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Scherzo

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NEWS
July 1, 2004
On June 30, 2004, CHARLENE DALE(nee Dieter); devoted mother of Michael and John Scherzo, Jr.; dear grandmother of Karyssa Linn and John Scherzo, III; sister of Frank Dieter, Karen Primo, Debbie Dieter (Canapp) and the late Shirley Spinks and Dennis Dieter. Also survived by many friends and relatives. Visiting at the Lassahn Funeral Home, Inc., 7401 Belair Road, (Overlea) on Friday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Funeral Services will be Saturday at 9 A.M. Interment Oak Lawn Cemetery.
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NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 9, 2005
The musical performance scheduled for Thursday at the central library ought to appeal to anyone curious about the difference between a sonata and a scherzo -- as well as people who have never even heard the term scherzo. The Raphael Trio, made up of flutist Elaine Newhall, violinist Bruce Myers and cellist Fay Rosinsky, will lead the audience through a brief tour of classical music history, explaining the meanings of musical words as they go. "People go and hear music and there are all these words associated with it," Newhall said.
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FEATURES
By STEPHEN WIGLER | April 19, 1998
An important part of the beautiful performance of the Tchaikovsky Piano Concerto No. 1 given earlier this month by pianist Barry Douglas and the Baltimore Symphony was the lovely solos of the orchestra's associate principal flutist, Mark Sparks.Anyone who appreciated Sparks' playing on that occasion (or on many other occasions during his 10 years with the orchestra) will certainly enjoy his first solo album. It's called simply "Mark Sparks, Flute," and it should be available locally at larger CD stores.
NEWS
July 1, 2004
On June 30, 2004, CHARLENE DALE(nee Dieter); devoted mother of Michael and John Scherzo, Jr.; dear grandmother of Karyssa Linn and John Scherzo, III; sister of Frank Dieter, Karen Primo, Debbie Dieter (Canapp) and the late Shirley Spinks and Dennis Dieter. Also survived by many friends and relatives. Visiting at the Lassahn Funeral Home, Inc., 7401 Belair Road, (Overlea) on Friday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Funeral Services will be Saturday at 9 A.M. Interment Oak Lawn Cemetery.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 9, 2005
The musical performance scheduled for Thursday at the central library ought to appeal to anyone curious about the difference between a sonata and a scherzo -- as well as people who have never even heard the term scherzo. The Raphael Trio, made up of flutist Elaine Newhall, violinist Bruce Myers and cellist Fay Rosinsky, will lead the audience through a brief tour of classical music history, explaining the meanings of musical words as they go. "People go and hear music and there are all these words associated with it," Newhall said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | October 2, 1992
The sense of an ending is one of the most important things in the craft of music. One would hate to have to judge the place of Christopher Rouse alongside those of Sergei Rachmaninov and Max Bruch, whose compositions shared last night's Baltimore SymThe sense of an ending is one of the most important things in the craft of music. One would hate to have to judge the place of Christopher Rouse alongside those of Sergei Rachmaninov and Max Bruch, whose compositions shared last night's Baltimore Symphony program with Rouse's "Concerto per Corde."
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | February 15, 1993
As Evgeny Kissin gets older his style of playing may change and his repertory may expand beyond the Romantic works he now chooses to play. But, as his recital Saturday night at the Kennedy Center made clear, it is impossible to imagine that this 21-year-old Russian -- or anyone else, for that matter -- will ever play the music of Chopin better.Even the greatest Chopinists usually play one part of the composer's oeuvre more persuasively than others. Some are better with the "French" or "salon" Chopin (the nocturnes and waltzes)
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 15, 2004
Whenever Mario Venzago conducts the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, you can count on having a good time. This weekend's visit is no exception. At a cursory glance, the program may seem unexceptional - two overtures by Rossini serving as bookends for Mendelssohn's Violin Concerto and Schubert's Symphony No. 8, known as the Unfinished. Look more closely, and you'll discover something re-christened Schubert's Finished Symphony, an intriguing, conjectural completion of the beloved work that came down to us with only a first and second movement.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | April 20, 1994
Conductor Giuseppe Sinopoli gets right to the point."I am very interested in the way music expresses the tensions and conflicts in our society and in our lives," he says. "Music is not something isolated; there is always a cultural and psychological context."The 45-year-old Italian is something of an expert on the extra-musical matters about which he speaks. He received a medical degree in his native country more than 20 years ago and then completed the equivalent of a residence in psychiatry.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | July 25, 1991
Beethoven's Fourth Piano Concerto is filled with improvisational energy that tests the bounds of form. Last night in Meyerhoff Hall with the Baltimore Symphony and its music director, David Zinman, the pianist Vladimir Feltsman played the piece in a daringly improvisational way.For most of the first movement, however, the Russian-born pianist seemed lost in a maze of his own making: His opening sounded sleepy rather than meditative, his runs wooden rather...
