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NEWS
March 28, 2014
At Wide Angle Youth Media, we couldn't agree more with Baltimore City Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke's statement that school attendance "is everybody's responsibility" ( "City councilwoman urges different approach to combating student absenteeism," March 2) Wide Angle is a nonprofit that provides Baltimore students with media education to tell their stories and become engaged in their communities. Regular school attendance is key along the route toward a brighter future. Our students are taking note of this and doing something about it. In partnership with the Baltimore Student Attendance Collaborative, and supported by the Open Society Institute-Baltimore, Wide Angle and its partners, such as AARP's Experience Corps and others, are working with principals, teachers and the community to reduce chronic absence by 25 percent by the end of the 2014-2015 school year.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 28, 2014
At Wide Angle Youth Media, we couldn't agree more with Baltimore City Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke's statement that school attendance "is everybody's responsibility" ( "City councilwoman urges different approach to combating student absenteeism," March 2) Wide Angle is a nonprofit that provides Baltimore students with media education to tell their stories and become engaged in their communities. Regular school attendance is key along the route toward a brighter future. Our students are taking note of this and doing something about it. In partnership with the Baltimore Student Attendance Collaborative, and supported by the Open Society Institute-Baltimore, Wide Angle and its partners, such as AARP's Experience Corps and others, are working with principals, teachers and the community to reduce chronic absence by 25 percent by the end of the 2014-2015 school year.
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NEWS
March 22, 2012
Op-ed writer John Clayton Young suggests that school should be optional for some students ("Why force a kid to go to school?" March 12). He claims a child shouldn't have to attend school if he or she doesn't want to and that forcing people to be there is a violation of their freedom. I couldn't disagree more. There are certainly other ways a child can get an education, acquire knowledge and learn to find his or her way in the world. But a general education opens a child's mind.
NEWS
By Eddie Brown and Brian DeWitt | March 25, 2014
Many good things are happening in Baltimore's public schools. We've moved away from zero-tolerance discipline policies, graduation rates are on the rise, and middle-graders are scoring higher on national assessments. But much more progress is needed, and Interim schools CEO Tisha Edwards recently highlighted a critically important challenge: improving school attendance. Ms. Edwards announced this month that she would begin to hold principals more accountable for high rates of chronic absenteeism in their schools.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2012
Maryland is poised to join a growing number of states that are requiring students to stay in school until their 18th birthday, a shift that President Barack Obama urged during his State of the Union address in January. A measure to raise the compulsory attendance age — state students now must attend until they turn 16 — has cleared both chambers in the Maryland General Assembly. It needs final approval by the Senate, which is expected as early as today. Gov. Martin O'Malley has said he will sign the legislation, which would fully take effect in 2017.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff writer | September 15, 1991
Carroll students showed up for class more often last year than any other year in the past decade, school officials reported Friday.The district's average daily attendance rate was 94.2 percent, up from 94.1 percent during the 1989-1990 school year, said Edwin L. Davis, director of pupil services/special programs."
NEWS
By Eddie Brown and Brian DeWitt | March 25, 2014
Many good things are happening in Baltimore's public schools. We've moved away from zero-tolerance discipline policies, graduation rates are on the rise, and middle-graders are scoring higher on national assessments. But much more progress is needed, and Interim schools CEO Tisha Edwards recently highlighted a critically important challenge: improving school attendance. Ms. Edwards announced this month that she would begin to hold principals more accountable for high rates of chronic absenteeism in their schools.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,nicole.fuller@baltsun.com | October 6, 2009
An Anne Arundel County schools redistricting committee is set to discuss at a public meeting tonight the school attendance boundaries at two Glen Burnie elementary schools. The redistricting committee will examine school attendance boundaries for Rippling Woods and Southgate Elementary schools with the aim of alleviating overcrowding at Rippling Woods and using new capacity being created at Southgate, the site of a continuing construction project, according to school officials. Both schools are located in the Old Mill High School feeder system.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1996
A community panel has recommended four adjustments to elementary school attendance boundaries in West County as part of its plan for dividing the student population between the existing MacArthur Middle and Meade Area Middle, which is to open in 1997.The committee recommended:Send children from the Seven Oaks and Spring Meadows communities, who attend Odenton Elementary, to Meade Heights Elementary. School officials say that would lead to crowding at Meade Heights between 2002 and 2006.Shift children in the Harwood and Greenbriar neighborhoods from Jessup Elementary to Harman Elementary.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | April 15, 1997
Anne Arundel County school board members are likely to continue tinkering tomorrow with their plan to redraw school attendance boundaries.Some board members are uneasy about parts of the proposal, especially a recent amendment to pull four communities south of Annapolis out of the Mills-Parole Elementary School attendance area and place them in Edgewater Elementary.Parents in four predominantly white neighborhoods have been clamoring for more than a decade to send their children to the mostly white Edgewater school instead of to the predominantly black Annapolis school, saying they are part of Edgewater.
