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NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | September 27, 1990
PHILADELPHIA -- The Scholastic Aptitude Test, the college-entrance exam millions of teen-agers take each year, may be significantly changed for the first time in 50 years.Trustees of the College Board, which administers the national test, were to meet in New York today and tomorrow to consider restructuring the exam, in a move to make it harder to coach students for the test and to make the exam more attuned to schoolwork.Although the specific proposals are secret, some board members disclosed that they include introducing more essay-type questions, allowing students to use calculators and adding mathematics problems without multiple-choice answers.
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FEATURES
By ALICE STEINBACH | March 16, 1994
In just a few days, more than 200,000 high-school students will learn a lesson they don't teach in school.Which is: Reality bites.Or put another way: It's time once again for the dreaded Scholastic Aptitude Test to ambush the hopes of college-bound students across the land.With No. 2 pencils at the ready and calculators in hand, they will march into the fearsome Valley of SAT-Land, hoping to reach successfully the high ground beyond, the place called: College.Taking the SAT is, traditionally, an ordeal filled with fear and loathing.
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NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Staff Writer | August 30, 1992
Scholastic Aptitude Test scores in Howard County changed little from last year, school officials said. The average scores on the verbal portion of the test dropped to 455 from 458 the year before. Math scores rose to 521 from 517.This year's combined score rose one point to 976. Last year, Howard County school officials reported a 12-point jump in combined scores for county seniors."The fact that we held is not just an aberration," spokeswoman Patti Caplan said. "Our students are holding that score."
NEWS
August 22, 1993
First day for teachers: Aug. 31Last day of school: June 17Winter vacation: Dec. 24 through Jan. 2Spring break: March 31 through April 5Days report cards are distributed: Nov. 5; Jan. 27; April 15; June 17Lunch prices:Elementary: $1.15Middle and high school: $1.30Adult: $2.25Milk: 30 centsBreakfast: 75 centsImmunizations (shots) required: Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, rubella, measles, mumps and Haemophilus influenza Type Equipment: Required supplies vary by school, grade and teacher.
NEWS
By Anthony DePalma and Anthony DePalma,New York Times News Service | January 22, 1991
Already under pressure from parents, peers and a society that often sees test scores as measures of success, increasing numbers of students as young as age 12 are taking the difficult, three-hour college entrance examination before entering high school.Last year, 105,700 seventh- and eighth-graders took the Scholastic Aptitude Test, a multiple-choice examination intended for high school juniors and seniors.The number of young test-takers has been growing for the last 20 years; that age group now makes up 6 percent of the 1.7 million students who take the exam each year.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 1, 1990
BOSTON -- The Scholastic Aptitude Test will undergo a major overhaul by 1994, with more emphasis on reading and less on multiple-choice questions, College Board officials announced FTC yesterday.However, a controversial proposal to require a written essay as a standard part of the college admission examination was dropped.Instead, bowing to California educators and Asian-Americans worried about the effect on immigrants, a written essay will replace the multiple-choice English composition achievement test, which is merely supplemental to the regular SAT and is required by far fewer colleges.
NEWS
August 22, 1993
First day for teachers: Aug. 31Last day of school: June 17Winter vacation: Dec. 24 through Jan. 2Spring break: March 31 through April 5Days report cards are distributed: Nov. 5; Jan. 27; April 15; June 17Lunch prices:Elementary: $1.15Middle and high school: $1.30Adult: $2.25Milk: 30 centsBreakfast: 75 centsImmunizations (shots) required: Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, rubella, measles, mumps and Haemophilus influenza Type Equipment: Required supplies vary by school, grade and teacher.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 26, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Although studies show girls get better grades in high school and college than boys, only about 35 percent of National Merit Scholarship winners are girls, according to a new report that raises questions about the fairness of the nation's most prestigious scholarship program.According to FairTest, an organization striving to keep bias out standardized tests, more than 60 percent of semifinalists in the 1993 competition are boys. In none of the 50 states were more girls than boys selected.
NEWS
By John Harris III | February 26, 1991
The way Annapolis baseball coach Larry Brogden sees it, today's youth have too many other things to do with their time then spend it participating in sports."
FEATURES
By ALICE STEINBACH | March 16, 1994
In just a few days, more than 200,000 high-school students will learn a lesson they don't teach in school.Which is: Reality bites.Or put another way: It's time once again for the dreaded Scholastic Aptitude Test to ambush the hopes of college-bound students across the land.With No. 2 pencils at the ready and calculators in hand, they will march into the fearsome Valley of SAT-Land, hoping to reach successfully the high ground beyond, the place called: College.Taking the SAT is, traditionally, an ordeal filled with fear and loathing.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 26, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Although studies show girls get better grades in high school and college than boys, only about 35 percent of National Merit Scholarship winners are girls, according to a new report that raises questions about the fairness of the nation's most prestigious scholarship program.According to FairTest, an organization striving to keep bias out standardized tests, more than 60 percent of semifinalists in the 1993 competition are boys. In none of the 50 states were more girls than boys selected.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Staff Writer | August 30, 1992
Scholastic Aptitude Test scores in Howard County changed little from last year, school officials said. The average scores on the verbal portion of the test dropped to 455 from 458 the year before. Math scores rose to 521 from 517.This year's combined score rose one point to 976. Last year, Howard County school officials reported a 12-point jump in combined scores for county seniors."The fact that we held is not just an aberration," spokeswoman Patti Caplan said. "Our students are holding that score."
