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NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2011
At least 20 elementary school students and three teachers tested negative for exposure to mercury after a thermometer filled with the liquid broke in a science classroom Friday, according to Baltimore fire officials. City hazardous-materials teams and school police went to Guilford Elementary School on York Road after a teacher reported the thermometer broken and evacuated about 45 students from the classroom, according to city school officials. Fire officials said in a news release that students may have been handling a mercury-filled thermometer that broke.
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NEWS
June 7, 2007
Findings this spring by state inspectors that repairs and maintenance of Baltimore schools have been badly managed expose a level of disrespect for students and teachers that should not be tolerated. School system officials must be more aggressive in fixing the problems, and Mayor Sheila Dixon's call for an audit of school construction and renovation funds should be conducted as quickly as possible. In addition to having some of the oldest school buildings in the state, Baltimore has a history of not managing its facilities very well.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2005
City agencies will begin managing the day-to-day maintenance of Baltimore's public school buildings no later than next week under an agreement approved yesterday by the city's school board that also calls for the city to provide an infusion of $3 million. The action comes four days after the school board called a public meeting to consider the arrangement and then canceled the session without a word of public discussion - much to the consternation of Mayor Martin O'Malley, who thought a deal had been reached.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2012
Terrell Carr and his mother, Niesha Carr, have loved his experience at William C. March Middle School. From the Arabic classes in which he's excelled to the quality of the instruction, both have nothing but good things to say about the school. And they are disappointed that it might close at the end of the year. "It's kind of sad because it's the best school I've ever been to," said Terrell, a 13-year-old seventh-grader who was attending the fifth annual Baltimore City Public Schools Middle and High School Choice Fair, which brought the system's 64 middle and high schools together Saturday to showcase their offerings for parents and students.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2010
The Rev. Allen Novotny, a Jesuit priest who held posts at Loyola Blakefield and Loyola University Maryland before becoming the president of Washington's Gonzaga College High School, was found dead at his order's District of Columbia residence Wednesday. He was 58. The Rev. Thomas Clifford, a fellow Jesuit and pastor of St. Aloysius Church in Washington, said Father Novotny had complained of flulike symptoms Monday and spent Tuesday in his room. An autopsy is being performed. Born in Baltimore and raised on Dean Street in Highlandtown, Father Novotny attended Sacred Heart of Jesus School and was a 1970 graduate of Loyola High School, now Loyola Blakefield.
NEWS
By DAVID NITKIN and DAVID NITKIN,SUN REPORTER | December 23, 2005
With backing from the two Democratic candidates for governor, liberal advocacy groups yesterday urged Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. to forgo a property tax cut and dedicate the state budget surplus to school construction. Voters prefer spending surplus tax dollars to eliminate portable classrooms and improve aging schools, said Tom Hucker, executive director of Progressive Maryland, a coalition of religious, social service and community organizations. Hucker said a poll commissioned by the organization and released yesterday backed the conclusion, and he called Ehrlich "Governor Grinch" for not spending enough on school buildings during the past three years.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 26, 1995
Around the country, the nation's schoolchildren are being jammed into crowded classrooms and school buildings that are falling apart. Often, they are trying to use new technology in old buildings not equipped to handle it.The result, according to a number of reports by educators and government agencies, is a need for record spending to renovate old schools and build new ones at a time when voters are !B increasingly leery of any public expenditures and particularly skeptical about the public schools.
NEWS
July 21, 2011
Baltimore City would get the best bang for the buck by allocating the majority of its slot machine revenue to upgrading school facilities. ( "Mayor to seek 9 % property tax cut" July 20) The slot machine law allows the city to use the funds only for property tax reduction and public school construction. Mayor Rawlings-Blake's plan to allocate 90% of Baltimore City's share of slot machine revenue to property tax reductions and only 10% to school construction is a terrible missed opportunity.
NEWS
February 9, 2007
Lack of heat closes four city school buildings This week's cold spell is taking a toll on Baltimore's old school buildings, four of which had to close early yesterday because of lack of heat. "We're fighting weather that's colder than usual and buildings that are very old," said Keith Scroggins, the school system's chief operating officer. "It's just creating havoc for us." The building housing Dr. Roland N. Patterson Sr. Academy and two charter schools closed at 10:30 a.m. after the boilers shut off and workers were unable to restart them.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2011
The Board of Education of Baltimore County will reconsider a policy that limits craft fairs and other fundraisers held at school facilities, its members decided Saturday. The board will have its policy committee review the rule and decide if changes need to be made that would allow more people to use school buildings. The full board would then vote on any changes, said Earnest E. Hines, board president. "When the public has real concerns about something, we have to go back and examine it," Hines said shortly after the board made the decision at a retreat.
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