NEWS
March 22, 2014
How do you change a culture of chronic absenteeism in Baltimore City? It's like eating an elephant; you have to take one bite at a time ("City principals face discipline for student absenteeism," March 16). After coordinating an attendance initiative in Baltimore City and working to help urban school districts improve school attendance, there are a few things I know for sure. It takes collaboration to educate parents, students and school staff on attendance policy and procedure. It takes resources to remove barriers to attendance and it takes consistency to hold all parties accountable in making sure children attend school on a daily basis.
NEWS
March 17, 2014
Baltimore City principals are criticizing interim schools CEO Tisha Edwards' decision to hold them accountable for high rates of chronic absenteeism among their students. The principals say it's the parents' fault if children don't come to class and that schools can't be expected to fix all the problems in students' homes that keep them from showing up. But while it's certainly true that some parents are lax about getting their kids to school and need to shape up, that doesn't mean principals are justified in simply throwing up their hands and insisting there's nothing more they can do. The manner and timing of Ms. Edwards' action left much to be desired - she put a third of city principals on performance improvement plans without much warning and with only three months left in the school year - but the policy is spot-on.
NEWS
October 7, 2013
I appreciated your recent editorial, "The value of showing up" (Sept. 29) because it shed some much needed light on the issue of tracking chronic absenteeism. Left unchecked, chronic absenteeism in the pre-K and kindergarten years will snowball into poor academic performance and a higher risk for dropping out of high school. The good news is that with effective interventions, research has shown that patterns of poor attendance can be reversed. The most effective strategies for reducing chronic absenteeism require collaboration between the schools, their nonprofit partners, and the parents.
NEWS
September 29, 2013
A few years ago, Franklin Square Elementary/Middle School Principal Terry Patton was trying to figure out how to get more of her students to attend school regularly when she hit on a novel idea: Get a washing machine and dryer. From talking to her students and their parents, she had learned that many children didn't come to school every day because they were ashamed of wearing dirty uniforms, and their families don't have laundry facilities at home. So Ms. Patton got a non-profit group to donate a washer-dryer to the school and told her students they could use it. Soon, children who had been skipping school two or three days a month started showing up regularly for class.
NEWS
May 17, 2013
Sometimes, the same old solutions are inadequate for stubborn problems. New directions must be found. So it is with overcrowding in the Baltimore County Public School system. The county has too few bricks-and-mortar schools for the number of students attending. The problem is chronic and unlikely to improve - projections show county public school attendance rising in the years to come. Exacerbating the problem is the troubled economy, which is forcing parents to switch from private to public schools to save tuition costs.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2012
In the hours after 17-year-old Daniel Borowy was shot in the cafeteria of Perry Hall High School on the first day of school in August, allegedly by a 15-year-old schoolmate, doctors at the Maryland Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore had to use more than 10 units of donated blood to replace what he had lost. Borowy, whose shooting prompted a broad review of safety procedures in Baltimore County schools, needed still more blood through three surgeries to repair his wounds, particularly the hole in his torso.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Staff Writer | October 22, 1992
It's difficult to turn down an invitation to Juvenile Court to talk about your child's school attendance -- especially when a Baltimore police officer delivers it to your home.That strategy is at the heart of a new anti-truancy program launched this month by the Baltimore school system in cooperation with the courts, state and city agencies and local law enforcement.Plagued by up to 20,000 chronic truants, city officials have begun an aggressive campaign aimed at turning around some 400 youngsters with serious attendance problems.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Staff Writer | June 17, 1993
Sparked by a 16.4 percent student dropout rate last year -- more than three times the 5.2 percent rate statewide -- the Baltimore school system is revamping its vocational education curriculum and making other reforms that might retain students, the city schools superintendent, Walter G. Amprey, said yesterday.Dr. Amprey said he shook up the school system's vocational education office earlier this week because it had failed to offer alternative programs to students, many of whom end up dropping out of school because they are bored with academics.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2012
Maryland is poised to join a growing number of states that are requiring students to stay in school until their 18th birthday, a shift that President Barack Obama urged during his State of the Union address in January. A measure to raise the compulsory attendance age — state students now must attend until they turn 16 — has cleared both chambers in the Maryland General Assembly. It needs final approval by the Senate, which is expected as early as today. Gov. Martin O'Malley has said he will sign the legislation, which would fully take effect in 2017.
NEWS
March 22, 2012
Op-ed writer John Clayton Young suggests that school should be optional for some students ("Why force a kid to go to school?" March 12). He claims a child shouldn't have to attend school if he or she doesn't want to and that forcing people to be there is a violation of their freedom. I couldn't disagree more. There are certainly other ways a child can get an education, acquire knowledge and learn to find his or her way in the world. But a general education opens a child's mind.
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