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NEWS
July 3, 2012
Every Baltimore City school superintendent, mayor and state legislator of the last 50 years should be hanging their heads in shame over the atrocious condition of the city's public school buildings. The more than $2 billion of decay didn't just happen overnight. Where did all the money go? The cost to educate the city's schoolchildren continue to spiral out of control. Will the bottle tax be misused just like all the other well-intended taxes that were supposed to benefit the city's children?
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NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and new schools CEO Gregory Thornton will kick off a listening tour around the city on Monday, as part of a back-to-school campaign scheduled throughout the month that will include hearing out parent concerns and expectations for the upcoming school year. The effort will kick off in Cherry Hill, where Rawlings-Blake and Thornton will begin canvassing the neighborhood, knocking on doors and listening to residents. The first education forum will be held at Cherry Hill Elementary/Middle School on Thursday, when the mayor and new schools chief will talk about progress and challenges and their plans for the new school year.
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Editorial from The Aegis | November 29, 2012
At first glance, it may seem a bit petty for people in any community to complain that it's their turn for a replacement school, as happened earlier this week at a meeting of the advisory Abingdon Community Council. And for that sentiment to become the rallying cry for folks in Havre de Grace seeking a new high school. From a very real perspective, however, just about every community in Harford County can legitimately claim one of its public school buildings needs to be replaced or renovated top to bottom.
NEWS
July 12, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Maryland's federal delegation should be ashamed at themselves to block a plan by the Obama administration to shelter for immigrant children at the recently closed Metro West complex ( "Feds scrap plan for immigrant shelter at Metro West," June 11). It's simply not credible for U.S. Sen. Barbara Mikulski to base her objection on the "health and safety of the children. " She alleges that the recently vacated building, owned by the federal government, is not suitable for children because it has no infrastructure for residential use. Metro West has had a child care center with outdoor play space for 15 years.
NEWS
September 23, 2005
Baltimore's public school population is decreasing, while many of its school buildings - the oldest in the state - are deteriorating. State officials are pressing the city to close some schools, and that might be inevitable - but city school officials are right to take a systematic approach. They've hired a nationally known consulting firm to help draw up a comprehensive plan to determine which buildings should be shut down, which should be renovated and which neighborhoods warrant new schools.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 13, 1997
The Baltimore County school board voted at a meeting in Towson last night to allow facilities officials to negotiate the cost of a yearlong assessment of the county's 160 school buildings by Perks-Reutter Associates, a Philadelphia consultant.Perks-Reutter will identify and prioritize repair needs and produce cost estimates.The assessment, which is expected to cost about $1 million, is an attempt to comprehensively address chronic structural and environmental problems in the school system's aging buildings.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,Sun Staff Writer | September 10, 1995
Elementary schools such as 64-year-old Churchville Elementary top the list of Harford County school buildings needing upgrades and overhauls.The Level Road school has not been renovated or modernized since it was built in 1931.It has a "fair" health and safety rating, but the building's heating, electrical and plumbing systems are in poor condition, according to school system documents. The condition of the school's roof, replaced recently, is rated as good."If nothing else, our age would certainly justify a renovation," said Principal James H. Lewis III. "The boiler is a major problem."
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Staff Writer | April 25, 1993
Faced with requests to lower spending, Howard County school officials are looking at new ways to finance education. The latest: private financing of school buildings, where the county would lease facilities instead of buying land and building.The idea comes at a time when the education budget is being attacked again.On the operating side, school officials have to cut $5.3 million from their $208 million budget. This could mean that, among other things, high schools will open 15 minutes earlier next school year, saving $650,000.
NEWS
By SARA NEUFELD and SARA NEUFELD,SUN REPORTER | February 16, 2006
A day after Baltimore's school board received a proposal to close five school buildings by fall, school officials unveiled a $2.7 billion, 10-year plan that calls for building 26 schools and shifting thousands of children from middle schools to buildings housing prekindergarten though eighth grade. Under the plan, the system would shut down 11 of its 23 conventional middle schools and convert 45 schools -- 43 elementaries and two middle schools -- to combined elementary/middle schools.
