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NEWS
April 17, 1992
Selina Schoenfeld, who taught in Baltimore public schools for over 30 years, died Wednesday of cancer at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The resident of Park Heights Avenue was 81.Services for Mrs. Schoenfeld were being held today at Sol Levinson & Bros. funeral establishment, 6010 Reisterstown Road.She retired in 1977 as a reading specialist at Cross Country Elementary School.The former Selina Rabinowitz was a native of Baltimore and a graduate of Eastern High School and the teachers' college that is now Towson State University.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2012
Inside a two-story, cylindrical metal structure at Aberdeen Proving Ground, scientists detonate a homemade bomb to take high-speed pictures of the shrapnel flying apart. Elsewhere on the Army installation in Harford County, soldiers train on radio jammers intended to render enemy remote controls useless. At still another location, inventors work on hand-held test kits that will enable troops to identify chemicals used by bomb makers. All of the activity is aimed at stopping the signature weapon of the enemy in Afghanistan and Iraq: the improvised explosive device, the IED, which has been responsible for more than half the American combat deaths over the past decade and many of the brain injuries and amputations.
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NEWS
April 12, 2003
ROSE EVELYN SCHOENFELD, 92, passed away Thursday, April 10, 2003 in Manassas, VA. Wife of the late Henry Schoenfeld; beloved mother of Harvey (Marcia) and Gary (Jacqueline); adored grandmother of Craig, Debra, Richard, Ryan and Sharon. Services will be held Monday, April 4, 2003, Star of David Memorial Chapel, N. Lauderdale, FL.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 15, 2010
Dr. Charles N. "Chaz" Schoenfeld, retired vice chairman of emergency medicine at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center who was an acknowledged expert in the field of emergency medicine, died Friday of complications from cancer at his Middle River home. He was 60. Charles Nicholas Schoenfeld, the son of a career naval officer and a homemaker, was born in Boston and raised at various military posts where his father served. After graduating from Annapolis High School in 1968, he earned a bachelor's degree from the University of Maryland, College Park in 1972.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Sun Staff Writer | February 1, 1994
For Jim Schoenfeld, who has been the Washington Capitals head coach for six days, the honeymoon is over."We are looking for instant results," said Capitals team president Dick Patrick. "There is no time to slip back or even hold steady. We need to win to make the playoffs."It is up to Schoenfeld, who replaced coach Terry Murray Thursday, to get the job done. And Schoenfeld has a record for rallies. He took over the New Jersey Devils with 30 games left in 1987-88 and took them to within one game of the Stanley Cup finals.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Sun Staff Writer | March 12, 1994
Washington Capitals coach Jim Schoenfeld is one of the most positive men anyone could hope to meet.Even after back-to-back losses to Boston and the New York Rangers this week, which revealed some of the Capitals old inconsistencies, and learning that injured goalie Rick Tabaracci will be unable to even skate again until the middle of next week, Schoenfeld said he is sure his message is getting through."
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Sun Staff Writer | March 14, 1994
The Washington Capitals have blown leads in four of their past five games -- including Saturday's 4-3 loss to the Quebec Nordiques -- but coach Jim Schoenfeld says the problem is with a few individuals rather than the whole team."
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Sun Staff Writer | April 9, 1994
With the playoffs looming and the Washington Capitals struggling toward the finish line, team owner Abe Pollin came to practice yesterday for the first time in the memory of his longest-serving players."
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | February 1, 1994
LANDOVER -- It was a strange situation to say the least. "One instant," said Jim Schoenfeld, "it was an hour before the game and I was walking around saying, 'Nice to meet you,' and the next I was saying, 'Let's get ready to play.' "But the new coach of the Washington Capitals knew of the team all right, probably better than some of the people who have been calling the shots for the club the last few years."When I was playing [13 seasons] and coaching [three seasons, two teams], the personnel was different, but the Caps were known as hard workers.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Staff Writer | January 29, 1994
The Washington Capitals' new coach, Jim Schoenfeld, is going into this job with his eyes wide-open."It is a big job," he said last night from Philadelphia, where the Capitals will play the Flyers today. "The team is achieving well under expectations. I've got a group of players who aren't very resilient mentally. When something goes wrong, they expect the situation to get worse, not better."This is a team that has dug itself a points hole, to the point of being out of the playoffs, and an emotional and mental hole.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 17, 2010
Henry F. "Hank" Schoenfeld, a Baltimore insurance executive and philanthropist who enjoyed flying family and friends in his twin-engine Beechcraft Baron, died Sept. 11 of pancreatic cancer at his Stevenson home. He was 82. Mr. Schoenfeld, the son of a salesman and a homemaker, was born in Nuremberg, Germany, and spent his early years there and later in Munich, which coincided with the rise of Nazism. "They knew trouble was coming. His father, who sold clothing, was finally told by his customers that they could not longer buy from a Jew," said a daughter, Judy Schoenfeld Morrison of Pikesville.
NEWS
March 16, 2005
Frances G. Schoenfelder, a homemaker who participated in the first human flag ceremony at Fort McHenry, died March 9 at Glynn Taff Assisted Living in Catonsville. She was 104. In 1914, when she was 13, the former Frances G. Drenner took a streetcar with classmates from their elementary school on Old Frederick Road to Fort McHenry. She donned a hooded red cape and joined about 6,000 Baltimore children in the flag formation that has become a springtime tradition. She often pulled out the sepia-toned photograph of the event and recalled that she stood in the second red stripe.
NEWS
March 13, 2005
On Wednesday, March 9, 2005, FRANCES GEORGETTA SCHOENFELDER, of Linthicum Heights. Beloved wife of the late Henry D. Schoenfelder; loving mother of Thelma Sikorski, Henry Schoenfelder, Jr., and Edwin Schoenfelder; cherished grandmother of eight and great-grandmother of 17; dear sister of Dewey Drenner and Doris Schneider and the late Naomi Beck, Herbert (Ben) Drenner, Nellie Bell and Donald Drenner; beloved daughter of the late Herbert and Georgette Drenner; dear mother-in-law of the late E. Berkeley Schoenfelder and John Sikorski.
NEWS
February 5, 2005
E. Berkeley Schoenfelder, a retirement community receptionist and Frederick resident, died of pulmonary failure Jan. 29 at Washington Hospital Center. She was 74. Evelyn Berkeley Ludwig was born in Baltimore and raised in Baltimore Highlands. She was a 1948 graduate of Catonsville High School. For more than 20 years, Mrs. Schoenfelder worked as an operating room receptionist and later secretary at what is now St. Agnes HealthCare in Southwest Baltimore. For the past 12 years, she had been a receptionist at Charlestown Retirement Community in Catonsville.
NEWS
April 12, 2003
ROSE EVELYN SCHOENFELD, 92, passed away Thursday, April 10, 2003 in Manassas, VA. Wife of the late Henry Schoenfeld; beloved mother of Harvey (Marcia) and Gary (Jacqueline); adored grandmother of Craig, Debra, Richard, Ryan and Sharon. Services will be held Monday, April 4, 2003, Star of David Memorial Chapel, N. Lauderdale, FL.
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