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 15, 2004
Whenever Mario Venzago conducts the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, you can count on having a good time. This weekend's visit is no exception. At a cursory glance, the program may seem unexceptional - two overtures by Rossini serving as bookends for Mendelssohn's Violin Concerto and Schubert's Symphony No. 8, known as the Unfinished. Look more closely, and you'll discover something re-christened Schubert's Finished Symphony, an intriguing, conjectural completion of the beloved work that came down to us with only a first and second movement.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 9, 2001
The heartiest ovation at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall Friday evening was reserved for Mario Venzago, the Swiss conductor who wrapped up his second season as artistic director of Summer MusicFest with another typically enthusiastic presentation of another typically imaginative program. His musical gifts and personal charm have understandably earned him a strong following. Venzago's approach to this annual festival by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra combines substantive repertoire and entertainment value in roughly equal proportions.
FEATURES
By STEPHEN WIGLER | April 19, 1998
An important part of the beautiful performance of the Tchaikovsky Piano Concerto No. 1 given earlier this month by pianist Barry Douglas and the Baltimore Symphony was the lovely solos of the orchestra's associate principal flutist, Mark Sparks.Anyone who appreciated Sparks' playing on that occasion (or on many other occasions during his 10 years with the orchestra) will certainly enjoy his first solo album. It's called simply "Mark Sparks, Flute," and it should be available locally at larger CD stores.
FEATURES
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SUN STAFF | May 30, 1997
WASHINGTON -- On the whole, the Next Ice Age is greater than the sum of its parts.Some of the parts of Baltimore's unique ice-dancing company are very fine indeed. And it's quite a coup for the 9-year-old company to have a week's engagement at the Kennedy Center Opera House, accompanied by the house orchestra, and to showcase Olympic champion Dorothy Hamill as its guest artist.Now all it needs is a choreographer. (A lighting designer would help, too.) The two epic-length works on this program show that co-founder Nathan Birch, who created them, has a reach that far overshoots his grasp.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | January 14, 1995
That Jerzy Semkow is a much-underrated conductor was demonstrated last night in Meyerhoff Hall. The Polish-born conductor's reading of Brahms Symphony No. 4 in E Minor with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra was the finest performance of the piece this listener has heard the BSO give in the nine years he's been regularly attending its concerts.It was a taut performance that captured the dark side of the work without eschewing warmth. The first movement was driven with a powerful sense of destination.
NEWS
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | November 12, 1994
TOKYO -- Last night in Suntory Hall, the international arena in which the world's great orchestras perpetually battle, Baltimoreans could have been as proud of their symphony as they would be of the Orioles if they had just clinched the pennant.The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and music director David Zinman gave perhaps the greatest concert in their history together, surpassing even the fondly remembered performance in St. Petersburg that brought the orchestra's 1987 tour of Europe to a triumphant close.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | January 14, 1995
That Jerzy Semkow is a much-underrated conductor was demonstrated last night in Meyerhoff Hall. The Polish-born conductor's reading of Brahms Symphony No. 4 in E Minor with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra was the finest performance of the piece this listener has heard the BSO give in the nine years he's been regularly attending its concerts.It was a taut performance that captured the dark side of the work without eschewing warmth. The first movement was driven with a powerful sense of destination.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 9, 2001
The heartiest ovation at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall Friday evening was reserved for Mario Venzago, the Swiss conductor who wrapped up his second season as artistic director of Summer MusicFest with another typically enthusiastic presentation of another typically imaginative program. His musical gifts and personal charm have understandably earned him a strong following. Venzago's approach to this annual festival by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra combines substantive repertoire and entertainment value in roughly equal proportions.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | April 20, 1994
Conductor Giuseppe Sinopoli gets right to the point."I am very interested in the way music expresses the tensions and conflicts in our society and in our lives," he says. "Music is not something isolated; there is always a cultural and psychological context."The 45-year-old Italian is something of an expert on the extra-musical matters about which he speaks. He received a medical degree in his native country more than 20 years ago and then completed the equivalent of a residence in psychiatry.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | February 15, 1993
As Evgeny Kissin gets older his style of playing may change and his repertory may expand beyond the Romantic works he now chooses to play. But, as his recital Saturday night at the Kennedy Center made clear, it is impossible to imagine that this 21-year-old Russian -- or anyone else, for that matter -- will ever play the music of Chopin better.Even the greatest Chopinists usually play one part of the composer's oeuvre more persuasively than others. Some are better with the "French" or "salon" Chopin (the nocturnes and waltzes)
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