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NEWS
November 19, 2008
On November 9, 2008, EMILY SCHLESINGER (nee Kemp), age 93, mother of Emily Hamilton, Kemp Schlesinger, Fran Johnson and Martin Schlesinger. Also survived by six grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. A memorial service will be held at Broadmead, 13801 York Road, Cockeysville at 10:30 a.m. November 22.
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NEWS
By Tricia Bishop
The Baltimore Sun
| October 7, 2013
Johns Hopkins University has named a new dean of its Whiting School of Engineering.  T.E. Schlesinger, who now heads the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University, will take over the Baltimore post in January.  Schlesinger collaborated with faculty to redesign Carnegie's undergraduate program and expand graduate offerings, Hopkins said in a statement, and he plans to use a similar approach here.  ...
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NEWS
June 12, 1992
The clamorous debate over political correctness has been turned up a notch by the publication of "The Disuniting of America," the latest book by venerable historian Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr. The slim volume recently spent a surprising 10 weeks on the New York Times best-seller list.Mr. Schlesinger argues that just as numerous nations of the post-Cold War world are splitting into smaller ethnic pockets, the United States is undergoing a similar experience in the way minorities are demanding and achieving school curricula that focus on the achievements of each group.
NEWS
By Gregory Rodriguez | May 3, 2009
I wonder what the late historian Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr. would have made of Texas Gov. Rick Perry's recent pandering to Lone Star secessionists. I'd love to hear what he'd say about Sarah Palin's flirtation with the Alaskan Independence Party and its disdain for the rest of the United States. Way back in 1991, Mr. Schlesinger wrote a bestselling book, The Disuniting of America, in which he argued that multiculturalism was threatening the integrity of the nation. "The cult of ethnicity," he wrote, culminated in an "attack" on a commonly shared American identity.
NEWS
By Larry Williams and Larry Williams,Ideas Editor | March 4, 2007
For Americans of a certain age, the death last week of Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr. marked the passing of the last eloquent articulator of America's 20th-century liberal dream, following the departure last May of his good friend John Kenneth Galbraith, a like-minded economist. A distinguished scholar, Schlesinger painted vast portions of the nation's history with vivid award-winning portraits of populist leaders from Andrew Jackson to Franklin Delano Roosevelt to Robert F. Kennedy. In a post-World War II era when Americans were suspicious of liberals with Communist leanings, Schlesinger articulated a muscular anti-Communist version of liberalism as a founder of Americans for Democratic Action.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Staff Writer | July 11, 1992
LAUREL -- A combination of the right trainer and some much-needed experience has thrust Victoria Schlesinger into the forefront of the nation's steeplechaser riders."
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Larry Carson and Joe Nawrozki and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | September 7, 1997
An article Sunday about the condemned Riverdale Apartments in Essex-Middle River incorrectly described the status of the property. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development has foreclosed on half of the complex; Chemical Bank, now part of Chase Manhattan Bank, holds a mortgage on the other half and has not foreclosed.The Sun regrets the errors.PALM BEACH, Fla. -- Richard M. Schlesinger lives a life of controversy -- and contrast.Here on Florida's Gold Coast, he lives among the moneyed elite -- Donald Trump, Rod Stewart and the Ford family -- behind the walls of a $13 million oceanfront mansion.
FEATURES
By Ross Peddicord | October 12, 1991
Butler -- It is mid-morning in the Western Run Valley, that horsey enclave northwest of the city.Victoria Schlesinger has been up since dawn, riding horses.Her name suggests someone with gentler pursuits, perhaps a poet or writer of romance novels instead of a woman jockey, one of few women who compete against a bunch of tough guys in the male-dominated sport of steeplechase racing.The hurly-burly riding tactics and athletic derring-do of the steeplechase professionals are notorious and inevitably lead to what the veteran riders call "wrecks."
FEATURES
By STEPHEN HUNTER and STEPHEN HUNTER,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 17, 1996
John Schlesinger broke the mold.The portly, pugnacious British film director, a recent visitor to Washington to plug his new film, has once again insisted on confounding critics and citizens alike, going his own way, smashing all precedent, and parting company absolutely with his peers and acolytes.And what mold is that?Why, it's the mold originally set by Alfred Hitchcock, and followed more or less intact by other great Brits, such as Sir Carol Reed, Sir David Lean, Tony Richards and later by another generation, including Ridley and Tony Scott, Michael Apted and so forth.
