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NEWS
June 7, 2007
Findings this spring by state inspectors that repairs and maintenance of Baltimore schools have been badly managed expose a level of disrespect for students and teachers that should not be tolerated. School system officials must be more aggressive in fixing the problems, and Mayor Sheila Dixon's call for an audit of school construction and renovation funds should be conducted as quickly as possible. In addition to having some of the oldest school buildings in the state, Baltimore has a history of not managing its facilities very well.
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AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 16, 2013
Harford County Public Schools announced last Friday that it will implement a four-day work week schedule for an eight-week period – from mid-June to early August – to save money and to have its facilities open into the early evening for parents who need to meet with school personnel. As a result, all but a handful of school buildings and other facilities will be closed on Fridays this summer, and the school system's 12-month employees will work four 10-hour days from the week of June 17 to 21 through the week of Aug. 5 to 9. "This new cost-saving strategy will save the school system approximately $120,000 by closing buildings for one day each week during an eight-week period throughout the summer," Superintendent Dr. Robert M. Tomback said in a news release announcing the change.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2005
City agencies will begin managing the day-to-day maintenance of Baltimore's public school buildings no later than next week under an agreement approved yesterday by the city's school board that also calls for the city to provide an infusion of $3 million. The action comes four days after the school board called a public meeting to consider the arrangement and then canceled the session without a word of public discussion - much to the consternation of Mayor Martin O'Malley, who thought a deal had been reached.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 26, 1995
Around the country, the nation's schoolchildren are being jammed into crowded classrooms and school buildings that are falling apart. Often, they are trying to use new technology in old buildings not equipped to handle it.The result, according to a number of reports by educators and government agencies, is a need for record spending to renovate old schools and build new ones at a time when voters are !B increasingly leery of any public expenditures and particularly skeptical about the public schools.
NEWS
January 30, 2014
Your recent editorial pooh-poohing expanding to other counties the innovative school construction model the legislature approved for Baltimore City missed the mark by a wide margin ("School construction apples and oranges," Jan. 14). I didn't vote for the Baltimore plan because the city is a special case (although, in some other important ways, it is). I voted for it because the plan made fiscal, educational and economic sense for taxpayers and for kids. The state school construction program, a progressive innovation in the 1970s when Governor Marvin Mandel and the legislature created it, needs updating.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2013
Baltimore administrators kicked off the coming school year Wednesday in an unconventional ceremony during which interim schools CEO Tisha Edwards told them that they would be encouraged to take risks, make mistakes and push the limits of what's possible. The annual event — which traditionally has been the superintendent's platform to deliver a "State of the Schools" address reviewing the previous year and previewing the next year's goals — drew more than 200 school leaders to the American Visionary Art Museum , where there was more dancing and laughter than data and lectures.
NEWS
May 16, 2013
We share the editorial view that outgoing Baltimore City Schools CEO Andrés Alonso created a strong platform to sustain ongoing improvement in our schools ("School reform 2.0," May 12). But the editorial's call for more standardization around the system is off the mark. Instead, we urge the system to use this moment to engage parents, school leaders and others in a discussion about how we define a high-quality school. What does a good school look like and how do we measure it? In some ways, we know a good school when we see it: children are loved for who they are and challenged to be their very best.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2012
State education leaders have offered legislators their recommendations for fixing the state law that requires local governments to fund their public schools at a minimum level. The state's superintendents, teachers union and local school boards released a plan Tuesday that would tighten a law meant to require that counties fund their schools at the minimum per pupil amount that they did the year before. The law was weakened last legislative session, they say, and must be fixed. They want to ensure that governments do not decrease the money they spend on schools.
NEWS
February 9, 2007
Lack of heat closes four city school buildings This week's cold spell is taking a toll on Baltimore's old school buildings, four of which had to close early yesterday because of lack of heat. "We're fighting weather that's colder than usual and buildings that are very old," said Keith Scroggins, the school system's chief operating officer. "It's just creating havoc for us." The building housing Dr. Roland N. Patterson Sr. Academy and two charter schools closed at 10:30 a.m. after the boilers shut off and workers were unable to restart them.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2011
The Board of Education of Baltimore County will reconsider a policy that limits craft fairs and other fundraisers held at school facilities, its members decided Saturday. The board will have its policy committee review the rule and decide if changes need to be made that would allow more people to use school buildings. The full board would then vote on any changes, said Earnest E. Hines, board president. "When the public has real concerns about something, we have to go back and examine it," Hines said shortly after the board made the decision at a retreat.
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