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By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | October 7, 1992
Saying he no longer has hope that the Maryland General Assembly will give up the power to distribute millions of dollars in state scholarships, Del. Gerry Brewster has decided to relinquish his own power to distribute the funds.The Baltimore County Democrat has asked the State Scholarship Administration to award his share of the scholarship money to students in his district on the basis of need. Each state delegate is given $41,712 in scholarship money to disburse over a four-year period.
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NEWS
March 18, 1994
State Sen. Clarence Blount of Baltimore has long been able to fend off reform of Maryland's legislative scholarship program by claiming minority students would suffer if minority lawmakers, such as Mr. Blount, lost the power to award college aid.But last year the state issued a report that let all the air out of the senator's argument. It showed that minority students receive more financial assistance from the state's need-oriented Scholarship Administration than from lawmakers. This finding explains why the Maryland chapter of the NAACP and Mr. Blount's own black college fraternity, the prestigious Alpha Phi Alpha, have joined the movement to shift the legislators' kitty to the Scholarship Administration's control.
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NEWS
December 16, 1991
A Baltimore County lawmaker said he plans to sponsor a bill in the 1992 General Assembly that would end a House of Delegates program that currently allows members to hand out money for college scholarships based on their own criteria rather than on need.Del. Gerry Brewster, D-Baltimore County, said the bill would allow the State Scholarship Administration to award the money directly to students, instead of first to delegates, who then dole it out as patronage.Maryland is the only state in the nation that permits legislators to award scholarships to constituents, Brewster said.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Sun Staff Writer | March 16, 1994
With four weeks left in the 1994 session, people who want to reform Maryland's legislative scholarship program turned up the heat yesterday on one of the program's biggest defenders, state Sen. Clarence W. Blount.A coalition of public interest, student and minority groups -- including Mr. Blount's own college fraternity -- called for an end to a program that allows state legislators to hand out $7.9 million a year in college aid to constituents.Instead, witnesses told the Economic and Environmental Affairs Committee, the nonpolitical State Scholarship Administration should do the honors, as it does with the rest of Maryland's $31 million in financial aid for college students.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Staff Writer | March 16, 1993
When it comes to their one-of-a-kind scholarship program, Maryland state legislators can't "win for losing," Sen. Leo E. Green complained yesterday.First, the media keep beating them up over the $7 million program by calling it a perk of political office, the senator said.Second, reporters keep singling out -- unfairly in his view -- those cases in which senators award college scholarships to the children of campaign workers, party officials and wealthy constituents.Mr. Green, D-Prince George's, was trying to persuade the Senate Economic and Environmental Affairs Committee to pass his bill reforming the scholarship program.
NEWS
March 18, 1994
State Sen. Clarence Blount of Baltimore has long been able to fend off reform of Maryland's legislative scholarship program by claiming minority students would suffer if minority lawmakers, such as Mr. Blount, lost the power to award college aid.But last year the state issued a report that let all the air out of the senator's argument. It showed that minority students receive more financial assistance from the state's need-oriented Scholarship Administration than from lawmakers. This finding explains why the Maryland chapter of the NAACP and Mr. Blount's own black college fraternity, the prestigious Alpha Phi Alpha, have joined the movement to shift the legislators' kitty to the Scholarship Administration's control.
NEWS
October 15, 1992
By bowing out of the state-funded legislative scholarship program, eight Maryland lawmakers hope to shame their colleagues into recognizing that the 124-year-old program should be abolished.Del. Gerry Brewster (D-Baltimore County) is the latest to surrender his portion of the scholarship kitty.And what a kitty! During this fiscal year, the 140 members of the House of Delegates will hand out $1.47 million in scholarships, while the Senate's 47 members will award a total of $5.8 million.To some Marylanders, the program has become an embarrassment, and not just because ours is the only state in the nation practicing such largess.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | January 23, 1991
Because some state lawmakers have abused the senatorial and delegatescholarship programs, two Anne Arundel delegates want legislators topublicize who they award scholarships to each year.Delegates Elizabeth S. Smith, R-Davidsonville, and John Gary, R-Millersville, saidthey hope their proposal will quiet a movement to eliminate the $6.4million programs altogether.Their bill, introduced last week, would require lawmakers to filean annual report with the State Scholarship Administration listing the names and addresses of scholarship recipients that year.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Sun Staff Writer | March 16, 1994
With four weeks left in the 1994 session, people who want to reform Maryland's legislative scholarship program turned up the heat yesterday on one of the program's biggest defenders, state Sen. Clarence W. Blount.A coalition of public interest, student and minority groups -- including Mr. Blount's own college fraternity -- called for an end to a program that allows state legislators to hand out $7.9 million a year in college aid to constituents.Instead, witnesses told the Economic and Environmental Affairs Committee, the nonpolitical State Scholarship Administration should do the honors, as it does with the rest of Maryland's $31 million in financial aid for college students.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Staff Writer | March 20, 1993
An indignant Senate committee yesterday refused to kill one of the General Assembly's most cherished political perks, the $7 million legislative scholarship program.By a 7-4 vote, the Economic and Environmental Affairs Committee rejected a House bill that would have removed state legislators from the business of awarding college scholarships. The money they award would have been turned over to a nonpolitical state agency to distribute to students.A few committee members blasted the news media in general, and The Sun in particular, for stirring up the public and planting doubts about politicians' integrity.
