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Scavengers

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NEWS
June 14, 1996
A YEAR AFTER Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke urged the police to investigate scrap dealers and prosecute scavengers stripping vacant houses of plumbing fixtures and other valuable items, a crackdown has finally begun. But it was so poorly thought out that Western District police suspended it after just two weeks.City officials have long been aware of the growing problem of scavenging that in many neighborhoods starts as soon as units become vacant. Surely this is a problem that housing officials and the police can address.
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FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
When the first contestants arrived at Roland Park Place retirement home bearing cards and flowers, residents and staff weren't sure what to make of them. But then it became clear: they were participants in an international scavenger hunt, organized by the grandson of a resident, Mrs. Doris Tippens. Tippens' grandson, Misha Collins, plays the complex angel, Castiel, on the CW show "Supernatural. "  He's also a bit of a real-life angel, organizing the " Greatest International Scavenger Hunt the World Has Ever Seen " (AKA #GISHWHES)
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 27, 1998
GREENWICH, Conn. -- On Tuesday nights, after people in this moneyed town have finished dinner, Tonya White, a fourth-generation Greenwich resident, bundles her toddler into her car and, with her 58-year-old mother, goes hunting for junk.As the boy nods off, mother and daughter cruise the lanes of nearby communities such as Rye, N.Y., and Port Chester, N.Y., and rummage with flashlights through homeowners' trash, sifting out old lamps, dolls, pots, quilts -- anything thrown away as clutter or too much trouble to repair.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2013
PERRYVILLE -- A year ago, Ray Culp weighed 406 pounds and the outlook for his health was grim; he needed a walker and oxygen supply to get around. Today, his weight is down to 270, and he cites two reasons for the vast improvement in his health: He had gastric bypass surgery and his geocache count hit 4,240. The latter refers to the number of "treasures" the 62-year-old Culp has found while hiking and participating in high-tech scavenger hunts known by a few million hobbyists around the world as geocaching (pronounced "geo-cashing")
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,SUN STAFF | September 30, 1995
From Catonsville to California, from New York City to Houston, thieves are taking aim at a new type of loot: recyclable cans, bottles and newspapers.Spurred by the rising value of the materials, curbside scavengers are swiping bagfuls from streets and alleys -- sometimes just ahead of trash trucks. The problem costs localities money -- $100 million per year nationwide, according to an industry estimate -- while clogging the stream of waste that recycling was meant to eliminate.And in some places, it's perfectly legal.
NEWS
April 22, 1995
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's ukase to the police to investigate scrap dealers and prosecute scavengers stripping vacant houses of plumbing fixtures and other valuable items is long overdue. Even a cursory look at the city shows that vacant houses are being devoured by human termites at an alarming rate."Some scrap dealers may think it's a victimless crime. It is not," says Housing Commissioner Daniel P. Henson III. "You leave a home vacant for 24 hours and it's totally stripped."Two factors have caused this epidemic of stripping fixtures.
NEWS
By ANDREW LAM | January 27, 1993
Saigon.-- Saigon, or Ho Chi Minh City as the Vietnamese government still calls it, remembered by many American soldiers as a city of sellers and neon, a prostitute of a city, is becoming the true capital of Vietnam. Defeated by Hanoi, her stern older brother to the north, Saigon now turns her wartime blemishes -- her army of prostitutes, black marketeers, pickpockets and scavengers -- into marks of survival.On a Saigon street a high school drop-out turned food vendor gives his customers sweet rice wrapped in a piece of bitter irony: The paper wrapper is an ink-stained, unfinished school essay describing Uncle Ho's achievements -- Ho's bright road to socialism which now seems headed to a twisted conclusion.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | January 28, 2003
Michael Lang grew up in the 1950s fascinated by the cool guys with slicked-back hair and cigarettes dangling from their lips who hung out at Benny Kitt's pool hall in West Baltimore. Lang wasn't one of them, but as a teen-ager he found a way into their world through his camera - an old Leica with a fast lens that allowed him to take moody, atmospheric, film noir-like photographs of the characters he encountered in Benny's dark, smoky interior. The photographs went into a box and stayed there until 1995, when Lang, by then a research scientist at the National Institutes of Health, looked at them again and realized he had unwittingly captured a pungent and historically important slice of Baltimore's storied past.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | April 24, 2004
Veedor the Andean condor spread his wings to their full 9 1/2 -foot span yesterday and took to the air over North Baltimore. True, he soared no higher than 6 or 8 feet above the soccer field at the Friends School on North Charles Street. It was hot, after all, much hotter than the cool Andean crags where his kind evolved millions of years ago. But watching Veedor sweep across the field and land at their feet was thrilling enough for almost 1,000 cheering Friends students and faculty. Veedor was the highlight of the school's observance of Earth Day. "Awesome!"
TRAVEL
January 21, 2001
Vacationers will vie for a $100,000 prize in global contest Globetrotters looking for the ultimate in vacation adventures might want to grab a like-minded friend and take a look at GreatEscape2001.com, where they can enter the first Great Escape global scavenger hunt and compete for the title of "World's Greatest Traveler" -- and also $100,000 in cash and prizes. The fun doesn't come cheap, though. Each of the 25 teams of two people must pay a $22,000 entry fee, which breaks down to an $11,000-per-person trip in which meals are not included.