NEWS
By Michael James and Joe Nawrozki and Michael James and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2000
A federal judge has ordered former Baltimore County real estate baron Richard M. Schlesinger to pay $185,000 to the federal government for misusing housing funds that he was supposed to have spent on badly needed repairs and upkeep on his property. The ruling also paves the way for a trial in U.S. District Court in Baltimore in which prosecutors will try to collect up to $600,000 more in damages they say Schlesinger owes because of gross mismanagement at Riverdale Apartments in Essex. The development was left in such disrepair that county officials tore it down in 1998.
NEWS
April 27, 2009
On April 24, 2009, Steven Schlesinger Interment will be held in Israel, please omit flowers. In mourning at 2415 Sugarcone Road (Greengate). Baltimore, MD 21209 (Sunday and Monday at 7pm).
NEWS
By Kellie Woodhouse and Kellie Woodhouse,kellie.woodhouse@baltsun.com | March 1, 2009
In a pale yellow room in the Schlesinger home in Arnold, sunlight pours in through two long windows. Avery, 3, is running her neon-colored toy around the edge of the coffee table, making engine noises. Her pink-framed glasses are slipping down her nose, her short brown hair a mess of tangles. She seems unaware that everyone in the room is talking about her. Her father is sitting in an armchair, her mother sinking into an overstuffed couch next to a 23-year-old woman from Germany she met two days ago. In another room, Avery's brother and sister are watching a cartoon, and its sounds flitter in and out of the conversation.
NEWS
March 5, 2007
The American historian Arthur Schlesinger Jr., who died on Wednesday night, was the kind of public figure who is far more familiar in France and the United States than in Britain. He was a public intellectual, a class of person who came to prominence in the Enlightenment (to which both France and the U.S. owe so much), but who still remain relatively rare in this country, notwithstanding Stefan Collini's substantial recent argument to the contrary. Mr. Schlesinger not only contributed massively to his own field of study - presidential power - he also felt it natural and proper to play a fully engaged part with his own times.
NEWS
By Larry Williams and Larry Williams,Ideas Editor | March 4, 2007
For Americans of a certain age, the death last week of Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr. marked the passing of the last eloquent articulator of America's 20th-century liberal dream, following the departure last May of his good friend John Kenneth Galbraith, a like-minded economist. A distinguished scholar, Schlesinger painted vast portions of the nation's history with vivid award-winning portraits of populist leaders from Andrew Jackson to Franklin Delano Roosevelt to Robert F. Kennedy. In a post-World War II era when Americans were suspicious of liberals with Communist leanings, Schlesinger articulated a muscular anti-Communist version of liberalism as a founder of Americans for Democratic Action.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 19, 2006
Facing Sen. Joseph I. Lieberman's independent candidacy, Republican officials at the state and national level have made the extraordinary decision to abandon their official candidate, and some are actively working to help Lieberman win in November. Despite Lieberman's position that he would continue to caucus with Democrats if re-elected, all three Republican congressional candidates in Connecticut have praised Lieberman and have not endorsed the party's nominee, Alan Schlesinger. An independent group with Republican ties is raising money for Lieberman, who has been a strong supporter of President Bush on the Iraq war. Sen. John McCain, an Arizona Republican, although he has said he would support the Republican nominee, is not planning to campaign for him and allowed two of his aides to consult with the Lieberman camp before the Aug. 8 Democratic primary.
NEWS
December 8, 2004
On December 7, 2004 MARJORIETRUMBOWER of Eldersburg MD; devoted wife of the late William H. Trumbower; loving mother of Gwendolyn East and her husband Dennis, Sandra Lee Trumbower, Beth Jespersen and her husband Nils; cherished grandmother of Faith East, Sara Schlesinger, Kirsti Jespersen, Amber Schlesinger and the late Eirik Jespersen. Friends are invited to call Loring Byers Funeral Home Inc., 8728 Liberty Road, (2 miles west of beltway exit 18), on Thursday, December 9, 2004 at 1 P.M. Graveside Services will be held at 1:30 P.M., at Lake View Memorial Park.
NEWS
By Robert Timberg and Robert Timberg,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 26, 2004
WASHINGTON - The unexpectedly fierce hostilities that flared in Iraq soon after the fall of Saddam Hussein helped pave the way for the abuses at Abu Ghraib prison, with U.S. forces ill-equipped and undermanned to handle a growing insurgency and a burgeoning detainee population. That was one of the central themes to emerge from the report issued yesterday by an investigative team of three Army generals on the mistreatment of detainees at the infamous prison outside Baghdad. U.S. forces thought they would be operating in "a relatively non-hostile environment," the report says.
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