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By Boston Globe | March 18, 1994
BERLIN -- As a showing of the movie "Schindler's List" drew to a close the other night, the audience of high school pupils had this question:Why had no one ever told before about Oskar Schindler and his efforts to save the Jews from the Nazi Holocaust?"
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NEWS
November 4, 2008
On the web * A genealogy Web site is launching what it's billing as the world's largest online collection of Jewish family history records. Ancestry.com has partnered with two organizations for the project - JewishGen, an affiliate of New York's Museum of Jewish Heritage, and the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, an overseas humanitarian aid organization. The online collection, which was announced last week, features millions of historic Jewish records including Oskar Schindler's list - the names of almost 2,000 Jews saved by a German businessman who employed them.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | December 24, 1993
In 1981, the film critic of this newspaper wondered about a young director's apparent ignorance of the past as demonstrated in the glibly amusing "Raiders of the Lost Ark," with its cartoon Nazis: "The film, which is absolutely nailed into a certainIn 1981, the film critic of this newspaper wondered about a young director's apparent ignorance of the past as demonstrated in the glibly amusing "Raiders of the Lost Ark," with its cartoon Nazis: "The film, which...
NEWS
December 18, 2005
By any standard, Schindler's List is a terrific film. It's a moving account of Oskar Schindler's efforts to save Jews from Auschwitz by employing them in his factory. Critics have lauded it as the finest movie ever made about the Holocaust. The American Film Institute named it as one of the top 10 films of all time. But you won't find Montgomery County high school seniors watching it in class. That's because they can't. Schindler's List is rated R. And under a new policy, high schools can't show R-rated movies, nor can middle schools show any movie rated PG-13.
FEATURES
By Barry Koltnow and Barry Koltnow,Orange County Register | December 28, 1993
About 150 Holocaust survivors were brought together in Israel by Steven Spielberg on the next-to-last day of filming of the director's epic movie "Schindler's List."The survivors were gathered at a reception to meet the cast of the movie and to prepare for the next day's filming of a scene in which they would visit the actual grave of Oskar Schindler, the German industrialist who saved their lives nearly a half-century before.But the reunion atmosphere of the evening took a back seat to an interesting phenomenon, according to producer Gerald Molen.
FEATURES
March 22, 1994
Here is a complete list of Oscar winners announced yesterday:BEST PICTURE: "Schindler's List" (Universal)DIRECTOR: Steven Spielberg, "Schindler's List"ACTOR: Tom Hanks, "Philadelphia"ACTRESS: Holly Hunter, "The Piano"SUPPORTING ACTOR: Tommy Lee Jones, "The Fugitive"SUPPORTING ACTRESS: Anna Paquin, "The Piano"ART DIRECTION: "Schindler's List," art direction, Allan Starski; set decoration, Ewa BraunCINEMATOGRAPHY: Janusz Kaminski, "Schindler's List"COSTUME DESIGN:...
NEWS
November 4, 2008
On the web * A genealogy Web site is launching what it's billing as the world's largest online collection of Jewish family history records. Ancestry.com has partnered with two organizations for the project - JewishGen, an affiliate of New York's Museum of Jewish Heritage, and the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, an overseas humanitarian aid organization. The online collection, which was announced last week, features millions of historic Jewish records including Oskar Schindler's list - the names of almost 2,000 Jews saved by a German businessman who employed them.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 5, 2003
Ordinarily, Itzhak Perlman doesn't have a tough act to follow; the violinist is the main event. But on Tuesday night in the sanctuary at the Beth Tfiloh Congregation, Perlman, introduced as the "featured entertainer," had the unenviable task of following an hour-long tribute to Rabbi Mitchell Wohlberg, who was compared to Moses, assured of immortality, kidded about his strong New York accent, and saluted by one young admirer because "he's a cool man...
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | February 26, 1997
Down in fast-growing Southern Maryland, with its luxurious bedroom communities, you're talking affluent suburban lifestyle. You're talking new houses and new families. You're talking roads congested with Beamers and Mercedeses, Lexuses and Accuras. And those are just the high school students.And the high school students have cellular phones, see. But what's the point of having one if you can't use it? So there's a bill in the General Assembly to allow the use of cellular phones in students' cars on school grounds and, with a principal's permission, even in school buildings.
