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By MICHAEL OLESKER | March 22, 1998
Ray Schoenke's conversation is peppered with names out of history -- not only Vince Lombardi and George Allen, whom you'd expect, but George McGovern and Richard Nixon, too. He's got a pretty good riff. But nobody knows if he can connect his life in pro football and on the political fringes to his bid to be governor of Maryland.Among the Democrats, the line to unseat Parris Glendening begins with Schoenke and Harford County's Eileen Rehrmann. But the line's still forming. The newspaper articles say the feds keep asking for more of Glendening's financial records.
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NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | July 31, 1998
Montgomery County businessman Raymond F. Schoenke Jr. spent more than $2 million of his own money to underwrite his aborted bid for governor. Now, he is reaching deeper into his pockets to return $250,000 in campaign contributions from supporters who backed his candidacy.Schoenke, a former Washington Redskins offensive lineman and insurance brokerage owner, is sending back all the money contributed to his campaign -- donations ranging from $25 to $4,000 -- that was given by more than 400 people who took a chance on his long-shot candidacy.
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NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | June 12, 1998
Democratic gubernatorial candidate Raymond F. Schoenke Jr., who is paying for his campaign largely with his personal fortune, declared yesterday he would accept no money from "special interest" political action committees in general and the gambling industry specifically.Calling on his opponents to do the same, Schoenke said the move was necessary to assure the public that he would not be beholden to such interest groups."We have to make a statement that we will return the government back to the people," Schoenke said during a news conference in downtown Baltimore.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Michael Dresser and Craig Timberg contributed to this article | July 7, 1998
Resisting the allure of a more winnable contest, Harford County Executive Eileen M. Rehrmann resolved again yesterday to oust her party's incumbent governor, Parris N. Glendening -- a decision that promises a spirited Democratic gubernatorial primary.The death of Comptroller Louis L. Goldstein on Friday presented unexpected opportunity which, Rehrmann said, a number of Democrats urged her to take.But she said voters across the state are hungry for the reliability she promises."We have a governor who's more interested in his future than Maryland's future," she said.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | February 20, 1998
Their first gubernatorial confrontation of the 1998 election year in Maryland came yesterday among the high rollers.Raymond F. Schoenke Jr., the wealthy insurance company executive from Laytonsville, was meeting Gov. Parris N. Glendening for the first time since Schoenke declared on Jan. 20 that he would challenge Glendening in this year's Democratic primary.Glendening and Schoenke met during President Clinton's fund-raiser luncheon at the Harbor Court Hotel -- an event attended by 25 or so contributors who paid as much as $25,000 to be there.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | April 17, 1998
If the name Ray Schoenke doesn't ring a bell, wait a couple of weeks.Starting Monday, the Redskin-turned-insurance-magnate plans to run an extraordinarily early, heavy ad campaign for his run for governor.Local television viewers can expect to see the spots -- including a short biography and a couple of swipes at Gov. Parris N. Glendening -- dozens of times by early next month.The trend nationwide is toward earlier television advertising in races considered tight, particularly when candidates such as Schoenke, a Democrat, bring millions of dollars of their own money to the campaign.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | May 18, 1998
Ray Schoenke never made more than $50,000 a year as an offensive lineman in the National Football League.Today, 22 years after he left the game, Schoenke says he is worth about $20 million -- a fortune that is largely fueling his uphill run to be governor of Maryland.Schoenke, 56, got rich selling big-ticket insurance to some of the area's best-known businesses -- policies designed to boost the retirement benefits of their top corporate executives.The former Washington Redskin became a major insurance player over the past two decades by aggressively carving out a niche in a new market in which the potential profits were soaring and the competition cutthroat.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | June 16, 1998
Millionaire Democrat Raymond F. Schoenke Jr. announced yesterday he is selling the insurance brokerage that made him the fortune largely fueling his quest to become governor of Maryland.Schoenke, who has pledged to spend $2 million or more of his own money and has purchased a flood of television commercials, said he wants to concentrate all his efforts on his uphill gubernatorial campaign."I'm excited by the opportunity to close this chapter and open a new chapter," he said at his firm's headquarters in Germantown, Montgomery County.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | January 10, 1998
Raymond F. Schoenke Jr., a former Washington Redskins football player who made a fortune selling insurance, says he will enter the Democratic primary for governor within 10 days, bringing a campaign fund of $2 million and a sharp critique of Gov. Parris N. Glendening.A three-page letter announcing his decision to run went out Monday to 7,700 Marylanders, Republicans and Democrats, said Chuck Miller, the Schoenke campaign's press secretary.In a copy of the letter obtained by The Sun, Schoenke says Glendening "has been happy to sit contentedly on the sidelines and take credit for America's economic surge while raising campaign money instead of test scores."
