Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSchoeneman
IN THE NEWS

Schoeneman

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | August 23, 1994
J. Schoeneman Inc., a 105-year-old manufacturer of menswear, will close its Owings Mills distribution center and move that work to its main factory in Chambersburg, Pa.The decision will move 55 jobs out of state. But Schoeneman said its headquarters, which employs 145 people, will stay in Baltimore County at a yet undetermined site.The action comes shortly after the state has suffered two other economic setbacks -- the announcement by London Fog Corp. that it will close three Maryland plants and lay off 700 workers by the end of October, and the decision by Starbucks Corp.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 24, 1997
Josepha Schoeneman Weiler Miller, whose philanthropy benefited a wide range of organizations, died of cancer Tuesday at her Pikesville residence. She was 92.A person of abundant energy and voluminous interests, Mrs. Miller supported hospitals, museums, the performing arts and education."
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Sun Staff Writer | October 13, 1994
Tough times in the apparel industry will cost more Maryland workers their jobs.J. Schoeneman Inc., a 105 year-old manufacturer of menswear, said yesterday that it will close its Gleneagles raincoat factory in Bel Air before the end of the year and lay off about 110 employees."
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | August 3, 1995
*TC James J. Stankovic, the former head of the Owings Mills menswear maker J. Schoeneman Inc., will now try his hand at tuxedos as the new president and chief executive officer of After Six Ltd.Mr. Stankovic, 52, replaces Saul B. Offit, who was one of the principals who bought the name of the Philadelphia-based company in 1993 and established its headquarters in the Golden Ring area of Baltimore County.Along with Mr. Stankovic's appointment, the company said it was undergoing a $16 million financial restructuring to handle its growing business.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | July 29, 1995
Plaid Clothing Group Inc. said yesterday that it will close its administrative center in Owings Mills, costing up to 50 jobs, because the company needs to cut out the duplication between its local staff and a bigger administrative center in Ohio as part of plans to emerge from bankruptcy court protection.Plaid, which on July 17 filed for bankruptcy court protection from creditors while it attempts to reorganize its finances, is the holding company that owns the old J. Schoeneman Inc. Schoeneman makes suits, raincoats and other tailored men's clothing under licenses from recognized designers such as Burberry's, Halston and Nicole Miller.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | October 21, 1992
Plaid Holding Corp., a New York-based company that owns a clothing maker in Owings Mills, completed the acquisition of the men's tailored clothing business of Crystal Brands Inc. of Southport, Conn., for an undisclosed amount yesterday.Plaid's only operating division is J. Schoeneman Inc., a leading manufacturer of men's tailored clothing, which is based here. There are about 300 workers at the local headquarters, according to James J. Stankovic, Schoeneman's president and chief executive officer.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Sun Staff Writer | December 1, 1994
The contrast couldn't be any starker.As former stock boy James J. Stankovic prepares to leave the top job at J. Schoeneman Inc., the reins of the apparel maker's corporate parent have been handed to Richard C. Marcus, who headed the glitzy Neiman-Marcus retail chain his grandfather founded.The corporate shake-up at the company that controls one of Maryland's last clothing manufacturers was both panned and praised by industry observers yesterday.Some claimed that Mr. Marcus would help Plaid Clothing Group Inc. by improving relations with retailers.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | March 5, 1992
J. Schoeneman Inc., an Owings Mills-based men's clothing maker, has landed an exclusive license to manufacture and distribute Christian Dior suits, sports coats, trousers and rainwear in the United States.James Stankovic, Schoeneman's president, said yesterday that the agreement could bring about $25 million in new sales to the company, which now has annual sales of about $100 million.Schoeneman, a privately held company that has been based in Baltimore for 103 years, has its distribution center in Owings Mills, its manufacturing plant in Chambersburg, Pa., and its cutting operations in Wilmington, Del.The new license could add 250 jobs to the company's work force of 1,600 to 1,700, Mr. Stankovic said.
