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By M. WILLIAM SALGANIK | May 28, 1994
In budgeting, everything is a trade-off. Hire more police or buy new fire equipment. Hold down tuition at public colleges or give professors a raise. Build a space station or enlarge Head Start. Maryland may be seeing the beginnings of an unusual budget trade-off: building schools over running schools.The state pays about 40 percent of the cost of operating public elementary and secondary schools, with local governments paying most of the rest. For years, there has been concern over the disparity between rich and poor school districts.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2013
Maryland's top court upheld the convictions this week of Karl Marshall Walker Jr. a former Columbia elementary school worker whose love letters to an 8-year-old girl at the school led to precedent-setting convictions on charges of sexual abuse of a minor and attempted sexual abuse of a minor. Walker acknowledged that his behavior was inappropriate, but maintained that he neither molested nor sexually exploited the girl, nor had he tried to, and his lawyers said he was the first person in the state to be convicted of sexual abuse without evidence of physical sexual contact.
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NEWS
October 31, 1993
A gubernatorial advisory commission has come up with some sensible suggestions for enhancing the state's school-aid program that not only should help Maryland's poorer jurisdictions but could put considerable pressure on under-performing schools to do a better job of educating students.That the commission wants to add $291 million to state school aid over five years is not novel. Such incremental increases have been routine during the past quarter-century. What's exciting is the way this money would be distributed.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2012
Students across the country are headed back to college, and millions of them will get financial aid disbursed on a debit card. The cards are convenient and save money for the schools. But these debit cards can be expensive for students, who could see their financial aid eaten up by fees. This month, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. announced it had ordered the nation's largest player in campus debit cards — Higher One — to return about $11 million to roughly 60,000 students related to fees the company charged for insufficient funds.
NEWS
December 23, 1993
You can't blame Sen. John A. Cade, R-Anne Arundel, for the frustration he displayed after a gubernatorial commission scaled down its plans for overhauling and enlarging Maryland's school-aid program. "The commission owes it to itself, to the children and to the governor to provide the best recommendations we can make," the Senate minority leader and panel member said. Reporting out a slimmer package of suggestions is intellectually dishonest.But this more modest approach does have the advantage of being politically realistic.
NEWS
May 1, 1993
Is it time for another school-aid fix? Gov. William Donald Schaefer thinks so. He's naming another commission to consider changes in state education funding. Something must be done to close the growing disparity gap between the amount wealthy and poor jurisdictions spend on each student.Yet adding more money to the education pot will not, by itself, solve the problem. Localities have to be made more accountable for how they spend education aid. Simply using extra cash to raise teacher salaries, a tactic used by many jurisdictions when state aid was increased previously, hasn't led to any measurable improvement in the classroom.
NEWS
By BARRY RASCOVAR | January 26, 1997
IT IS THE MOST divisive and rancorous issue of the 1997 General Assembly session, a proposal that could leave deep and lasting scars in the two chambers: School aid for Baltimore.Anyone who cares about delivering a high-quality education to children should be whole-heartedly in favor of this proposal. Anyone who understands the critical importance of Baltimore to the economic future of Maryland should be for it.A court-brokered agreement calls for an overhaul of city school management, tough accountability and $256 million over five years in new state money to end the city's pathetic inability to teach its own students how to read, write and compute adequately.
NEWS
By Sara Engram | April 13, 1997
THE BALTIMORE school-aid package passed by the legislature and signed by the governor last week is a huge victory for school reform. But hard work lies ahead.First, of course, will be the nuts and bolts of implementing the new management structure -- appointing a new board, finding the right leaders for the system and then actually putting in place the administrative changes that should lead to better student achievement. This needs to happen as quickly as possible, given the inevitable confusion and sagging morale caused by the uncertainties of the past year.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 26, 1996
The Maryland Legislative Black Caucus is planning a big rally in Annapolis on Feb. 3 to press the case for an increase in state school aid to Baltimore and the state's other poorer jurisdictions.Caucus members, supported by clergy and community leaders, said yesterday that they hope to attract at least 10,000 registered voters to the event, which they have dubbed "Education First Mobilization Day.""It will be the biggest mobilization since the civil rights days," said state Sen. Larry Young, a West Baltimore Democrat and chairman of the caucus.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Staff Writer | March 18, 1993
State delegates took unprecedented action against Baltimore City last night by voting to withhold almost $5 million from the city until it takes steps to improve its public schools.In so doing, most suburban and rural lawmakers made it clear that they were tired of pouring millions of tax dollars from their counties into troubled city schools without seeing results. The vote was 85 to 43."Every year we're asked to put an enormous amount of money into the Baltimore City school system. I have constituents who are saying, 'When are we going to stop pumping money into a system that won't try to improve itself?
