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Scenic Roads

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NEWS
May 30, 1991
Baltimore area motorists who limit their travels to interstate arteries are doing themselves a great disservice. They are depriving themselves of moments of beauty and reflection which are at least as important to human fulfillment as being able to keep up with busy schedules.One of Baltimore's delights is that so much relatively pastoral land and serene scenery remains close to the hustle and bustle of the urbanized centers. A drive along Falls Road reminds us of that. So do travels along many other county side roads, which are full of surprising links to different, less hurried times.
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NEWS
By Michelle Deal Zimmerman and Michelle Deal Zimmerman,Michelle.deal@baltsun.com | October 17, 2009
The Federal Highway Administration on Friday designated four Maryland routes as America's Byways, placing them among the top driving tours in the nation. "The journey is the destination along these nationally designated Scenic Byways that provide an authentic Maryland experience," Transportation Secretary Beverley K. Swaim-Staley said in a news release. The National Scenic Byways Program was created in 1991 to identify roads with unique archaeological, cultural, historical, natural, recreational and scenic qualities.
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NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Sun Staff Writer | June 5, 1994
The vistas seen during a "drive in the country" would have some legal protection under legislation set to be introduced tomorrow in the County Council.The Scenic Roads Act, proposed by County Executive Charles I. Ecker, would designate 60 county roads for protection by changing regulations for new subdivisions and county public works projects.The legislation would help release developers from some of the requirements they now face, such as widening and straightening roads that front their subdivisions, to preserve the roads' scenic qualities, said Marsha McLaughlin, deputy director of planning and zoning.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | October 12, 2009
It was one week ago when my colleague, Baltimore Sun Business Editor Tim Wheatley, was killed in a crash with a United Parcel Service truck at the intersection of York and Corbett roads in northern Baltimore County. In an instant a vital, healthy man of 48 with a wife, three children and the deep respect of his professional colleagues became a statistic to be entered into a national database. The next day I traveled to that intersection to try to find what answers, if any, could be gleaned from visiting the site and driving the roads and putting myself in the position of Tim and the UPS driver as they approached the point of collision.
NEWS
By Elise Armacost and Elise Armacost,Staff writer | October 9, 1991
The County Council, which has done its share of arguing during the last year, found something new to bicker about Monday: a simple resolution to create a scenic roads committee.The resolution -- the kind of measure that usually passes without comment -- was quietly introduced, discussed and approved by all eight council members last month, near the end of a meeting that concluded about 11:30 p.m.Figuring that everyone who had something to say about the resolution had said it, Council Chairwoman Virginia P. Clagett, D-West River, who sponsored the measure, began composing the panel.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Sun Staff Writer | July 5, 1994
The County Council is expected tonight to preserve the rural nature of 60 county thoroughfares by designating them as scenic roads.The scenic designation would mean that the roads could not be widened or straightened, except for safety reasons.At a June 20 hearing on the bill, farmers and school officials expressed concern that scenic vistas might come at the expense of safety.In particular, farmers feared that motorists might bear down upon them from behind sharp curves and steep hills, and school officials worried that roads and bridges might not be wide enough to accommodate school buses.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer | July 6, 1994
The County Council voted unanimously last night to designate as scenic 60 rural roads in the county, adopting a measure that will restrict altering the roads for virtually any purpose but to improve safety."
NEWS
By PATRICK GILBERT and PATRICK GILBERT,SUN STAFF | October 10, 1995
October brings renewed interest in Baltimore County's scenic roads -- through rolling fields and autumn-tinted woodlands, between tree-lined hedgerows, past streams rushing through gorges -- but apparently not in legislation to preserve theirbucolic charm.No one showed up for a public hearing last week on the proposal that would exempt designated scenic roads from strict road design standards. Rural roads designated in the county master plan, a guide to land use, as scenic corridors would be affected.
NEWS
By Sarah Lesher and Sarah Lesher,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2004
Software for military intelligence has been put to use to keep an eye on the state of Anne Arundel County's scenic and historic roads. The software, called Media Mapper, is a state-of-the-art precision tool developed to help not only the military, but also in the management of large farms. Media Mapper allows wide-angle video "windshield views" of roads and audio commentary to be linked by global positioning system, or GPS, coordinates to maps and other geographic data. Anne Arundel's Scenic and Historic Roads Program is the only one in the country to put such high-tech power to work for historic preservation, according to Sherri Marsh, an agricultural and historical planner in the county's Office of Environmental and Cultural Resources.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1997
Turn right past the Bay 50 shopping center on U.S. 50 in Anne Arundel County and the clatter of trucks fades into the silence of a growing community's struggle with its past.Whitehall Road runs from a Sunoco gas station into fields scarlet with fall, beneath skies alive with geese, past horse farms to the Colonial mansion of Maryland's last British governor.Next spring a developer wants to build 134 homes in a meadow believed to have held Gov. Horatio Sharpe's slave quarters, over the protests of neighbors who say this will ruin the road's historic character.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,Sun reporter | December 16, 2007
They were, officially, roads that offered some of the most beautiful views in Maryland, meandering past farms, woodlands and historic buildings. Signs painted with black-eyed Susans marked them as "Scenic Byways" - part of a state program to boost tourism and preserve the character of rural roads. But earlier this year, those signs came down. State highways officials have removed 250 miles of road from the list of scenic byways.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,Sun Reporter | January 20, 2007
Motorists on Tufton Avenue come upon horses and pastures, and wide views of hillside and sky. Closer to the road are the memorials. Two shrines honor three teenagers who were killed in crashes about a half-mile apart. One of those occurred on the same curve where three other people have died in the past two years. "It's a beautiful ride during the day - the horse farms, the views. It's gorgeous," said Neil Goldberg, whose 18-year-old son died in August in Tufton Avenue's most recent fatal accident.
