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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2012
A Baltimore delegate plans to introduce legislation to create an authority to oversee a new stream of school construction money that the city would get under a plan envisioned by schools CEO Andrés Alonso. Del. Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. said his bill would trigger a referendum in which city voters would be asked to create the Baltimore City Schools Construction Authority. If voters approved, the authority would administer a lump sum that the state would provide to the city each year to meet school construction needs.
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NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2012
Baltimore City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young on Thursday requested several city agencies prepare reports about a zoning bill introduced to the council this week that would allow a former Catholic school to be turned into a convalescent home for homeless people. Project PLASE (People Lacking Ample Shelter and Employment), a 30-year-old nonprofit headquartered in Charles North, has offered $1.4 million for the former St. Joseph's Monastery school buildings in the 3500 block of Old Frederick Road in Southwest Baltimore.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2004
CHICAGO -- Mayor Martin O'Malley said yesterday that he will emulate Chicago's most visible and successful school reform by spearheading a campaign over the next six months to upgrade Baltimore's public school buildings, which need more than $1 billion in improvements. O'Malley met here with Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley and his school leaders as part of an effort to educate himself on how to lead the deficit-racked Baltimore public schools toward financial accountability. Daley "has an appreciation for the aesthetics, the grounds, the windows, the campus that is the public school system," O'Malley said.
NEWS
June 2, 2011
I recently read the article titled "Bill would all City Council to dedicate funds for school facilities" written by Erica Green ( June 1). I applaud the Baltimore City Council for taking a strong and affirmative action to address Baltimore City's efforts to improve its public school facilities. The initiative taken by the City Council to set up an account to pay for school construction and athletic facilities is something I've strongly advocated for in my many years of public service.
NEWS
By SARA NEUFELD and SARA NEUFELD,SUN REPORTER | March 2, 2006
Young bodies sprawled out across the cold sidewalk on West Baltimore Street yesterday. There were at least 400 of them in all, Baltimore public school students, lying still as if they were dead. They hoped the officials across the street and safely inside at the Maryland State Department of Education would hear their cry: "No education, no life." It was Day 1 of a three-day student strike, protesting the impending closure of several Baltimore school buildings. Today, the students will be outside the city school system headquarters on North Avenue.
NEWS
May 4, 2012
One only hopes that the Baltimore City School Board president is clearer with other facts than those involving the city school headquarters building, which he imagines is 184 years old ("As schools crumble, suites get renovated," April 27). In fact, the east and west wings of the headquarters opened in 1913. They were of modern construction and had huge, open cement floors which were then partitioned off for classrooms, shops labs, offices, etc. This is exactly the style used today.
NEWS
By The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2011
Baltimore City, Baltimore County and Harford County schools will be closed Tuesday as those systems postponed the start of the school year for a second day in a row because of power outages caused by Hurricane Irene. Anne Arundel, which opened schools last week, also are closed Tuesday. In Baltimore City, 30 school buildings that comprise 42 schools were without power late Monday afternoon, down from more than 60, according to Keith Scroggins, chief operating officer for city schools.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2011
At least 20 elementary school students and three teachers tested negative for exposure to mercury after a thermometer filled with the liquid broke in a science classroom Friday, according to Baltimore fire officials. City hazardous-materials teams and school police went to Guilford Elementary School on York Road after a teacher reported the thermometer broken and evacuated about 45 students from the classroom, according to city school officials. Fire officials said in a news release that students may have been handling a mercury-filled thermometer that broke.
EXPLORE
September 10, 2012
It was a typical Sunday worship service with a twist. The congregation at Ames United Methodist Church in Bel Air, the same lively and prayerful group that planned the hugely successful Yolanda Adams concert a couple weeks ago, was offerering hearty praise songs and worshipping together Sept. 2, in the church's Baltimore Pike sanctuary. Pastor Jay Blake, their annointed and ebullient leader, had just finished delivering a thought-provoking sermon. Challenging them that faith without works is dead, he implored the assembly to gather after the worship service for a brief road trip.
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