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NEWS
February 22, 1992
Andrew Schenck was well known in this area during the 1970s. He was the young associate conductor of the Baltimore Symphony with the flying blond hair who conducted many pops, children's and run-out concerts. Then he moved away, as assistant and associate conductors are wont to do.Mr. Schenck moved back a few years ago and lived quietly, barely visible in Baltimore's musical life, but flying out to conduct in such places as New Zealand and Slovenia. Suddenly, after recordings made with London and New Zealand orchestras, Mr. Schenck was leading a worldwide revival of the American composer Samuel Barber.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2000
Whether visiting members of Congress or a country parish, the Rev. Rob Schenck utters the same familiar words and presents a gift that he wants prominently displayed. The pastor, who calls himself a missionary to the nation's capital, delivers a message on the Ten Commandments. He leaves his audience with a sculpted stone tablet imprinted with them -- and asks that the inscription be displayed and obeyed. "I always tell them the latter part is the toughest," the evangelical minister said.
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FEATURES
February 25, 1992
A memorial service for conductor Andrew Schenck, originally scheduled for 2 p.m. Saturday, has been rescheduled by his family for 4 p.m. that day at the Church of Redeemer, 5603 N. Charles St.An annual scholarship in his name has been established at Tanglewood, the summer home and school of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Contributions may be sent to the Andrew Schenck Memorial Fund in care of Robin Yorks, Boston Symphony, Symphony Hall, Boston, Mass. 02115.
NEWS
By Sherry Graham and Sherry Graham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 21, 2000
"THE TEN WORDS that Will Change a Nation" will be the subject of a presentation by the Rev. Rob Schenck at 6 p.m. April 8 and 9 at St. Stephen's Reformed Episcopal Church. Schenck is a missionary to Washington, D.C., where he directs Operation Save Our Nation, an effort to bring Christian Scriptures to bear on the minds and hearts of those making public policy in our country. He also volunteers as general secretary to the National Clergy Council, a network of pastors and denominational leaders who strive to affect debate on national policy.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | February 21, 1992
ANDREW SCHENCK, a Baltimore-based conductor on the verge of a major international career, died late Wednesday night of cancer. Schenck, who had been associate conductor of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra from 1973 to 1980, was 52 years old.After years of guest-conducting throughout the world, often with relatively obscure orchestras in the United States, Europe and Asia, Schenck seemed to have made a major breakthrough: Last October he spent a week conducting...
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | February 26, 1993
When the late Andrew Schenck won a Grammy Wednesday night, it was typical that scarcely anyone noticed his name.Schenck, who died of cancer a year ago, won for his world premiere recording on the Koch label of Samuel Barber's "The Lovers." The prize was awarded for Contemporary Composition. Good as it is and deserving as it is, however, "The Lovers" is hardly a new work. That anyone knows about it -- that it got recorded at all -- is what Schenck was all about."The Lovers" was written 23 years ago and Barber, by that point, had been written off by most of the classical music establishment.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | September 16, 1990
Herbert Davis Associates, a 10-year-old real estate firm based in Brooklandville, recently became a partnership between Lois Schenck and Herbert Davis.Ms. Schenck and Mr. Davis first became associated in 1973, when Mr. Davis headed a firm then known as Chase, Fitzgerald, Davis and Roland.Ms. Schenck moved to New York and operated Lois Schenck Real Estate in New York City from 1982 to 1988. She sold that company before returning to Baltimore.Ms. Schenck is married to symphony conductor Andrew Schenck, music director of the Nassau Symphony and the Atlantic Sinfnietta in New York.
FEATURES
By Henry Scarupa | April 28, 1991
Call it a love affair with a city.How else describe the affection that Andrew and Lois Schenck have for Baltimore, the place they have adopted as their hometown?Mr. Schenck, music director of the Nassau Symphony Orchestra on Long Island with recording and conducting engagements on both sides of the Atlantic and Pacific, could have chosen any number of places in which to live.But he and his wife, now a partner in the real estate firm of Herbert Davis Associates, decided not long ago to "come home."
