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School Based Management

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By Linda MacMurray Gibbs | October 11, 1990
SCADS of articles have appeared in the press recently on proposed reforms in education, all pointing toward a new era of "school-based management." In this scenario, the principal is the central leader of the school, empowered to make decisions and take action without needing approval from a central office. The rationale is sound, based on the concept that decisions are most informed at the school level, where knowledge of the circumstances is greatest.
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NEWS
March 11, 2008
Baltimore schools CEO Andres Alonso has come up with an ambitious reorganization plan that would shift more authority and financial responsibility from the central office to principals and their staffs. School-based management is hardly a radical idea. It is already being practiced in the city's nearly two dozen charter schools. But school administrators must give principals all the support they need if the plan is to succeed. Principals would gain increased authority to run their schools, deciding on everything from supplies to test preparation, under the proposal to be presented to the Board of School Commissioners today.
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NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Sun Staff Writer | January 13, 1995
Baltimore's move to school-based management, a cornerstone of reform efforts, has been poorly planned, fragmented and hindered by a lack of training -- according to a new report that a key legislator labeled "devastating."Superintendent Walter G. Amprey said he agreed with the state-commissioned report, which assesses how well the city has shifted money, staff and authority from headquarters to schools. "We have many problems. . . . We are working them through."The schools chief, now in his fourth year at the helm, added that the restructuring is progressing and principals have more decision-making authority than ever.
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Sun Staff Writer | January 13, 1995
Baltimore's move to school-based management, a cornerstone of reform efforts, has been poorly planned, fragmented and hindered by a lack of training -- according to a new report that a key legislator labeled "devastating."Superintendent Walter G. Amprey said he agreed with the state-commissioned report, which assesses how well the city has shifted money, staff and authority from headquarters to schools. "We have many problems. . . . We are working them through."The schools chief, now in his fourth year at the helm, added that the restructuring is progressing and principals have more decision-making authority than ever.
NEWS
November 10, 1992
As a concept, school-based management has been around for more than a decade. Practiced in various school systems around the country, including Prince George's and Montgomery counties, its record has been relatively good so far as experiments in public education go.So it may come as a surprise to Howard County residents, who pride themselves on innovation in their classrooms, that school-based management has never been tried in the county.Better late than never, at least. County school officials have announced plans to convert six schools to the concept on a pilot basis for five years.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Staff Writer | October 28, 1992
Several Howard County schools will devise their own education plans next year as part of a new "school-based management" program approved by the Board of Education.The plan, approved last week, allows teachers, students, parents, and school administrators to take control of curriculum, finances, personnel and operation. All schools have been invited to apply, but only six will be chosen to participate.Advocates say the program will free schools from cumbersome bureaucracies by encouraging education plans that best suit their students' needs.
NEWS
December 20, 1990
Excerpts from the news conference at which the mayor announced he has asked the board not to renew the superintendent's contract:I asked Dr. Hunter to meet with the principals individually. He has not done that. Dr. Andrews [Dr. J. Edward Andrews, the deputy superintendent] has, and there have been improvements a result.I asked for a vocational education action plan from Dr. Hunter. I didn't get one. The members of the board had to push for it. That shouldn't be their role. The board should set broad policy.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Staff Writer | May 3, 1993
Next year will usher in a new program at Clemens Crossing Elementary School: daylong kindergarten.Some 20 kindergartners will get the chance to attend the program as part of a three-year, school-based management pilot project the Board of Education recently approved for the school. It is the first county school to offer a daylong kindergarten program."We've been wanting and wanting to try it, and now we have our opportunity," said Principal Jacqueline Lazarewicz, adding that her community had been clamoring for a full-day program for years.
NEWS
September 1, 1994
Howard County schools have opened with a challenging year ahead. About 36,000 students are projected to attend classes in the county -- an 1,800-student increase over last year and the largest jump in enrollment since 1973.Responding to that growth while accommodating new initiatives and tackling old problems will occupy a significant portion of the coming months for the school administration.For starters, the system opens the door on a new high school, the technologically superior River Hill in Clarksville.
