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NEWS
January 30, 2014
Congratulations to Baltimore County Council members David Marks and Vicki Almond, who have introduced a bill to ban certain electronic signs along portions of Charles Street in Towson ( "Bill would ban electronic changeable signage in areas of Towson," Jan. 24). They understand the value of aesthetics. A charming road without harassing signs attracts tourists and home buyers and creates good communities, all of which give back multifold value. Ellen H. Kelly, Baltimore - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Sean Welsh, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2014
A 65-year-old steam locomotive will be restored and transferred from the B&O Railroad Museum to the Western Maryland Scenic Railroad. The restoration will bring the locomotive back to full service. Built by the Baldwin Locomotive Works in September 1949 as the last commercially-built steam locomotive for use by a U.S. railway, the engine has been at the museum since 1972, according to a Western Maryland Scenic Railroad news release. "This historic agreement is a win-win for railroad preservation.
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NEWS
By TIMOTHY B. WHEELER and TIMOTHY B. WHEELER,SUN REPORTER | April 20, 2006
ADAMSTOWN -- The restored stone springhouse on Peter Michael's farm in Frederick County looks much as it did in the days before the Civil War, when runaway slaves are believed to have found shelter there. Michael grew up hearing stories of how his great-grandfather Ezra aided "freedom-seekers" as they fled north along the Underground Railroad, the clandestine network of routes and people helping slaves escape bondage in the early 1800s. But modernity is encroaching on Cooling Springs Farm.
NEWS
By Angie Reyburn | April 28, 2014
adrnews@aol.com 301-648-5410 Spring has finally sprung and Earth Day may be over but protecting our environment and preserving our land is an ongoing process. On Saturday, May 3 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., the Scenic Rivers Land Trust will be celebrating its 25th birthday with a garden party fundraiser at Hidden View Farm, located at 702 Defense Highway, in Crownsville. For detailed information, go to srlt.org. For those not familiar with the Scenic Rivers Land Trust, here is a brief description.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2005
CENTREVILLE - Leaders of an Eastern Shore land preservation group called yesterday for urgent government action to save the rural vistas along a scenic two-lane highway that meanders through what has, until recently, been traditional Delmarva farming country. "This is a National Scenic Byway here," Robert Etgen, executive director of the Eastern Shore Land Conservancy, said as he led Rep. Wayne T. Gilchrest on a tour of Route 213 in Queen Anne's County. "We're going to watch it go down the drain."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2010
It's been about 50 years since smoke-blowing steam locomotives chugged along the rolling mountainside in Petersburg, W.Va. But this weekend, steam trains will be center stage at West Virginia Rails 2010, a festival that celebrates 100 years of a railway line carved into the Appalachian Mountains by the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. The event will feature two steam locomotives as well as several diesel trains, similar to those that traveled the rails of the state's pastoral Eastern Panhandle in the early 1900s.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | June 1, 2001
Perhaps more than any other road, Charles Street tells a tale of more than two centuries of Baltimore's architectural and cultural history. And now, Baltimore city and county officials want to have it recognized as a "national scenic byway," a designation that could mean as much as $80,000 in federal money to identify historic venues and spruce them up with enhancements such as interpretative kiosks, informational signs and even a visitor center....
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2000
When Route 2, more commonly known as Ritchie Highway, was built in the 1930s, it was envisioned as a route to convey motorists quickly across the mosquito-ridden, flat and dusty agrarian Anne Arundel County countryside, to Annapolis and the Eastern Shore resorts that lay beyond. At the end of April, the 41.4-mile highway, which is today home to more than 50 shopping centers, 66 fast-food joints, 25 churches, 128 automobile dealerships, palm readers, funeral homes, tattoo parlors, snowball stands, repair garages, auto parts stores, homes and farms will celebrate its 60th birthday.
NEWS
By Jehangir Pocha and Jehangir Pocha,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 16, 2003
BOMBAY, India -- Along Marine Drive, a sweeping ocean promenade ringed by fading art-deco buildings, lovers gather along the sea wall, kissing and caressing each other, seemingly oblivious to the showers of sea spray and frenetic traffic around them. Couples publicly displaying their affection may seem out of place here, where traditionally the first time a bride saw her groom was on the conjugal bed. But as a new sexual permissiveness has seized this cramped city of 18 million, Bombay's chronic housing problem is forcing many seeking passion out to the city's few scenic spots.