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | October 27, 1998
The street glowed with the light of hundreds of candles that spring evening, and the speech delivered by a man with a bullhorn was strong stuff, words to arouse the righteousness of a crowd massed in front of a women's clinic. Mass murder was going on in there, he said. Mass murder of the sort carried out by the Nazis.The women's clinic, this nondescript building in suburban Buffalo, N.Y., this place where abortions were then performed, was being likened to the death factories of Dachau, Auschwitz, Buchenwald.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,Staff writer | November 28, 1991
A county police detective used grocery store register tapes to trackdown a woman who police say allegedly broke into homes and stole blank checks that she cashed at area stores.Rebecca Kathleen Cooper,33, of the 1500 block of Pine Whiff Avenue in Edgewater, was chargedwith seven counts of breaking and entering and theft charges, policesaid.Det. William Schenck, of the Southern District Station, said Cooper had allegedly broken into seven homes in the Edgewater area from July 19 to Oct. 28. Only checkbooks and grocery store check-cashing cards that would allow her to cash the checks at either Giant or Safeway were taken, he said.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | October 27, 1998
The street glowed with the light of hundreds of candles that spring evening, and the speech delivered by a man with a bullhorn was strong stuff, words to arouse the righteousness of a crowd massed in front of a women's clinic. Mass murder was going on in there, he said. Mass murder of the sort carried out by the Nazis.The women's clinic, this nondescript building in suburban Buffalo, N.Y., this place where abortions were then performed, was being likened to the death factories of Dachau, Auschwitz, Buchenwald.
BUSINESS
By Janice D'Arcy and Janice D'Arcy,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | March 23, 1997
Lois Schenck and Tod Myers crave tranquillity. As real estate agents, they lead frantic computer, phone, fax-filled lives; and they live in downtown Baltimore, where there isn't much peace and quiet. But tucked in the corner of Bolton Hill, they have created a home that is nothing if not serene.For Myers, it has been 20 years in the making, a slow, sometimes torturous renovation project. He moved into the 110-year old Edwardian townhouse in 1976. It originally had been built as a private dwelling, but during World War II it was divided into six tiny apartments to house shipyard workers.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | November 6, 1993
The state Department of Economic and Employment Development told the board of the National Information Technology Center yesterday that if the quasi-public agency isn't on track by the time the General Assembly convenes in January, the state will pull the plug.Mitchell Horowitz, technology adviser to DEED Secretary Mark Wasserman, delivered the message to a well-attended board meeting at the center's headquarters in Rockville. The board had gathered to chart a new course after a staff purge last month that left the NITC with only one employee.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | February 26, 1993
When the late Andrew Schenck won a Grammy Wednesday night, it was typical that scarcely anyone noticed his name.Schenck, who died of cancer a year ago, won for his world premiere recording on the Koch label of Samuel Barber's "The Lovers." The prize was awarded for Contemporary Composition. Good as it is and deserving as it is, however, "The Lovers" is hardly a new work. That anyone knows about it -- that it got recorded at all -- is what Schenck was all about."The Lovers" was written 23 years ago and Barber, by that point, had been written off by most of the classical music establishment.
NEWS
July 16, 1992
NEW YORK -- A federal judge yesterday ordered the arrest of six members of the anti-abortion group Operation Rescue to face contempt charges for thrusting a fetus at Bill Clinton and for blockading abortion clinics.Among those to be arrested are Randall Terry, founder of Operation Rescue, and Keith Tucci, its executive. No representatives from Operation Rescue appeared at the hearing before U.S. District Judge Robert Ward in Manhattan.Other defendants are Harley Belew, who tried to give the Democratic presidential candidate a fetus in a plastic container Tuesday; Patrick Mahoney; Joseph Foreman, who is also a member of Missionaries to the Pre-Born and Youth for America; and Robert Schenck.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch | May 3, 1992
AMHERST, N.Y. -- Foes in the abortion battle stand face to face, jammed between the barricades with nowhere to run, close enough to feel the gusts of each other's breath.Through the morning and into the afternoon Friday, they are stuck with each other on a muddy path outside an abortion clinic. Trench warfare."If you had an open mind, you would read this," says anti-abortion activist Gary Jelich of New York City, trying to hand a pamphlet to a young bespectacled woman who supports abortion rights.
NEWS
July 16, 1992
NEW YORK -- A federal judge yesterday ordered the arrest of six members of the anti-abortion group Operation Rescue to face contempt charges for thrusting a fetus at Bill Clinton and for blockading abortion clinics.Among those to be arrested are Randall Terry, founder of Operation Rescue, and Keith Tucci, its executive. No representatives from Operation Rescue appeared at the hearing before U.S. District Judge Robert Ward in Manhattan.Other defendants are Harley Belew, who tried to give the Democratic presidential candidate a fetus in a plastic container Tuesday; Patrick Mahoney; Joseph Foreman, who is also a member of Missionaries to the Pre-Born and Youth for America; and Robert Schenck.
FEATURES
February 25, 1992
A memorial service for conductor Andrew Schenck, originally scheduled for 2 p.m. Saturday, has been rescheduled by his family for 4 p.m. that day at the Church of Redeemer, 5603 N. Charles St.An annual scholarship in his name has been established at Tanglewood, the summer home and school of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Contributions may be sent to the Andrew Schenck Memorial Fund in care of Robin Yorks, Boston Symphony, Symphony Hall, Boston, Mass. 02115.
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