Advertisement
HomeCollectionsScheme
IN THE NEWS

Scheme

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 27, 2012
I would like to ask Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake to please don't insult our intelligence by telling citizens that the purpose of speed cameras is school safety ("Goal is 'zero' speed errors: Mayor's vow comes as camera criticism rises," Nov. 20). Baltimore's very loose interpretation of the state regulation regarding what is considered a "school area" has led to the placement of cameras all around the city in locations that have no bearing on ensuring that students arrive at school safely.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
A Morgan State University professor was sentenced Friday to three years in prison and will pay $105,726 in restitution in connection with a scheme to defraud the National Science Foundation and his students, according to the U.S. attorney's office. Manoj Kumar Jha, 47, of Severn, was convicted in April of wire fraud, mail fraud, falsification of records and theft of government property. Jha fraudulently obtained $200,000 in grants from the National Science Foundation and used it for personal expenses, the U.S. attorney's office said.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 21, 2009
Two business partners who misused money intended for building new homes in Baltimore County were sentenced Friday to eight years in prison, with five of those years suspended, the state attorney general's office said. Walter Osborne Ely Jr., 46, and sister Kimberly Zahrey, 44, were also ordered to pay $188,768 to 19 victims after they get out. The state is pursuing a separate civil case against the siblings to try to get more money back. The state said the two, operating as JAE Developers, took payments as large as $50,000 from clients and spent the money on expenses with no connection to the buyers' homes.
SPORTS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
A former high-ranking Maryland Department of Veterans Affairs official pleaded guilty to extortion Monday in federal court after falsely claiming about $1.4 million in government benefits over a 16-year period. David Clark, a 67-year-old Hydes resident, admitted fabricating documents and claims to secure federal benefits and state tax waivers for himself and at least 17 other veterans. He acknowledged making up records in his role as the deputy chief of claims for the state agency, including fake doctors' letters saying that claimants suffered from diabetes and documents listing false tours of Vietnam and awards such as Purple Hearts from 1995 until his retirement in 2011.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | January 30, 2013
Personal representatives of estates watch out! The Maryland comptroller is warning that a business calling itself IRFS in Annapolis is claiming to be collecting debts on behalf of the state. The business is sending out notices to personal representatives, saying the estate is delinquent on taxes. The comptroller said the business asks for unpaid taxes and interest, plus it sends a payment coupon for the alleged tax liability. Not only that, the notice tells representatives to take out a loan to pay off the debt or otherwise face a lien on the bank account or a garnishment of wages.
SPORTS
November 24, 2010
Two Maryland seafood dealers and the largest fish wholesaler in Washington will have to pay fines and restitution of nearly $890,000 for their part in what prosecutors and a federal judge have labeled the largest commercial fish poaching scheme in the history of the Chesapeake Bay. U.S. District Judge Peter Messitte sentenced OceanPro Industries Ltd., also known as Profish, to pay $575,000 in fines for buying tens of thousands of pounds of fish...
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | February 22, 2010
A Maryland businessman pleaded guilty Monday in federal court to a financial scheme that defrauded two Baltimore banks out of millions, ruined his check-cashing company and contributed to his older brother's suicide. Brian I. Satisky, 56, faces up to 30 years in prison at his sentencing and a $1 million fine for his role, which involved writing bad checks to various banks to falsely inflate the account balances. Prosecutors also plan to ask that he pay restitution to the banks he defrauded: $1.8 million to Carrollton Bank and $10.6 million to Baltimore County Savings Bank.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston | November 10, 2011
The Ravens two losses this season came against the Titans and Jaguars, both teams which play at 4-3 defense. Traditionally, the Ravens have struggled against the Colts and Bengals, both of which play the 4-3 scheme.  In the next two weeks, the Ravens play Seattle and the Bengals, so they'll be going against the 4-3 again. Ravens head coach John Harbaugh said the team has looked over previous game plans and might make some changes to see if they can be more successful. One area of concern has been the Ravens lack of ability to get to and block the middle linebacker.