NEWS
March 27, 1994
It was really no surprise when Malaysia forbade distribution of the Oscar-winning film about the Holocaust, "Schindler's List," as being Jewish and anti-German propaganda. Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad has a long history of expression that he calls anti-Zionist but others find anti-Semitic.This is the same Mahathir Mohamad who, alone of Asian leaders, boycotted the Asian Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit in Seattle last November, hosted by President Clinton. He was protesting U.S. involvement in Asian matters.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 5, 2003
Ordinarily, Itzhak Perlman doesn't have a tough act to follow; the violinist is the main event. But on Tuesday night in the sanctuary at the Beth Tfiloh Congregation, Perlman, introduced as the "featured entertainer," had the unenviable task of following an hour-long tribute to Rabbi Mitchell Wohlberg, who was compared to Moses, assured of immortality, kidded about his strong New York accent, and saluted by one young admirer because "he's a cool man...
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 12, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Even as he was being honored last night at the Smithsonian Institution for his filmmaking and humanitarian efforts, Steven Spielberg reminded his audience that all the well-intentioned movies in the world are of little consequence when intolerance reigns and guns are readily available."
NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | November 18, 1998
YOU KNOW that old saying "you can't judge a book by its cover"? Well, maybe you can tell a politician by the films he or she likes.That was the premise behind a question posed to candidates for state and local offices this summer by The Sun's editorial board. We sent out a typical election-year questionnaire seeking candidate answers to public policy concerns. We also asked politicians to list their five favorite movies.The responses were hardly grist for editorial commentary. But it did show that Maryland pols seem to favor the same types of movies as their constituents.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | March 25, 1998
Usually an artist's art is more interesting than his life. That's not the case with Joseph Bau.Now having his first show in this country at the Jewish Community Center, Bau was born in Krakow, Poland, in 1920 and began to study art in 1938. The outbreak of World War II in 1939 interrupted his studies. He was confined to the Jewish ghetto in Krakow and was subsequently sent to the Plaszow and Gross-Rosen concentration camps. He had taken a course in Gothic printing, a style which the Nazis liked, and they employed him making charts.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt | December 21, 1997
MUCH PRAISE has been heaped on "Amistad," Debbie Allen and Steven Spielberg's new film based on the true story of a revolt by African captives aboard a 19th-century slave ship.But though the subject was compelling -- and the conditions aboard the slave ship chillingly rendered -- I felt oddly let down by the experience.Perhaps it was the prerelease hype, which suggested that "Amistad" would do for slavery what Spielberg's earlier film, "Schindler's List," had done for the Holocaust.Yet if one knew nothing else of American history, one might easily conclude that the events recounted in "Amistad" were merely the result of an unfortunate misunderstanding regarding immigration law.Aha!
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | March 2, 1997
Somewhere along the line a group of black folks decided we own February. Oh, don't try to deny it. Those of you reading this -- and I don't care what your ethnic group is -- have harbored the suspicion for a while now.It was confirmed to me last Monday, when a caller left a voice mail message that I paraphrase thusly:"I felt the showing of 'Schindler's List' with no commercial interruptions during Black History Month was 'insensitive.'"This is a minority opinion, I say to myself. Don't get upset.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | March 2, 1997
Somewhere along the line a group of black folks decided we own February. Oh, don't try to deny it. Those of you reading this -- and I don't care what your ethnic group is -- have harbored the suspicion for a while now.It was confirmed to me last Monday, when a caller left a voice mail message that I paraphrase thusly:"I felt the showing of 'Schindler's List' with no commercial interruptions during Black History Month was 'insensitive.'"This is a minority opinion, I say to myself. Don't get upset.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | March 25, 1998
Usually an artist's art is more interesting than his life. That's not the case with Joseph Bau.Now having his first show in this country at the Jewish Community Center, Bau was born in Krakow, Poland, in 1920 and began to study art in 1938. The outbreak of World War II in 1939 interrupted his studies. He was confined to the Jewish ghetto in Krakow and was subsequently sent to the Plaszow and Gross-Rosen concentration camps. He had taken a course in Gothic printing, a style which the Nazis liked, and they employed him making charts.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | February 26, 1997
Down in fast-growing Southern Maryland, with its luxurious bedroom communities, you're talking affluent suburban lifestyle. You're talking new houses and new families. You're talking roads congested with Beamers and Mercedeses, Lexuses and Accuras. And those are just the high school students.And the high school students have cellular phones, see. But what's the point of having one if you can't use it? So there's a bill in the General Assembly to allow the use of cellular phones in students' cars on school grounds and, with a principal's permission, even in school buildings.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN STAFF SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 23, 1997
This is a story about television history, a certain kind of hype and a movie being broadcast on television tonight almost for the first time and almost commercial-free.The story began last month at the Ritz-Carlton Huntington Hotel in Pasadena, Calif., where Warren Littlefield, president of NBC Entertainment, stood at a podium beneath a huge NBC peacock logo. He announced to an audience of reporters that NBC would make the first network broadcast of "Schindler's List," Steven Spielberg's 1993 Academy Award-winning film about the Holocaust, with Ford Motor Co. as the sole sponsor.
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