BUSINESS
By a Sun Staff Writer | November 30, 1994
James J. Stankovic, who dropped out of Merganthaler High School to take a stock boy's job at J. Schoeneman Inc. and worked his way up to company president, has announced he will leave the Owings Mills apparel maker by the end of the year.In a telephone interview from his New York office yesterday, the 51-year-old Baltimore native said the decision to end his 35-year career with Schoeneman was his."This is something that's been on my mind for a while," he said."If I'm going to change anything in my life, take a fresh approach, it should be now, when I have 15 or 20 years left," he said.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | August 3, 1995
*TC James J. Stankovic, the former head of the Owings Mills menswear maker J. Schoeneman Inc., will now try his hand at tuxedos as the new president and chief executive officer of After Six Ltd.Mr. Stankovic, 52, replaces Saul B. Offit, who was one of the principals who bought the name of the Philadelphia-based company in 1993 and established its headquarters in the Golden Ring area of Baltimore County.Along with Mr. Stankovic's appointment, the company said it was undergoing a $16 million financial restructuring to handle its growing business.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | July 29, 1995
Plaid Clothing Group Inc. said yesterday that it will close its administrative center in Owings Mills, costing up to 50 jobs, because the company needs to cut out the duplication between its local staff and a bigger administrative center in Ohio as part of plans to emerge from bankruptcy court protection.Plaid, which on July 17 filed for bankruptcy court protection from creditors while it attempts to reorganize its finances, is the holding company that owns the old J. Schoeneman Inc. Schoeneman makes suits, raincoats and other tailored men's clothing under licenses from recognized designers such as Burberry's, Halston and Nicole Miller.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Staff Writer | July 18, 1995
Blue jeans at the office claimed another victim yesterday. Plaid Clothing Group Inc., a big maker of men's tailored clothing and owner of J. Schoeneman Inc. in Owings Mills, sought protection from creditors in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in New York.Plaid, with assets of $195 million and liabilities of $177 million, will try to reorganize under Chapter 11 of the bankruptcy code and emerge "leaner, stronger and more focused," said Richard C. Marcus, the company's chief executive officer.That means cutting costs.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Sun Staff Writer | December 1, 1994
The contrast couldn't be any starker.As former stock boy James J. Stankovic prepares to leave the top job at J. Schoeneman Inc., the reins of the apparel maker's corporate parent have been handed to Richard C. Marcus, who headed the glitzy Neiman-Marcus retail chain his grandfather founded.The corporate shake-up at the company that controls one of Maryland's last clothing manufacturers was both panned and praised by industry observers yesterday.Some claimed that Mr. Marcus would help Plaid Clothing Group Inc. by improving relations with retailers.
BUSINESS
By a Sun Staff Writer | November 30, 1994
James J. Stankovic, who dropped out of Merganthaler High School to take a stock boy's job at J. Schoeneman Inc. and worked his way up to company president, has announced he will leave the Owings Mills apparel maker by the end of the year.In a telephone interview from his New York office yesterday, the 51-year-old Baltimore native said the decision to end his 35-year career with Schoeneman was his."This is something that's been on my mind for a while," he said."If I'm going to change anything in my life, take a fresh approach, it should be now, when I have 15 or 20 years left," he said.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | November 19, 1994
A deal by the parent company of J. Schoeneman Inc. of Owings Mills to buy the third-largest Italian clothing and textile firm has apparently fallen through, the victim of competing bids and national pride.Plaid Clothing Group Inc. of New York had negotiated for the last nine months to buy Gruppo Finanziaro Tessile GFT SpA for $250 million. The purchase would have created the world's largest tailored-clothing manufacturing company.But some of the 23 banks that hold about $276 million worth of GFT's debt turned thumbs down on the deal when other bids started to surface, according to the Daily News Record, a trade newspaper that covers the menswear business.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Sun Staff Writer | October 13, 1994
Tough times in the apparel industry will cost more Maryland workers their jobs.J. Schoeneman Inc., a 105 year-old manufacturer of menswear, said yesterday that it will close its Gleneagles raincoat factory in Bel Air before the end of the year and lay off about 110 employees."
BUSINESS
By Michelle Singletary and Michelle Singletary,Evening Sun Staff | August 28, 1991
J. Schoeneman Inc., the local clothing manufacturer best known for its private labels carried by Saks Fifth Avenue and Neiman Marcus, has been sold to its managers and a foreign investment group.Plaid Holdings Corp. and senior managers of Schoeneman announced yesterday Bidermann Industries Corp. had agreed to sell its subsidiary.Schoeneman was was part of Bidermann's acquisition last year of Cluett, Peabody & Co. The New York-based Bidermann is also a manufacturer of men's and women's designer clothing.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | September 30, 1993
J. Schoeneman Inc., an Owings Mills-based menswear manufacturer, has signed an exclusive license with designer Nicole Miller to produce and market her new line of men's, boys' and selected women's wear.The contract will not result in higher employment initially, although James J. Stankovic, Schoeneman's president and chief executive officer, said that "over the next few years, I feel confident it will add jobs." That will be determined, he said, on the demand for the clothing line.Nicole Miller is the latest addition to the Schoeneman stable of designer labels, including Burberry, Christian Dior and Halston.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | August 23, 1994
J. Schoeneman Inc., a 105-year-old manufacturer of menswear, will close its Owings Mills distribution center and move that work to its main factory in Chambersburg, Pa.The decision will move 55 jobs out of state. But Schoeneman said its headquarters, which employs 145 people, will stay in Baltimore County at a yet undetermined site.The action comes shortly after the state has suffered two other economic setbacks -- the announcement by London Fog Corp. that it will close three Maryland plants and lay off 700 workers by the end of October, and the decision by Starbucks Corp.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | September 30, 1993
J. Schoeneman Inc., an Owings Mills-based menswear manufacturer, has signed an exclusive license with designer Nicole Miller to produce and market her new line of men's, boys' and selected women's wear.The contract will not result in higher employment initially, although James J. Stankovic, Schoeneman's president and chief executive officer, said that "over the next few years, I feel confident it will add jobs." That will be determined, he said, on the demand for the clothing line.Nicole Miller is the latest addition to the Schoeneman stable of designer labels, including Burberry, Christian Dior and Halston.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.