BUSINESS
By Larry Carson | larry.carson@baltsun.com | December 16, 2009
Two Owings Mills-based mortgage firms accused of running a "foreclosure rescue scheme" have agreed to pay $110,000 in cash restitution as part of a settlement that saved the Ellicott City homes of two elderly women, one of whom has since died after becoming a victim. Poor health and related bills left the two women behind on mortgage payments in 2006, when they responded to a refinancing offer contained in packets labeled "Your Best Hope has just arrived." But instead of a promised rescue from the brink of foreclosure, the women found that they had unwittingly signed away the titles to their homes and were facing eviction.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | October 4, 2012
So many times on Consuming Interests we warn you about some fake letter or email being sent out from what appears to be a legitimate source. This latest one is real. Maryland's Consumer Protection Division has sent out letters to some residents, telling them they will be getting a refund after being duped by a Las Vegas company two years ago. That company, National Awards Service Advisory, sent out mass mailing to residents here, telling them to send in a $20 fee to claim their cash prize worth up to $3.4 million.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
The founder of a Baltimore County insurance company was arrested Wednesday in connection with an alleged scheme to make it appear that the firm - now being liquidated by a Delaware court - had millions of dollars in cash it did not actually possess. Jeffrey Cohen, 39, former CEO of nightclub and bar insurer Indemnity Insurance Corp., was indicted by a federal grand jury Tuesday on charges of making false statements to an insurance regulator. The indictment was unsealed Wednesday as government agents raided his house in Reisterstown.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
The mood and composition of the Ravens' offensive line have undergone major changes after a frustrating season. Pass rushers often invaded the pocket last year, either knocking quarterback Joe Flacco to the ground or harassing him into rushed throws as he threw a franchise-record 22 interceptions. The running game was stonewalled much of the season. The Ravens averaged just 3.1 yards per carry as running back Ray Rice struggled with injuries and rarely had holes to run through.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
A Morgan State University professor was convicted Tuesday in connection with a scheme to defraud the National Science Foundation and his students. Manoj Kumar Jha, 46, of Severn faces 20 years in prison for each of four counts of wire fraud, and for one count each of mail fraud and falsification of records; and a maximum sentence of 10 years in prison for theft of government property, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office. He is scheduled to be sentenced in July. Jha, who was director of the university's Center for Advanced Transportation and Infrastructure Engineering Research, was accused of fraudulently obtaining $200,000 in grant funds from the NSF's Small Business Technology Transfer program in 2008 and 2009, and attempting to obtain another $500,000 through the same program.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2014
The U.S. Department of Justice has identified and begun targeting a broad conspiracy to fix prices on automobile shipments in and out of Baltimore and other U.S. ports, with a Chilean company recently pleading guilty to violating federal antitrust laws in the scheme. Justice officials reached a felony plea agreement with Valparaiso, Chile-based Compania Sud Americana de Vapores (CSAV), according to documents filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore. They called it the first charge to land in a continuing antitrust investigation into companies colluding to push up shipping prices.
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | March 5, 2014
Howard County police are investigating multiple cases of telephone fraud, where the caller poses as an agent from the Internal Revenue Service or federal government, police said in a news release Wednesday. Police said nine cases involving county residents have been reported since October 2013, with occurrences increasing during the start of tax season. Police said in some cases, scammers have received victims' Social Security numbers and monetary amounts between $2,000 and $3,000.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
Part 1: Trouble wears cheaters   Part 2: Perfidious Albion   Part 3: The hotsy-totsy lexicographer   Part 4: The test Kory Stamper listened to what Turner had told me and frowned. She went to the door and shouted into the Scriptorium: “Sokolowski, get over here! That gumshoe from Baltimore thinks he's on to something.” A shudder swept through the room, as if someone had set off a cherry bomb among Trappists, and Peter Sokolowski scuttled over, worry as plain on him on him as the gin blossoms on a publisher's nose.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2011
Michael Lee Cross pleaded guilty Friday to taking kickbacks from a Rosedale auto repair company, making him the third Baltimore police officer to be convicted in an extortion scheme that could involve more than 50 city officers, according to new documents filed in federal court. So far, 17 officers have been arrested and suspended without pay, and 14 others have been put on desk duty while the investigation continues. But new charges filed this week against the owners of Majestic Auto Repair allege that many more officers were part of the scheme, in which officers are accused of steering motorists involved in accidents to the tow company in exchange for cash.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | September 22, 2011
As the new running back on the block, Ricky Williams understands his role, which is to complement starter Ray Rice and bring a bruising style to the Ravens' rushing attack. For Williams who joined the team on Aug. 9 after eight seasons with the Miami Dolphins, transitioning to the Ravens has been a gradual process. “The run scheme is different from anything I've ever played in before,” Williams said without delving into specifics. “It's just about getting familiar. A lot of the things that have been built over the last three years that guys like [quarterback]
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2014
The Northern Virginia couple throwing down $100 tokens at Maryland Live casino last month may have looked like aspiring high-rollers, but police say they were gambling with fake chips. Maryland State Police have charged a husband and wife from Annandale, Va., with conspiracy and theft after determining that they were using counterfeit chips at the Hanover casino. Authorities are looking for two other suspects in a similar, but unrelated, case. According to police, Rosa A. Nguyen, 36, purchased $150,000 worth of counterfeit casino chips — which had been altered to appear to be Maryland Live chips — over the Internet for $12,000.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.