongly advocated for in my many years of public service.
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NEWS
June 7, 2007
Findings this spring by state inspectors that repairs and maintenance of Baltimore schools have been badly managed expose a level of disrespect for students and teachers that should not be tolerated. School system officials must be more aggressive in fixing the problems, and Mayor Sheila Dixon's call for an audit of school construction and renovation funds should be conducted as quickly as possible. In addition to having some of the oldest school buildings in the state, Baltimore has a history of not managing its facilities very well.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2005
City agencies will begin managing the day-to-day maintenance of Baltimore's public school buildings no later than next week under an agreement approved yesterday by the city's school board that also calls for the city to provide an infusion of $3 million. The action comes four days after the school board called a public meeting to consider the arrangement and then canceled the session without a word of public discussion - much to the consternation of Mayor Martin O'Malley, who thought a deal had been reached.
NEWS
March 5, 2013
I recently had the privilege of speaking to an enthusiastic and hopeful crowd gathered in Annapolis to urge lawmakers to pass a bill allowing the state of Maryland to renovate or rebuild Baltimore City's school buildings over the next 10 years through an innovative financing arrangement ("Thousands rally for city schools construction plan," Feb. 26). We are not asking for additional funds but a simply a long-term commitment of funds already allocated by the state so that the city's school buildings can be brought on a par with those in the counties and with charter schools.
NEWS
By Tom Wilcox, Wes Moore and Tom Bozzuto | February 4, 2013
Over the last 10 years leaders from the private, public and nonprofit sectors have begun to transform Baltimore's approach to its future. Traditional public subsidies have given way to strategic investments and tough decisions, using market-based techniques to reform our schools, rebuild our population, and make our neighborhoods safe, clean, green and vibrant. Now, the General Assembly must do its part to strengthen the city's future by passing legislation to reshape how the city makes improvements to its public school buildings.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 26, 1995
Around the country, the nation's schoolchildren are being jammed into crowded classrooms and school buildings that are falling apart. Often, they are trying to use new technology in old buildings not equipped to handle it.The result, according to a number of reports by educators and government agencies, is a need for record spending to renovate old schools and build new ones at a time when voters are !B increasingly leery of any public expenditures and particularly skeptical about the public schools.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2012
State education leaders have offered legislators their recommendations for fixing the state law that requires local governments to fund their public schools at a minimum level. The state's superintendents, teachers union and local school boards released a plan Tuesday that would tighten a law meant to require that counties fund their schools at the minimum per pupil amount that they did the year before. The law was weakened last legislative session, they say, and must be fixed. They want to ensure that governments do not decrease the money they spend on schools.
NEWS
May 16, 2013
We share the editorial view that outgoing Baltimore City Schools CEO Andrés Alonso created a strong platform to sustain ongoing improvement in our schools ("School reform 2.0," May 12). But the editorial's call for more standardization around the system is off the mark. Instead, we urge the system to use this moment to engage parents, school leaders and others in a discussion about how we define a high-quality school. What does a good school look like and how do we measure it? In some ways, we know a good school when we see it: children are loved for who they are and challenged to be their very best.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2013
With bipartisan help from sympathetic lawmakers, Baltimore won a House committee's approval Tuesday for a $1 billion plan to replace and repair old schools. The Appropriations Committee voted 21-3 to send the plan to the House floor. Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller and House Speaker Michael E. Busch agreed on the legislation this week. Fixing the city's ailing schools is a top priority of Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, Baltimore schools chief Andrés Alonso and city legislators.
NEWS
February 9, 2007
Lack of heat closes four city school buildings This week's cold spell is taking a toll on Baltimore's old school buildings, four of which had to close early yesterday because of lack of heat. "We're fighting weather that's colder than usual and buildings that are very old," said Keith Scroggins, the school system's chief operating officer. "It's just creating havoc for us." The building housing Dr. Roland N. Patterson Sr. Academy and two charter schools closed at 10:30 a.m. after the boilers shut off and workers were unable to restart them.
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