NEWS
By Sarah Lesher and Sarah Lesher,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2004
Software for military intelligence has been put to use to keep an eye on the state of Anne Arundel County's scenic and historic roads. The software, called Media Mapper, is a state-of-the-art precision tool developed to help not only the military, but also in the management of large farms. Media Mapper allows wide-angle video "windshield views" of roads and audio commentary to be linked by global positioning system, or GPS, coordinates to maps and other geographic data. Anne Arundel's Scenic and Historic Roads Program is the only one in the country to put such high-tech power to work for historic preservation, according to Sherri Marsh, an agricultural and historical planner in the county's Office of Environmental and Cultural Resources.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | August 25, 2002
As it winds up out of Ellicott City, College Avenue is one of Howard County's most scenic roads and also is one of the most dangerous. Along the way are a series of tight blind curves, followed by a succession of hills, the steepest of which resembles a roller-coaster, as drivers climb one side unable to see the next dip until they crest the hill to drive down. If drivers choose to push the speed limit (posted at 25 mph), they can feel the drops in their stomachs. With enough speed, they can launch their cars into the air. Teen-age drivers love the curves and seven sharp rises between New Cut Road and Bonnie Branch Road.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2000
Howard County residents, be forewarned: More growth is on its way. In coming years, roads will become more crowded. Farmland and woodland will succumb to housing developments. The "rural west" will become increasingly suburban. The quality of life -- as many people define it -- will decline. It's all laid out in the latest draft of the 2000 General Plan, the document that will guide the county's growth through the next 20 years. The County Council will hold a hearing on the plan tomorrow night and is scheduled to vote on it Oct. 2. No matter how much residents complain about their property values going down, the fact remains that land-use patterns in Howard County are largely set. The population is expected to grow by 20 percent in the next 20 years.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2000
Lester W. Horn led a honking parade of antique cars down Ellicott City's Main Street yesterday to help the State Highway Administration drive home a point about roads. Hoping to draw attention to and protect historic routes, the agency - using downtown Ellicott City as a backdrop - unveiled plans to showcase 31 scenic byways in Maryland. Included in the group is Main Street, a small section of the National Road, America's first highway to the west. Starting in Baltimore and ending in Illinois, the approximately 600-mile route was built in the early 19th century and is known as Route 144 through Howard County.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | November 4, 1997
The scenic drive through the countryside is becoming an endangered species of entertainment in rapidly developing Anne Arundel County.But County Council Chairwoman Diane R. Evans is proposing changes to local zoning laws to prevent it from becoming extinct.The Arnold Republican introduced a resolution in the council last night suggesting that the county preserve 32 "scenic and historic roads" by requiring landowners to maintain trees and meadows along their edges.The administration of County Executive John G. Gary supports a study of whether the concept can be woven into the county's land-use laws without preventing improvements to roads to ease traffic congestion, county officials said.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | August 19, 1996
A Howard County law designed to protect about 60 scenic roads does not do enough to keep them safe from development, say Ellicott City residents engaged in a battle to save one of their own scenic roads.The fight involves College Avenue, an almost two-mile-long, narrow, winding road with a forested vista of decades-old locust and oak trees.One of about a dozen designated scenic roads in Ellicott City, it begins in the historic district and winds to Bonnie Branch Road, northeast of Route 103. But last week, the Howard County Planning Board approved a road extension to College Avenue to accommodate a proposed 74-home development.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | June 18, 1999
Shelley Wygant sees the Howard County Planning Board as a shepherd that needs to keep a sharp eye on its sheep -- the last plots of undeveloped land in the county -- before they get eaten up by the big bad wolf of development.And in her book, the board has fallen asleep on the job, especially after it voted 4-1 yesterday to approve 178 new homes along College Avenue, a designated scenic road near Ellicott City's historic Main Street. The vote was especially significant because the proposed development, called Autumn View V, is one of several major projects planned for Ellicott City's largest swath of undeveloped land -- about 400 acres of fields, streams and woodlands.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1997
Turn right past the Bay 50 shopping center on U.S. 50 in Anne Arundel County and the clatter of trucks fades into the silence of a growing community's struggle with its past.Whitehall Road runs from a Sunoco gas station into fields scarlet with fall, beneath skies alive with geese, past horse farms to the Colonial mansion of Maryland's last British governor.Next spring a developer wants to build 134 homes in a meadow believed to have held Gov. Horatio Sharpe's slave quarters, over the protests of neighbors who say this will ruin the road's historic character.
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