NEWS
March 3, 1997
THE BALTIMORE COUNTY Council tonight has an opportunity to make sure the quest for money to fix deteriorating school buildings does not devolve into a contest over which communities can yell the loudest.The council is scheduled to vote on whether to use $1 million remaining from cuts it made to this year's budget for a comprehensive, expert survey of the condition of all 160 school buildings in the county.Outside consultants will assess each school's physical problems -- everything from electrical systems to leaky windows.
NEWS
January 30, 2014
Your recent editorial pooh-poohing expanding to other counties the innovative school construction model the legislature approved for Baltimore City missed the mark by a wide margin ("School construction apples and oranges," Jan. 14). I didn't vote for the Baltimore plan because the city is a special case (although, in some other important ways, it is). I voted for it because the plan made fiscal, educational and economic sense for taxpayers and for kids. The state school construction program, a progressive innovation in the 1970s when Governor Marvin Mandel and the legislature created it, needs updating.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2014
Without snowfall or ice on the roads, decisions by several Maryland school systems to cancel schools during a recent cold snap perplexed many. The polar vortex brought frigid arctic air into most of the country, and many schools in Baltimore and the region canceled or delayed classes — a measure aimed at keeping students warm and avoiding facility problems. Harford County Public Schools were among those closed Tuesday, when temperatures were in the single digits. The school system also had two-hour delays on Monday and Wednesday.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
Baltimore County plans to overhaul its elementary school buildings to add more than 1,700 seats in its central and southwestern neighborhoods, where overcrowding has pushed students and teachers into portable classrooms and hallways for their lessons. The proposal announced Wednesday by schools Superintendent Dallas Dance calls for reopening Loch Raven Elementary and moving Catonsville Elementary to the Bloomsbury Community Center as well as additions and renovations at other sites.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2013
Isaiah House won't be one of the students who walks through the doors of the newly renovated Pimlico Elementary/Middle School in a few years, but he jumped at the opportunity Wednesday to propose what he thought those who come after him should see and experience. "I think there should be a meditation room," the eighth-grader told his classmates as they pored over a blueprint of their current school. "So when the little kids are having a hard day, they can go in there and calm down.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2013
Baltimore administrators kicked off the coming school year Wednesday in an unconventional ceremony during which interim schools CEO Tisha Edwards told them that they would be encouraged to take risks, make mistakes and push the limits of what's possible. The annual event — which traditionally has been the superintendent's platform to deliver a "State of the Schools" address reviewing the previous year and previewing the next year's goals — drew more than 200 school leaders to the American Visionary Art Museum , where there was more dancing and laughter than data and lectures.
NEWS
By Davin Hong | July 18, 2013
The $1.2 billion approved by the Maryland General Assembly for city school construction is a historic opportunity for transformation in Baltimore. But if, after 10 years, the outcome is just new schools, we will have missed a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to affect not only schools but entire neighborhoods. As an architect, I believe in the value of good facilities and their ability to create healthy environments that promote learning. But better buildings alone are not enough to restore communities.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2003
State education officials reported results of a survey yesterday that indicated many of the public school buildings in Maryland are failing to meet local, state or national standards in areas ranging from air quality to building accessibility to student capacity. No sooner were the results made public than many school system leaders in the Baltimore region took issue with the conclusions reached in the survey, calling into question its methodology -- much of the information was self-reported -- and contending that the data were not only unreliable but unhelpful.
NEWS
By Stephen B. Awalt | June 19, 2013
Walking along Mount Royal Avenue from Maryland Institute College of Art to the University of Baltimore, what struck me most was the corridor's abject seediness: The buildings had a thick coating of decades-old industrial grime, there were strip bars across the street from the University of Baltimore, mega-sized roaches and a restroom mockup peeked out from the broad windows of the Odorite Building, prostitutes brazenly plied their trade at the...
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AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 16, 2013
Harford County Public Schools announced last Friday that it will implement a four-day work week schedule for an eight-week period – from mid-June to early August – to save money and to have its facilities open into the early evening for parents who need to meet with school personnel. As a result, all but a handful of school buildings and other facilities will be closed on Fridays this summer, and the school system's 12-month employees will work four 10-hour days from the week of June 17 to 21 through the week of Aug. 5 to 9. "This new cost-saving strategy will save the school system approximately $120,000 by closing buildings for one day each week during an eight-week period throughout the summer," Superintendent Dr. Robert M. Tomback said in a news release announcing the change.
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