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NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2012
Outraged education, community and political leaders have called for increased oversight of spending in the Baltimore City school system, amid revelations that about $500,000 was spent to upgrade offices at the district headquarters while city and state leaders fought for funding to fix dilapidated school buildings. Since January 2011, the school system has undertaken 11 renovation projects in eight departments, The Baltimore Sun reported this week. Half of the money went to renovation of a single department: The information technology office, which has spent $250,000 largely to transform an executive suite with new amenities such as interactive white boards.
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NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2005
City agencies will begin managing the day-to-day maintenance of Baltimore's public school buildings no later than next week under an agreement approved yesterday by the city's school board that also calls for the city to provide an infusion of $3 million. The action comes four days after the school board called a public meeting to consider the arrangement and then canceled the session without a word of public discussion - much to the consternation of Mayor Martin O'Malley, who thought a deal had been reached.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2013
Supporters of a $2.4 billion plan to rebuild Baltimore's crumbling schools made a show of support in Annapolis on Monday night as thousands of people staged a loud, festive rally outside the State House to urge passage of legislation to launch the program. Teachers, students, parents and others described deplorable conditions in city schools - ranging from disgusting bathrooms and broken windows to stifling classrooms and inadequate computer labs - as they called upon lawmakers to provide the resources to rebuild the state's oldest school buildings.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2010
The city school board approved Tuesday night a plan to lease one of the 13 school buildings closed by the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Baltimore earlier this year so that Mount Washington Elementary School can expand to serve middle-school grades. Under the plan, the school would move some grades into the former building of the Shrine of the Sacred Heart School beginning next fall. School officials hope to increase the school's capacity in elementary grades and provide relief at Roland Park Elementary-Middle School, which has absorbed about 80 percent of Mount Washington Elementary's rising sixth-graders since 2006.
NEWS
March 5, 2013
I recently had the privilege of speaking to an enthusiastic and hopeful crowd gathered in Annapolis to urge lawmakers to pass a bill allowing the state of Maryland to renovate or rebuild Baltimore City's school buildings over the next 10 years through an innovative financing arrangement ("Thousands rally for city schools construction plan," Feb. 26). We are not asking for additional funds but a simply a long-term commitment of funds already allocated by the state so that the city's school buildings can be brought on a par with those in the counties and with charter schools.
NEWS
June 2, 2010
Maryland's Bridge to Excellence Act of 2002, known as the Thornton law, revised the state's formula for funding school districts to direct more money to the state's poorest jurisdictions, where the need was greatest. Within a few years, the results were evident: In Baltimore City, test scores have been rising every year since the law was enacted, as have enrollment and graduation rates. At the same time, the city's dropout and absentee rates have fallen. The Thornton formula was devised to eliminate the disparities in instructional funding among the state's richest and poorest school districts, which in some cases amounted to thousands of dollars per pupil.
NEWS
By DAVID NITKIN and DAVID NITKIN,SUN REPORTER | December 23, 2005
With backing from the two Democratic candidates for governor, liberal advocacy groups yesterday urged Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. to forgo a property tax cut and dedicate the state budget surplus to school construction. Voters prefer spending surplus tax dollars to eliminate portable classrooms and improve aging schools, said Tom Hucker, executive director of Progressive Maryland, a coalition of religious, social service and community organizations. Hucker said a poll commissioned by the organization and released yesterday backed the conclusion, and he called Ehrlich "Governor Grinch" for not spending enough on school buildings during the past three years.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 26, 1995
Around the country, the nation's schoolchildren are being jammed into crowded classrooms and school buildings that are falling apart. Often, they are trying to use new technology in old buildings not equipped to handle it.The result, according to a number of reports by educators and government agencies, is a need for record spending to renovate old schools and build new ones at a time when voters are !B increasingly leery of any public expenditures and particularly skeptical about the public schools.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green | January 14, 2013
An executive suite in the city school system's headquarters that underwent $250,000 in lavish renovations last year will soon be empty. Jerome Oberlton, who repeatedly came under fire for his spending habits as the system's chief technology officer, has resigned his post, city school officials confirmed last week. Oberlton, who came to the district from the private sector in March 2011, has been named the new chief of staff for the Dallas Independent School District, the Dallas school district announced Friday.
EXPLORE
Editorial from The Aegis | December 18, 2012
It's easy to get lost in the back and forth about education policy decisions in Harford County, or anywhere else for that matter, and focus on problems like portable classrooms, security issues, teacher retirement plan funding and the like. A danger when this happens is the focus is lost on what's right with our public school system, and there's plenty that's right. Maryland has one of the highest-ranked public school systems in the country, and Harford County's public schools have been among the top tier in the state.
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