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By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,Special to the Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2008
Leaping horses, socializing supporters and a family-friendly atmosphere have drawn spectators to Howard Community College's Grand Prix for 20 years. But the true appeal for organizers has always been the scholarship money it raises for students. The equestrians and the entertainment will return to the Columbia campus Saturday, and college officials say the need is greater than ever. Applications for financial aid have risen 19 percent from fall 2007 to this year, said Nancy Santos Gainer, an HCC spokeswoman.
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NEWS
By Colin Campbell and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2013
Millions of dollars in scholarship money that the state could have provided to about 8,000 needy college students has sat untouched, according to an audit released Wednesday. Auditors from the Office of Legislative Audits found that the Maryland Higher Education Commission did not spend all of the money in its scholarship fund, with the number growing from $9.9 million in 2011 to $17.2 million this year. Auditors estimated that the $17 million could have paid for the scholarships of about 7,800 of the 16,400 students on a waiting list.
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FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2005
The worst moment of the pageant came soon after the teenager walked on stage: She flubbed the aerobic fitness routine. Ronke Olaleye was concentrating so much on smiling, on convincing the audience that she was "high energy," she says, that she forgot the steps she had rehearsed all week. Always resourceful, though, the 16-year- old improvised a few moves and rejoined the other contestants. She prayed her smile hid her disappointment - and shifted her remaining hopes into positive thoughts about her vocal performance.
EXPLORE
June 10, 2013
Bel Air High School graduate Xuan Bui said she was really excited to learn she was selected as a recipient of a Jimmy Rane Foundation scholarship. It felt like her hard work of finding and completing scholarship applications had paid off, especially because the competition for scholarships has always seemed daunting to her. Biu plans to attend Massachusetts Institute of Technology; however, she has yet to declare a major. She says that 10 years from now, she hopes to have a job related to math or science.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2005
A group of students from an inner-city Chicago neighborhood listened recently as renowned neurosurgeon Ben Carson talked about nerds in the 'hood. He spoke about having lived as many of the students themselves live - the product of an impoverished, single-parent home, battling low self-esteem, poor grades and a white-hot temper. But when he got his act together and his grades improved, Carson found himself the brunt of derision and ridicule from fellow students who thought rebelling against book learning was cool.
NEWS
June 8, 2012
It was exciting to hear that Ryan Ripken received a full scholarship to attend the University of South Carolina ("O's draft one more Ripken - Cal's son," June 7). How proud parents Cal Ripken Jr. and Kelly Ripken must be. But, wouldn't it have been much nicer if we also heard was Cal has decided to forgo the scholarship money so another child could attend the college? They certainly can afford to pay for their child and should donate the money back to the school. Janet Silverman, Pikesville
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | October 7, 1992
Saying he no longer has hope that the Maryland General Assembly will give up the power to distribute millions of dollars in state scholarships, Del. Gerry Brewster has decided to relinquish his own power to distribute the funds.The Baltimore County Democrat has asked the State Scholarship Administration to award his share of the scholarship money to students in his district on the basis of need. Each state delegate is given $41,712 in scholarship money to disburse over a four-year period.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2010
Many people view the role of school counselors mainly as providing emotional nurturing while supporting students in their goals and aspirations, says Gayle Cicero, the counseling coordinator for Anne Arundel County schools. And the thought of counselors working to ensure that federal No Child Left Behind goals are met or that schools steadily draw money for students to attend college would seem foreign to some. But today, Cicero says, the best guidance counselors work side by side with teachers to ensure that students excel as early as elementary school and continue to do so after graduating from high school.
NEWS
By Jennifer Marshall
The Baltimore Sun
| June 9, 2013
The two-man team from Eastern Technical High School faced a challenge: discover about a dozen "bugs" in a car, fix them, and restore the car to acceptable condition - all within 90 minutes. Seniors Anthony Critcher and Brik Wisniewski did it in just 41 minutes - while compiling the first perfect score in 24 years in the Ford/AAA Student Auto Skills competition for Maryland. With that victory in April, the 18-year-olds earned a spot in the national finals in Dearborn, Mich., the home of Ford Motor Co. The competition begins today.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Mike Bowler contributed to this article | December 4, 1994
After years of political stalemate in Annapolis, the most powerful supporter of the state legislature's one-of-a-kind scholarship program says he will back a bill next year to eventually eliminate it.While details remain hazy, Sen. President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr. said he expects legislation that would eliminate the program within four years or phase it out over the same time period. The pool of scholarship funds -- $7.9 million this year -- might then be allocated by the apolitical state scholarship administration or at the community level, he said.