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | January 21, 1998
With little name recognition but a large bankroll, insurance executive Raymond F. Schoenke Jr. made his political debut yesterday by launching a bid to become Maryland's next governor.Most often recognized as a former Washington Redskins football player, the successful businessman from Montgomery County entered the Democratic contest with $2 million of his own money and a denunciation of his party's incumbent, Gov. Parris N. Glendening.In his first campaign speech, delivered at a noon rally in the shadow of the State House, Schoenke promised to bring his business expertise to running state government and offered general criticisms of Glendening but few specifics for change.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Craig Timberg and Thomas W. Waldron and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Neal Thompson contributed to this article | July 6, 1998
With a critical deadline looming tonight, Maryland politicians are scrambling to find a successor to the late Louis L. Goldstein as state comptroller from a wide open field that includes Montgomery County Executive Douglas M. Duncan and former Gov. William Donald Schaefer.Also today, Democrat Ray Schoenke is expected to abandon his bid to become governor after showing scant progress in the polls, said sources familiar with his thinking.But the day could be dominated by Gov. Parris N. Glendening's choice to fill the comptroller's post, held for almost 40 years by Goldstein.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | June 24, 1998
Barry Levinson, bless him, is expected to make another semi-autobiographical movie in Baltimore. Production could start later this summer or in the early fall on "Liberty Heights," set here in 1954 and 1955, the fourth installment in Levinson's wonderful series of Baltimore films ("Diner," "Tin Men" and "Avalon"). This will be the first collaboration after the merger of Levinson's Baltimore Pictures and Spring Creek Productions, led by Paula Weinstein. Levinson told Variety this week that "Liberty Heights" picks up a story line from the middle of "Avalon" (in my humble opinion, the best of the Baltimore films)
NEWS
June 18, 1998
THEY'RE everywhere! You know it's campaign season when the candidates for governor are splayed so broadly across the local landscape it resembles a military invasion.There's Parris N. Glendening staging multiple media events to publicize the formal kickoff of his re-election bid.There's Eileen M. Rehrmann announcing her running mate, veteran Montgomery County politician-businessman Sidney Kramer.There's Republican front-runner Ellen R. Sauerbrey playing host to New York Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani at a skybox fund-raiser at Camden Yards, then announcing her surprise choice for lieutenant governor, moderate Richard D. Bennett, a former U.S. attorney for Maryland.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | June 16, 1998
Millionaire Democrat Raymond F. Schoenke Jr. announced yesterday he is selling the insurance brokerage that made him the fortune largely fueling his quest to become governor of Maryland.Schoenke, who has pledged to spend $2 million or more of his own money and has purchased a flood of television commercials, said he wants to concentrate all his efforts on his uphill gubernatorial campaign."I'm excited by the opportunity to close this chapter and open a new chapter," he said at his firm's headquarters in Germantown, Montgomery County.
NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | June 14, 1998
IN POLITICS, money can't buy happiness. Al Checchi found that out two weeks ago in California. Ray Schoenke, and perhaps Jim Brady, are likely to find this applies in Maryland, too.Mr. Checchi spent a staggering $40 million of his own money on his gubernatorial race, saturating California airwaves. Yet when the primary votes were counted, he was humiliated: Gray Davis, a career state politician with as much charisma as a wet rag, won in a landslide. It was his prior experience that made the difference, according to exit polls.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | June 12, 1998
Democratic gubernatorial candidate Raymond F. Schoenke Jr., who is paying for his campaign largely with his personal fortune, declared yesterday he would accept no money from "special interest" political action committees in general and the gambling industry specifically.Calling on his opponents to do the same, Schoenke said the move was necessary to assure the public that he would not be beholden to such interest groups."We have to make a statement that we will return the government back to the people," Schoenke said during a news conference in downtown Baltimore.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | August 21, 1997
Potential challengers to Gov. Parris N. Glendening's re-election now include a highly successful Montgomery County businessman and former Washington Redskins football player Raymond F. Schoenke Jr.The 55-year-old insurance company president is a Special Olympics pioneer in Maryland and a generous contributor to the Democratic National Committee who has been active in national party affairs since the 1960s."
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | July 31, 1998
Montgomery County businessman Raymond F. Schoenke Jr. spent more than $2 million of his own money to underwrite his aborted bid for governor. Now, he is reaching deeper into his pockets to return $250,000 in campaign contributions from supporters who backed his candidacy.Schoenke, a former Washington Redskins offensive lineman and insurance brokerage owner, is sending back all the money contributed to his campaign -- donations ranging from $25 to $4,000 -- that was given by more than 400 people who took a chance on his long-shot candidacy.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | June 11, 1998
Looking to geographically balance her Democratic gubernatorial ticket, candidate Eileen M. Rehrmann has picked former Montgomery County Executive Sidney Kramer as her running mate, sources knowledgeable about the selection said yesterday.Rehrmann campaign officials refused to confirm or deny the selection, but sources said the two-term Harford County executive would announce her selection of Kramer Monday.In Kramer, Rehrmann is choosing a veteran politician from the state's most populous jurisdiction, someone who may broaden her appeal in the Washington suburbs.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1998
An article in yesterday's editions of The Sun incorrectly described Democratic gubernatorial candidate Terry McGuire's position on slot machine gambling. He is opposed to slot machines at horse tracks. But he said he would support a statewide referendum on whether to allow state-owned and -operated slot machines at three to five locations, with 10 percent of the proceeds going to racing purses and the remainder earmarked for tax relief.A headline for the same article suggested incorrectly that a television advertisement for Raymond F. Schoenke Jr. proposes to pay for educational programs with revenues from slot machines.
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