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By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff Writer | November 10, 1992
A 36-year-old West Baltimore man was sentenced yesterday to life plus 40 years in prison for slaying a Pepsi-Cola deliveryman during a robbery in July outside a grocery store.Samuel "Petey" Maith Jr. of the 1300 block of N. Carey St. pleaded guilty to first-degree murder, armed robbery and a handgun violation yesterday in Baltimore Circuit Court, said Gary Schenker, an assistant state's attorney.The charges stemmed from the July 2 robbery and slaying of 25-year-old Genro Fullano.Mr. Fullano, of Essex, was married and the father of a 4-month-old when he was robbed and shot once in the chest after making a late-morning delivery at the West Lanvale Street Market in the 1700 block of W. Lanvale St.In July, George N. Buntin Jr., executive director of the Baltimore NAACP chapter, cited the Fullano killing when he called for a discussion of martial law as a deterrent to violent crime in the city.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | October 31, 2009
Paul Schenker, a retired Baltimore surgeon who had been the oldest alumnus of the University of Maryland School of Medicine and City College, died Monday of heart failure at Sinai Hospital. He was 106. He was born in Baltimore, the son of Russian immigrants. His father was a tailor and his mother was a homemaker, and he was raised in the 1900 block of E. Pratt St. As a youngster, he sold newspapers on street corners. "He remembered selling newspapers the day the Titanic went down," said a daughter, Donna M. Shapiro of Pikesville.
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NEWS
October 30, 1990
A career criminal was sentenced yesterday in Baltimore Circuit Court to 170 years in prison, the first 30 years to be served without parole, for attempted murder and handgun charges that resulted from a shootout in which two police officers were injured."
NEWS
December 26, 2006
On Saturday, December 23, 2006, NORMAN L. SCHENKER of Rockville, MD; beloved husband of the late Marion Schenker; devoted father of Esther Schenker; cherished brother of Philip Schenker; loving uncle of Hal (Ronna) Schenker, Roz (Michael) Blum and Jamie (Brad) Foohey; dear great-uncle of five; Graveside Funeral Services will be held on Tuesday, December 26, 2006, 11 A.M. at Mt. Lebanon Cemetery, Adelphi, MD. Shiva will be observed at the home of Hal Schenker at 8208 Anita Road, Baltimore, MD 21208 on Tuesday and Wednesday.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff Writer | September 1, 1993
Kevin Brown followed his victim out of the grocery and along the East Baltimore sidewalk. He pulled a gun. He demanded money.He demanded exactly 4 cents.In Baltimore Circuit Court yesterday, Brown, 28, gave no explanation for his penny-ante robbery demand. He was content to plead guilty to armed robbery in return for a suspended, five-year sentence and three years of probation, according to prosecutor Gary Schenker."He got a suspended sentence?" the victim, Earl Williams, asked when reached at home yesterday.
NEWS
By Raymond L. Sanchez and Raymond L. Sanchez,Evening Sun Staff | January 15, 1991
A Baltimore woman has been returned to a state hospital for the criminally insane after admitting that she kidnapped a 7-year-old girl from Johns Hopkins Hospital last summer.Baltimore Circuit Judge Hilary D. Caplan yesterday ordered Karen Flannagan, 28, back to Clifton T. Perkins Hospital Center, where she has been undergoing treatment since her arrest. Flannagan was sent back to Perkins after a team of doctors determined that she had a mental disorder and was a substance abuser when she abducted the child.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Staff Writer | August 23, 1995
When justice finally was done for John Doe, no family members came to the courtroom to see his killer sentenced to eight years in prison. No one stood to tell Judge Elsbeth L. Bothe yesterday how they grieved for the young man who died from two stab wounds to the chest, surrounded by about 15 adversaries on a South Baltimore street.That's because two years after his death, no one has been able to figure out the name of the man who died that night. Not even Brian K. Abrams, 25, who yesterday pleaded guilty to manslaughter with the victim's knife.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | January 25, 1997
Leon Noel was found guilty of the Pigtown "52-cent murder" last night by a jury in Baltimore Circuit Court.The victim's husband, Stephen Cooke, said the verdict was "exactly what we wanted" and expressed hope that Judge John Carroll Byrnes would sentence Noel, 23, of Southwest Baltimore to life without parole. Cooke, 47, was with his wife, Denise, 44, when she was shot near their home during a robbery in August 1995.In emotional closing arguments, Noel's lawyer, public defender Maureen Glancy compared the Pigtown case to the Salem witch trials and suggested that Noel was singled out as a scapegoat when "community hysteria" set in after the slaying.