NEWS
May 5, 1991
The "Baltimore and Beyond" report recommendation for "public charter schools" is not new -- it is the liberal version of the voucher plans advanced 20 years ago -- but it is in consonance with the latest thrust in education reform.Under the "Baltimore and Beyond" proposals, teachers, principals or civic organizations could form their own schools, independent of the local school bureaucracy. The schools would receive a per-pupil payment from state and local governments equal to the average spent in public schools.
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Sun Staff Writer | September 8, 1994
Think of them as branch offices scattered all over Baltimore, run largely by governing boards consisting of principals, parents, teachers and their aides, neighborhood residents, merchants, students, community activists.Their product: education.Their customers: students, parents, taxpayers.Think of Baltimore's 182 public schools this way, say school system leaders, to understand enterprise, as in "enterprise schools" -- the city's unprecedented move to transfer decision-making and staff from headquarters to all individual schools.
NEWS
September 1, 1994
Howard County schools have opened with a challenging year ahead. About 36,000 students are projected to attend classes in the county -- an 1,800-student increase over last year and the largest jump in enrollment since 1973.Responding to that growth while accommodating new initiatives and tackling old problems will occupy a significant portion of the coming months for the school administration.For starters, the system opens the door on a new high school, the technologically superior River Hill in Clarksville.
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Sun Staff Writer | March 18, 1994
It's a resume like nobody had ever seen from a candidate for City College principal.Law school professor, longtime attorney, coach, assistant high school principal, high school teacher, school board president, consultant, counselor, advocate for the dispossessed and friend and mentor to children.All of which made 51-year-old Joseph M. Wilson eminently qualified to take over as principal this week at America's third oldest public high school, say members of the committee that selected him.His background contrasts sharply with that of the more traditional principal candidate -- one who came up through the teacher and administrative ranks -- and that distinction goes a long way toward explaining his selection.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Staff Writer | November 23, 1993
Howard County School Superintendent Michael E. Hickey will give an update on a five-year-old plan aimed at preparing the schools for the next century, in a report at tonight's Board of Education meeting.The plan, entitled "Toward the Year 2000," contains about 150 recommendations to help keep the school system abreast of educational changes and reforms and to prepare students for the technologically evolving society.They include recommendations for improvements in such areas as community relations, educational programs, facilities, staff development and technology in schools.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Staff Writer | May 6, 1993
Four Baltimore elementary schools will each get $25,000 a year for three years in private funds to put into effect individualized plans to improve the education they provide their students.The awards by the Baltimore-based nonprofit Fund for Educational Excellence for its Transformation Project are the city's latest experiment in school-based management -- the centerpiece of efforts by the Schmoke administration to reform Baltimore's underfunded and underachieving school system.In September, the city began a five-year contract with a private company to manage nine so-called Tesseract schools, and two years ago the city initiated a "restructuring" program under which 14 schools are managed by committees of teachers, parents and administrators.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Staff Writer | May 5, 1993
Four Baltimore elementary schools will each get $25,000 a year for three years in private funds to put into effect individualized plans to improve the education they provide their students.The awards by the Baltimore-based nonprofit Fund for Educational Excellence for its Transformation Project are the city's latest experiment in school-based management -- the centerpiece of efforts by the Schmoke administration to reform Baltimore's underfunded and underachieving school system.Last September, the city began a five-year contract with a private company to manage nine so-called Tesseract schools, and two years ago the city initiated a "restructuring" program under which 14 schools are managed by committees of teachers, parents and administrators.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Staff Writer | May 3, 1993
Next year will usher in a new program at Clemens Crossing Elementary School: daylong kindergarten.Some 20 kindergartners will get the chance to attend the program as part of a three-year, school-based management pilot project the Board of Education recently approved for the school. It is the first county school to offer a daylong kindergarten program."We've been wanting and wanting to try it, and now we have our opportunity," said Principal Jacqueline Lazarewicz, adding that her community had been clamoring for a full-day program for years.
NEWS
November 10, 1992
As a concept, school-based management has been around for more than a decade. Practiced in various school systems around the country, including Prince George's and Montgomery counties, its record has been relatively good so far as experiments in public education go. So it may come as a surprise to Howard County residents, who pride themselves on innovation in their classrooms, that school-based management has never been tried in the county.Better late than never, at least. County school officials have announced plans to convert six schools to the concept on a pilot basis for five years.
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