NEWS
By PHOTOS BY BARBARA HADDOCK TAYLOR and PHOTOS BY BARBARA HADDOCK TAYLOR,SUN PHOTOGRAPHER | August 14, 2006
The Western Maryland Scenic Railroad carries riders through the Allegheny Mountains between Cumberland and Frostburg in restored, early 20th-century train cars such as the 1916 Baldwin "Mountain Thunder" steam locomotive. During the fall, the ride, which winds through bends, bridges and tunnels, becomes a popular scenic attraction as the foliage changes.
NEWS
January 30, 2014
Congratulations to Baltimore County Council members David Marks and Vicki Almond, who have introduced a bill to ban certain electronic signs along portions of Charles Street in Towson ( "Bill would ban electronic changeable signage in areas of Towson," Jan. 24). They understand the value of aesthetics. A charming road without harassing signs attracts tourists and home buyers and creates good communities, all of which give back multifold value. Ellen H. Kelly, Baltimore - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
EXPLORE
By Jennifer Broadwater | October 12, 2012
Visitors to Maryland -- and those wanting to explore more of the state they already call home -- can consult a new book showcasing the state's scenic byways and a mobile application that serves as a guide to the area's Civil War trails. Both items are part of the state's effort to boost tourism. Since 2007, Maryland has seen a 26-percent bump in visits -- amounting to an increase of 7.2 million visitors over the five-year period, according to a national survey of U.S. travelers conducted by D.K. Shifflet and Associates, a tourism industry research firm.
FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard and Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2012
Do you feel the nip in the air? Runners do. For them, the advent of fall means more than changing leaves and back to school. Cooler weather and coming races (the Baltimore Running Festival is October 13) make autumn the ideal time to run in the great outdoors. Baltimore is full of places to run, from stately neighborhoods to waterside paths. But for some runners, nothing beats the off-road experience. "Even if you start off easy, it's fun to explore," says Chris Cucuzella, a member of the Baltimore Road Runners Club, a trail running group.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2012
A juke joint, a national park and a health spa for cars - all located within about five blocks of one another. For three days beginning Friday, a stretch of North Charles Street will be transformed into what just might be the coolest stretch of roadway in the U.S. That's the idea behind the Roadside Attractions corridor at Artscape, a collection of art objects, road signs, live performances and interactive installations designed to capture the ambience,...
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2012
Along Lyons Creek in southern Anne Arundel County are woods that offer perfect places for migratory songbirds to hide their young, native trees that provide a fruit buffet for critters, and marshes where ducks scour for snacks. One tract in the area recently took on added significance. When Pat Melville placed her land into a program to ensure that no development can occur on it, she created a milestone for a local nonprofit organization. Her 53 acres became the 50th property placed into a conservation agreement with the Scenic Rivers Land Trust, which is holding the easement jointly with the Maryland Environmental Trust.
NEWS
By Advertorial Content by Mary Medland | July 29, 2011
ADVERTORIAL CONTENT Anyone who is looking for a townhome inEdgewood - with its easy access to the many Baltimore County and Harford County amenities - would be well-advised to consider Bob Ward's Ashby Place. But time is running out: The community of 122 homes has a mere seven units left on the market. "This community in Harford County is almost finished, and we have reduced prices," says Marilyn Payne, vice president of sales for Bob Ward Companies. "The final building is completed for a quick delivery, and the homes here are three-level townhomes with sunrooms that begin in the $190,000s.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | September 6, 2006
A nonprofit group seeking to create a heritage trail network along a 40-mile stretch of the Susquehanna River in Harford and Cecil counties has received a federal grant intended to help get the project started. The $80,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Transportation will be used by the Lower Susquehanna Heritage Greenway Inc. to design a plan for biking and hiking trails along improved roads, create better shoreline access for anglers, and post signs highlighting the culture, history, and environmental aspects of the area.
NEWS
By SANDY ALEXANDER and SANDY ALEXANDER,SUN REPORTER | May 16, 2006
The path of America's first federal highway runs more than 824 miles from Baltimore's Inner Harbor to the Mississippi River - including a 170-mile section in Maryland freshly dotted with interpretive markers and outlined in an accompanying guide. Now tourism officials are urging drivers to discover the inns, churches, parks, bridges and scenic overlooks along the Historic National Road, which follows parts of Route 144, U.S. 40 and Interstate 68 across seven Maryland counties. At a promotional kickoff in Ellicott City yesterday, supporters of the Historic National Road unveiled one of 66 new site markers and a map developed with the help of state agencies, local officials and volunteers.
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