NEWS
By Raymond L. Sanchez and Raymond L. Sanchez,Evening Sun Staff | April 16, 1991
A 26-year-old gospel singer was sentenced today to life plus 20 years in prison for what a judge called the "ruthless and callous" murder of furniture store executive Aaron S. Levenson during a botched robbery on Oct. 4.Before sentencing, Jeffrey Lloyd Johnson, who pleaded guilty March 5 to first-degree felony murder, attempted armed robbery and a handgun violation, expressed his regret to Baltimore Circuit Judge Joseph I. Pines."
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | September 11, 1993
Unusual, bizarre, tragic -- three little words to describe the case of one Michael Williams, who had the misfortune of being pulled from the relative peace of his prison cell to the courtroom of Baltimore Circuit Judge Kenneth L. Johnson on Oct. 16, 1992.Those are adjectives the Maryland Court of Special Appeals used recently -- in a heretofore unreported opinion -- to describe what happened to this fellow Williams who, as you will see, was in the wrong place at the wrong time, waving his finger in the air."
NEWS
April 10, 2005
On Thursday, April 7, 2005, LUCILLE SCHENKER (nee Roth); loving wife of the late Jack Schenker; beloved mother of Gary and Stevenn Schenker, both of Baltimore, MD; devoted mother-in-law of Wendy and Stacey Schenker; beloved sister of Norma and Fred Gross of Silver Spring, MD; loving grandmother of Alexandra, Victoria, Julia, and Robbie. Services at SOL LEVINSON and BROS., INC., 8900 Reisterstown Road at Mt. Wilson Lane, on Monday, April 11 at 10 A.M. Interment Beth Tfiolh Congregation Cemetery - 5800 Windsor Mill Road.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | April 20, 1997
Thank you, Leon Yukem Noel. Thank you. Sometimes the most eloquent argument for a particular belief comes from the most unexpected places. And this past Wednesday, Noel gave a chilling example of why violent criminals with a history of violence should be tossed behind bars and the doors welded shut.If you didn't get to read Sun reporter Brenda Buote's article in the April 17 issue about Noel's exhilarating performance in front of Judge John Carroll Byrnes, I will inform you. First, let's be clear who Noel is, so that we don't overlook the most important people in this matter: the family and loved ones of the woman he was convicted of murdering for 52 cents.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | January 25, 1997
Leon Noel was found guilty of the Pigtown "52-cent murder" last night by a jury in Baltimore Circuit Court.The victim's husband, Stephen Cooke, said the verdict was "exactly what we wanted" and expressed hope that Judge John Carroll Byrnes would sentence Noel, 23, of Southwest Baltimore to life without parole. Cooke, 47, was with his wife, Denise, 44, when she was shot near their home during a robbery in August 1995.In emotional closing arguments, Noel's lawyer, public defender Maureen Glancy compared the Pigtown case to the Salem witch trials and suggested that Noel was singled out as a scapegoat when "community hysteria" set in after the slaying.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Staff Writer | August 23, 1995
When justice finally was done for John Doe, no family members came to the courtroom to see his killer sentenced to eight years in prison. No one stood to tell Judge Elsbeth L. Bothe yesterday how they grieved for the young man who died from two stab wounds to the chest, surrounded by about 15 adversaries on a South Baltimore street.That's because two years after his death, no one has been able to figure out the name of the man who died that night. Not even Brian K. Abrams, 25, who yesterday pleaded guilty to manslaughter with the victim's knife.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | September 11, 1993
Unusual, bizarre, tragic -- three little words to describe the case of one Michael Williams, who had the misfortune of being pulled from the relative peace of his prison cell to the courtroom of Baltimore Circuit Judge Kenneth L. Johnson on Oct. 16, 1992.Those are adjectives the Maryland Court of Special Appeals used recently -- in a heretofore unreported opinion -- to describe what happened to this fellow Williams who, as you will see, was in the wrong place at the wrong time, waving his finger in the air."
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | April 20, 1997
Thank you, Leon Yukem Noel. Thank you. Sometimes the most eloquent argument for a particular belief comes from the most unexpected places. And this past Wednesday, Noel gave a chilling example of why violent criminals with a history of violence should be tossed behind bars and the doors welded shut.If you didn't get to read Sun reporter Brenda Buote's article in the April 17 issue about Noel's exhilarating performance in front of Judge John Carroll Byrnes, I will inform you. First, let's be clear who Noel is, so that we don't overlook the most important people in this matter: the family and loved ones of the woman he was convicted of murdering for 52 cents.
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