NEWS
By Jennifer Marshall
The Baltimore Sun
| June 9, 2013
The two-man team from Eastern Technical High School faced a challenge: discover about a dozen "bugs" in a car, fix them, and restore the car to acceptable condition - all within 90 minutes. Seniors Anthony Critcher and Brik Wisniewski did it in just 41 minutes - while compiling the first perfect score in 24 years in the Ford/AAA Student Auto Skills competition for Maryland. With that victory in April, the 18-year-olds earned a spot in the national finals in Dearborn, Mich., the home of Ford Motor Co. The competition begins today.
SPORTS
By Ellen Fishel, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2013
After Hunter Machin bowled his first 300 in late January, he celebrated in a pretty nontraditional way: He went home and took a nap. But Machin's perfect game was anything but traditional - after all, he was only 12 years old. While most of his fellow seventh graders at Dundalk Middle School are focusing on homework and playing with friends, Machin is busy at the bowling alley, winning tournaments against kids more than six years his senior and...
NEWS
June 8, 2012
It was exciting to hear that Ryan Ripken received a full scholarship to attend the University of South Carolina ("O's draft one more Ripken - Cal's son," June 7). How proud parents Cal Ripken Jr. and Kelly Ripken must be. But, wouldn't it have been much nicer if we also heard was Cal has decided to forgo the scholarship money so another child could attend the college? They certainly can afford to pay for their child and should donate the money back to the school. Janet Silverman, Pikesville
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2012
Elizabeth McKenrick Winstead, an award-winning knitter and Bryn Mawr School graduate who established a scholarship fund there, died Tuesday of cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. She was 73. Mrs. Winstead, who went by the nickname Libby, was born in Baltimore in 1939. She was the eldest of three girls. Her father, a lawyer, served in the armed forces during World War II. During his absence, the girls and their mother moved to Pennsylvania to live with relatives. In early 1946, Mrs. Winstead's family returned to Baltimore, settling on North Charles Street near the city-county border.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2010
Many people view the role of school counselors mainly as providing emotional nurturing while supporting students in their goals and aspirations, says Gayle Cicero, the counseling coordinator for Anne Arundel County schools. And the thought of counselors working to ensure that federal No Child Left Behind goals are met or that schools steadily draw money for students to attend college would seem foreign to some. But today, Cicero says, the best guidance counselors work side by side with teachers to ensure that students excel as early as elementary school and continue to do so after graduating from high school.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2008
Keisha Hogan, 28, of Columbia said that without a scholarship to Howard Community College, she would have to work more hours, which would be difficult to balance with classes, studying and caring for two children. "Every little bit [of scholarship money] works towards something, because college costs," said Hogan, who has a 9-year-old son and 8-year-old daughter. "Scholarships allow us to free up the time to go to school." Last week, Hogan and more than 80 other students had an opportunity to express their appreciation in person to the sources of their financial support at HCC's student/donor reception on the Columbia campus.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,SUN REPORTER | June 27, 2008
A senior official in the state comptroller's office has recommended that legislative auditors look into "unusual" accounting practices at the Maryland Higher Education Commission. John D. Kenney, director of the General Accounting Division, also said yesterday that he will ask the commission's chief of accounting to stop spending money out of a "nonbudgeted" state account - where spending authority controls are less stringent. The account has included millions in federal grant money. Generally, nonbudgeted funds in the state treasury are used as temporary holding accounts for money that is not appropriated by the General Assembly.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | February 24, 2005
In support of Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s proposal to increase need-based student financial aid, two lawmakers urged a Senate committee yesterday to back bills that would transfer most or all of the money in Maryland's legislative scholarship program to a need-based fund. Sen. Sandra B. Schrader, a Howard County Republican, and Sen. James Brochin, a Baltimore County Democrat, are pushing two different bills, but both told the Senate Education, Health and Environment Committee that they believe it is time to change how the $11 million in legislative scholarship money is distributed.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,Special to the Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2008
Leaping horses, socializing supporters and a family-friendly atmosphere have drawn spectators to Howard Community College's Grand Prix for 20 years. But the true appeal for organizers has always been the scholarship money it raises for students. The equestrians and the entertainment will return to the Columbia campus Saturday, and college officials say the need is greater than ever. Applications for financial aid have risen 19 percent from fall 2007 to this year, said Nancy Santos Gainer, an HCC spokeswoman.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,SUN REPORTER | June 27, 2008
A senior official in the state comptroller's office has recommended that legislative auditors look into "unusual" accounting practices at the Maryland Higher Education Commission. John D. Kenney, director of the General Accounting Division, also said yesterday that he will ask the commission's chief of accounting to stop spending money out of a "nonbudgeted" state account - where spending authority controls are less stringent. The account has included millions in federal grant money. Generally, nonbudgeted funds in the state treasury are used as temporary holding accounts for money that is not appropriated by the General Assembly.
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