BUSINESS
By Carol Kleiman and Carol Kleiman,Chicago Tribune | August 3, 1992
Three years ago, a shudder went through the hearts of female students and their tuition-paying parents when research by a women's advocacy group concluded that the Educational Testing Service's Scholastic Aptitude Test, or SAT, is biased against girls and women.Each year, more than 1.7 million students who want to go to college, many of them seeking scholarships, plunk down $17 to take the test. Fifty-two percent are female.A riveting study of SAT scores for verbal and mathematical skills in 1989 by Phyllis F. Rosser, director of the Equality and Testing Project in Holmdel, N.J., showed that the gap between SAT scores of females and males was 57 points, with girls averaging 878 points out of a possible 1,600 and boys averaging 935."
NEWS
By Freeman A. Hrabowski III | March 20, 1991
JOE has maintained a perfect academic average through his 12 years of schooling. So has Tonya. Both Charles and Tyrone are presidents of the National Honor Society and captains of the football team at their respective schools. Bill earned a 780 (out of a possible 800) on the math portion of the Scholastic Aptitude Test.America's high schools are proud to produce such high achievers and to recommend them to leading colleges and universities. And thoseinstitutions vie keenly with one another to recruit them.
NEWS
By John Harris III | February 26, 1991
The way Annapolis baseball coach Larry Brogden sees it, today's youth have too many other things to do with their time then spend it participating in sports."
NEWS
By Anthony DePalma and Anthony DePalma,New York Times News Service | January 22, 1991
Already under pressure from parents, peers and a society that often sees test scores as measures of success, increasing numbers of students as young as age 12 are taking the difficult, three-hour college entrance examination before entering high school.Last year, 105,700 seventh- and eighth-graders took the Scholastic Aptitude Test, a multiple-choice examination intended for high school juniors and seniors.The number of young test-takers has been growing for the last 20 years; that age group now makes up 6 percent of the 1.7 million students who take the exam each year.
NEWS
By Freeman A. Hrabowski III | March 20, 1991
JOE has maintained a perfect academic average through his 12 years of schooling. So has Tonya. Both Charles and Tyrone are presidents of the National Honor Society and captains of the football team at their respective schools. Bill earned a 780 (out of a possible 800) on the math portion of the Scholastic Aptitude Test.America's high schools are proud to produce such high achievers and to recommend them to leading colleges and universities. And thoseinstitutions vie keenly with one another to recruit them.
BUSINESS
By Carol Kleiman and Carol Kleiman,Chicago Tribune | August 3, 1992
Three years ago, a shudder went through the hearts of female students and their tuition-paying parents when research by a women's advocacy group concluded that the Educational Testing Service's Scholastic Aptitude Test, or SAT, is biased against girls and women.Each year, more than 1.7 million students who want to go to college, many of them seeking scholarships, plunk down $17 to take the test. Fifty-two percent are female.A riveting study of SAT scores for verbal and mathematical skills in 1989 by Phyllis F. Rosser, director of the Equality and Testing Project in Holmdel, N.J., showed that the gap between SAT scores of females and males was 57 points, with girls averaging 878 points out of a possible 1,600 and boys averaging 935."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 1, 1990
BOSTON -- The Scholastic Aptitude Test will undergo a major overhaul by 1994, with more emphasis on reading and less on multiple-choice questions, College Board officials announced FTC yesterday.However, a controversial proposal to require a written essay as a standard part of the college admission examination was dropped.Instead, bowing to California educators and Asian-Americans worried about the effect on immigrants, a written essay will replace the multiple-choice English composition achievement test, which is merely supplemental to the regular SAT and is required by far fewer colleges.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | September 27, 1990
PHILADELPHIA -- The Scholastic Aptitude Test, the college-entrance exam millions of teen-agers take each year, may be significantly changed for the first time in 50 years.Trustees of the College Board, which administers the national test, were to meet in New York today and tomorrow to consider restructuring the exam, in a move to make it harder to coach students for the test and to make the exam more attuned to schoolwork.Although the specific proposals are secret, some board members disclosed that they include introducing more essay-type questions, allowing students to use calculators and adding mathematics problems without multiple-choice answers.
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