NEWS
March 9, 1994
A scandalous performance at the MechanicI have attended productions at the Morris Mechanic Theater for many years, and for the past three years I have been a season subscriber. While realizing that I would not be enthralled by every production, I at least thought I would be exposed to high quality performances.On Feb. 27, I attended the anniversary presentation of "Hair." Never have I witnessed such a revolting, insulting, obscene performance. I sat mortified in my chair with averted eyes for an hour and 20 minutes because I was too embarrassed to look at the disgusting, degrading actions taking place on stage.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Staff Writer | March 20, 1993
An indignant Senate committee yesterday refused to kill one of the General Assembly's most cherished political perks, the $7 million legislative scholarship program.By a 7-4 vote, the Economic and Environmental Affairs Committee rejected a House bill that would have removed state legislators from the business of awarding college scholarships. The money they award would have been turned over to a nonpolitical state agency to distribute to students.A few committee members blasted the news media in general, and The Sun in particular, for stirring up the public and planting doubts about politicians' integrity.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Staff Writer | March 16, 1993
When it comes to their one-of-a-kind scholarship program, Maryland state legislators can't "win for losing," Sen. Leo E. Green complained yesterday.First, the media keep beating them up over the $7 million program by calling it a perk of political office, the senator said.Second, reporters keep singling out -- unfairly in his view -- those cases in which senators award college scholarships to the children of campaign workers, party officials and wealthy constituents.Mr. Green, D-Prince George's, was trying to persuade the Senate Economic and Environmental Affairs Committee to pass his bill reforming the scholarship program.
NEWS
October 15, 1992
By bowing out of the state-funded legislative scholarship program, eight Maryland lawmakers hope to shame their colleagues into recognizing that the 124-year-old program should be abolished.Del. Gerry Brewster (D-Baltimore County) is the latest to surrender his portion of the scholarship kitty.And what a kitty! During this fiscal year, the 140 members of the House of Delegates will hand out $1.47 million in scholarships, while the Senate's 47 members will award a total of $5.8 million.To some Marylanders, the program has become an embarrassment, and not just because ours is the only state in the nation practicing such largess.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | October 7, 1992
Saying he no longer has hope that the Maryland General Assembly will give up the power to distribute millions of dollars in state scholarships, Del. Gerry Brewster has decided to relinquish his own power to distribute the funds.The Baltimore County Democrat has asked the State Scholarship Administration to award his share of the scholarship money to students in his district on the basis of need. Each state delegate is given $41,712 in scholarship money to disburse over a four-year period.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Annapolis Bureau | February 9, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- While Maryland legislators are cutting almost everything else this session, the odds are good they'll hold onto one of their most cherished political perks -- the $6.4 million scholarship fund they dole out to constituents.Despite attacks from critics, particularly in the Republican minority, the program is likely to survive as the only one of its kind in the nation -- one that gives each senator more than $100,000 a year to disburse with no oversight and few rules."Let's face it, if you've given out a scholarship to somebody, that person and that person's family will owe a certain debt to you," said Del. John S. Morgan, R-Howard, who received a senatorial scholarship in graduate school.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Annapolis Bureau | February 9, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- While Maryland legislators are cutting almost everything else this session, the odds are good they'll hold onto one of their most cherished political perks -- the $6.4 million scholarship fund they dole out to constituents.Despite attacks from critics, particularly in the Republican minority, the program is likely to survive as the only one of its kind in the nation -- one that gives each senator more than $100,000 a year to disburse with no oversight and few rules."Let's face it, if you've given out a scholarship to somebody, that person and that person's family will owe a certain debt to you," said Del. John S. Morgan, R-Howard, who received a senatorial scholarship in graduate school.
NEWS
March 9, 1994
A scandalous performance at the MechanicI have attended productions at the Morris Mechanic Theater for many years, and for the past three years I have been a season subscriber. While realizing that I would not be enthralled by every production, I at least thought I would be exposed to high quality performances.On Feb. 27, I attended the anniversary presentation of "Hair." Never have I witnessed such a revolting, insulting, obscene performance. I sat mortified in my chair with averted eyes for an hour and 20 minutes because I was too embarrassed to look at the disgusting, degrading actions taking place on stage.
NEWS
December 16, 1991
A Baltimore County lawmaker said he plans to sponsor a bill in the 1992 General Assembly that would end a House of Delegates program that currently allows members to hand out money for college scholarships based on their own criteria rather than on need.Del. Gerry Brewster, D-Baltimore County, said the bill would allow the State Scholarship Administration to award the money directly to students, instead of first to delegates, who then dole it out as patronage.Maryland is the only state in the nation that permits legislators to award scholarships to constituents, Brewster said.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | January 23, 1991
Because some state lawmakers have abused the senatorial and delegatescholarship programs, two Anne Arundel delegates want legislators topublicize who they award scholarships to each year.Delegates Elizabeth S. Smith, R-Davidsonville, and John Gary, R-Millersville, saidthey hope their proposal will quiet a movement to eliminate the $6.4million programs altogether.Their bill, introduced last week, would require lawmakers to filean annual report with the State Scholarship Administration listing the names and addresses of scholarship recipients that year.
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