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2010
A 63-year-old former classroom aide was sentenced Monday to 18 months in jail and is expected to receive a similar sentence later this week for molesting two girls in his Crofton neighborhood — a sentence crafted to keep John Riva, who has no previous criminal record, out of state prison. "I am aware of the implication of sending a 63-year-old man to the Division of Correction," Anne Arundel County Circuit Judge Paul A. Hackner told Riva. He said that although he wanted to punish Riva, "it is not my intention to sentence you to death.
NEWS
By Kellie Woodhouse, Columbia Flier | September 24, 2010
A 38-year-old Columbia educator was found guilty Friday of sexually abusing a third-grader by writing her dozens of explicit love letters, setting a new precedent in Maryland for child predators being convicted of a sex crime without ever touching a child in a sexual manner. Howard County Circuit Court Judge Diane Leasure ruled that Karl Marshall Walker Jr., who worked as a paraeducator at Bryant Woods Elementary School for three years, sexually exploited an 8-year-old girl by giving her notes that spoke of his passion for her, his desire to kiss her and his request that she keep their correspondence secret.
NEWS
May 27, 2010
Maryland's State Department of Education is set to submit its application next week for the second round of the federal Race to the Top competition, which could bring $250 million in new education funding to the state. But the effort is being threatened by a self-defeating display of pique on the part of Montgomery County schools officials and teachers unions from several of Maryland's large jurisdictions, who are refusing to sign on to the application because they object to its provisions for tying teacher evaluations to student test scores.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | August 9, 2009
Col. Louis Beck, a retired career Army intelligence officer who served in three wars, died of liver failure Aug. 2 at the Veteran Administration's Extended Care and Rehabilitation Center in Northeast Baltimore. He was 90 and had lived in Northwest Baltimore. Colonel Beck, the son of parents from Lithuania and Belarus, was born and raised in Hartford, Conn., where he attended Hartford High School. In 1943, he was inducted into the Army, where he earned his General Educational Development diploma.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | April 3, 2009
The Maryland Senate approved its version of the state's annual budget Thursday, drawing vocal opposition from education advocates who warn that lawmakers are shortchanging schools. Amid plunging state tax revenues, the Senate voted 40-7 for the $13.8 billion spending plan that incorporates hundreds of millions of dollars from a federal economic stimulus package while trimming local government aid and various programs. The budget is now in the hands of a cross-chamber conference committee with the House of Delegates, which made fewer spending cuts than the Senate.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,gadi.dechter@baltsun.com | January 24, 2009
Gov. Martin O'Malley defended his plan yesterday to decrease public school budgets by about $69 million next fiscal year as officials from hard-hit areas vowed to fight the proposed cuts. O'Malley, a Democrat, said that Baltimore schools chief Andres Alonso's contention that the governor was destroying years of education gains was "patently false." O'Malley urged the popular and outspoken educator to understand that the financial pain caused by the national economic meltdown must be widely distributed.
NEWS
By Eugene W. Goll | August 28, 1991
IN LIGHT of Baltimore city schools' perpetual money problems, state statistics tell a sad story. In the decade after Baltimore unsuccessfully sued the state for more education aid but was promised great improvement, the city has done proportionately less well than all other districts in Maryland.Maryland has indeed failed to uphold its end of the bargain. State Education Department tables show that during the decade between 1980-1981 and 1989-1990, city schools received an increase in state aid for operating expenses of 93.6 percent.
NEWS
By Jean Thompson and Jean Thompson,SUN STAFF | June 21, 1996
Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke dismissed as too low yesterday the state's offer this week of $140 million in new school aid and called the state's insistence on improvements in managing the school system "insulting and paternalistic."In a sharply worded letter to Gov. Parris N. Glendening, Schmoke revealed how far apart the city and state remain in their year-old dispute over school reform, management and finances.On matters of school leadership and improvement, there is no agreement. On the money issue, Schmoke made it clear that he views the governor's offer as insufficient.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,liz.bowie@baltsun.com | January 8, 2009
Five years after Maryland increased spending by $2 billion to provide greater academic equity, students have made remarkable gains in reading and math, according to a report given to the Maryland General Assembly yesterday by an outside consultant. For every additional $1,000 spent per student, there was a significant increase in pass rates in both subjects. The improvement was twice as great for middle school students as for those in elementary grades. The report by MGT of America also confirms what most educators have intuitively believed for decades: Money invested in teachers appears to pay off. About 80 percent of additional local and state funding has been spent on the teaching staff - raising salaries, hiring more to reduce class sizes and requiring a highly qualified teacher in every classroom.
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