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September 10, 2012
It was a typical Sunday worship service with a twist. The congregation at Ames United Methodist Church in Bel Air, the same lively and prayerful group that planned the hugely successful Yolanda Adams concert a couple weeks ago, was offerering hearty praise songs and worshipping together Sept. 2, in the church's Baltimore Pike sanctuary. Pastor Jay Blake, their annointed and ebullient leader, had just finished delivering a thought-provoking sermon. Challenging them that faith without works is dead, he implored the assembly to gather after the worship service for a brief road trip.
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NEWS
June 7, 2007
Findings this spring by state inspectors that repairs and maintenance of Baltimore schools have been badly managed expose a level of disrespect for students and teachers that should not be tolerated. School system officials must be more aggressive in fixing the problems, and Mayor Sheila Dixon's call for an audit of school construction and renovation funds should be conducted as quickly as possible. In addition to having some of the oldest school buildings in the state, Baltimore has a history of not managing its facilities very well.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2010
The Rev. Allen Novotny, a Jesuit priest who held posts at Loyola Blakefield and Loyola University Maryland before becoming the president of Washington's Gonzaga College High School, was found dead at his order's District of Columbia residence Wednesday. He was 58. The Rev. Thomas Clifford, a fellow Jesuit and pastor of St. Aloysius Church in Washington, said Father Novotny had complained of flulike symptoms Monday and spent Tuesday in his room. An autopsy is being performed. Born in Baltimore and raised on Dean Street in Highlandtown, Father Novotny attended Sacred Heart of Jesus School and was a 1970 graduate of Loyola High School, now Loyola Blakefield.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2005
City agencies will begin managing the day-to-day maintenance of Baltimore's public school buildings no later than next week under an agreement approved yesterday by the city's school board that also calls for the city to provide an infusion of $3 million. The action comes four days after the school board called a public meeting to consider the arrangement and then canceled the session without a word of public discussion - much to the consternation of Mayor Martin O'Malley, who thought a deal had been reached.
NEWS
March 5, 2013
I recently had the privilege of speaking to an enthusiastic and hopeful crowd gathered in Annapolis to urge lawmakers to pass a bill allowing the state of Maryland to renovate or rebuild Baltimore City's school buildings over the next 10 years through an innovative financing arrangement ("Thousands rally for city schools construction plan," Feb. 26). We are not asking for additional funds but a simply a long-term commitment of funds already allocated by the state so that the city's school buildings can be brought on a par with those in the counties and with charter schools.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 26, 1995
Around the country, the nation's schoolchildren are being jammed into crowded classrooms and school buildings that are falling apart. Often, they are trying to use new technology in old buildings not equipped to handle it.The result, according to a number of reports by educators and government agencies, is a need for record spending to renovate old schools and build new ones at a time when voters are !B increasingly leery of any public expenditures and particularly skeptical about the public schools.
NEWS
By Laurie Taylor-Mitchell and Lois Hybl | July 19, 2011
The recent reports on suspected cheating on standardized tests at some Baltimore City schools included the statement that school officials worry they might "have hit a wall in educating children. " Some of those walls have been in place for a long time in Maryland public schools - and they are dilapidated and moldy. Baltimore City and Baltimore County have the oldest school buildings in the state, and fewer than half of their schools have decent climate control, either in the hot months or the cold months.
NEWS
February 9, 2007
Lack of heat closes four city school buildings This week's cold spell is taking a toll on Baltimore's old school buildings, four of which had to close early yesterday because of lack of heat. "We're fighting weather that's colder than usual and buildings that are very old," said Keith Scroggins, the school system's chief operating officer. "It's just creating havoc for us." The building housing Dr. Roland N. Patterson Sr. Academy and two charter schools closed at 10:30 a.m. after the boilers shut off and workers were unable to restart them.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2011
The Board of Education of Baltimore County will reconsider a policy that limits craft fairs and other fundraisers held at school facilities, its members decided Saturday. The board will have its policy committee review the rule and decide if changes need to be made that would allow more people to use school buildings. The full board would then vote on any changes, said Earnest E. Hines, board president. "When the public has real concerns about something, we have to go back and examine it," Hines said shortly after the board made the decision at a retreat.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2012
A Baltimore delegate plans to introduce legislation to create an authority to oversee a new stream of school construction money that the city would get under a plan envisioned by schools CEO Andrés Alonso. Del. Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. said his bill would trigger a referendum in which city voters would be asked to create the Baltimore City Schools Construction Authority. If voters approved, the authority would administer a lump sum that the state would provide to the city each year to meet school construction needs.
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