NEWS
For The Aegis | September 19, 2012
On Saturday afternoon, Bel Air was crawling with people donning green shirts and looking for something. While the folks wearing green shirts were looking for items as part of a scavenger hunt, they were helping in a small way to find effective treatments for melanoma. This was the fifth year for the Bel Air Scavenger Hunt, but the first time the event was organized as a fundraiser. The beneficiary of the event is the foundation Kelly's Dream, established two years ago with the goal of promoting the organization of many small events to raise money to fight melanoma.
EXPLORE
July 15, 2012
The City of Westminster's Department of Recreation and Parks is celebrating National Parks and Recreation Month with a number of events, including these listed below. Some are special events, others are simple suggestions to keep children and families active for the summer. The department is also hosting a "Parks of Westminster Scavenger Hunt," which involves visiting various parks in the city for details on the hunt - or on any of the events listed below, go to http://www.westgov.com/recreation/rec_events_july.html or call 410-848-9161.  Monday, July 16 - The Rec on the Move program will be at the Charles Street Tot Lot, 6-7:30 p.m. Tuesday, July 17 - Fly at Kite Day at King Park, Chase Street.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella | laura.vozzella@baltsun.com | January 29, 2011
Michael Pesi may have met the woman of his dreams in the modest surroundings of a Merchant's Tire waiting room, but when it came time to propose marriage, he thought big. He considered whisking girlfriend Aletta Muzila off to New York and popping the question over dinner at their favorite celebrity chef's restaurant but nixed the idea. "It was trite," Pesi concluded. "It's been done before. " So the Parkville entrepreneur and investor came up with a more unusual scheme. He took Muzila, a psychotherapist, to his childhood home in West Virginia last Thanksgiving and tricked her into going out to the mall with relatives.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | February 19, 2010
Tom Vidnovic remembers it sounding pretty silly on a cold January day about three years ago, when a friend suggested they go traipsing through the woods to look for a plastic container someone had hidden. He probably thought it was even sillier when his friend insisted on bringing along a hand-held Global Positioning System navigational device to help in the search. Vidnovic ended up finding the container before his friend did - "beginner's luck," he insists - and hasn't stopped looking for similar containers since; so far, he's found a little more than 3,100 of them.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | September 18, 2008
Metal-scavenging thieves surprised George Farrant and his neighbors one recent morning. He woke up at 4:30 a.m. and was able to use his water. But when his wife got up for a 6 a.m. jog, nothing came out of the taps. And the Farrants weren't the only ones. Baltimore police are investigating the theft of at least 16 water meters Sept. 10 from Briarclift Road in the Hunting Ridge neighborhood of Southwest Baltimore. They were presumably taken for their copper and brass parts. Around the region, metal objects such as railings, air conditioning parts and manhole covers are often stolen, and law enforcement officials suspect they are sold as scrap.
NEWS
By Alia Malik and Alia Malik,Sun reporter | June 23, 2007
John Smith explored the Patapsco River here in his search for a passageway to the Pacific Ocean. The Baltimore & Ohio Railroad passed through here. Blacks fought against slavery and segregation here, and community members fought here against plans to run a highway through the trees and brush. All of these events happened on soil that is now part of the Gwynns Falls Trail, which winds along Gwynns Falls and up the Patapsco. At 15 miles, it is one of the nation's largest urban nature trails.
FEATURES
By Donna Erickson and Donna Erickson,King Features Syndicate | May 30, 1992
When it comes to garage sales, my kids and I are hooked. And we're not the only ones, if the numerous garage-sale ads in the newspaper are any indication.Once we've chosen our destination, the kids stuff their weekly allowance into pocket or pouch, and off we go in search of special treasures and good deals.Our best bet is finding Saturday "block sales," where rows of houses display their castoffs on lawns and driveways. That way, my school-age kids can look for toys or sports equipment in one yard, while I look for clothes and household items in another.
NEWS
By BRIAN SULLAM | May 15, 1994
For months, Carroll County's three commissioners have known that some real dirty business has been taking place at the county's two landfills, but they have been dancing around the problem rather than confronting it.In a word, the problem is recycling. But it is not the recycling of yard waste, bottles or paper. This problem involves scavenging metals such as aluminum, copper and brass as well as usable building materials and other odds and ends that can be sold at yard sales or auctions.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD and KEVIN COWHERD,SUN REPORTER | June 9, 2007
It's a little after 2 on a hot Saturday afternoon when Carole Kaminski climbs on a bench in the square at South Broadway and Thames Street to announce that the Secrets of Fells Point Scavenger Hunt is about to begin. There are 11 of us gathered around her. Most of us have not been on a scavenger hunt since elementary school. Neither have we taken turns flailing blindfolded at a pinata or playing Pin the Tail on the Donkey since then, but we're here for one compelling reason: We have no social life.
NEWS
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,Special to The Sun | October 22, 2006
A 2000 graduate of Anne Arundel Community College Demetria Brown-Sugar Stallings still keeps in touch with many of her classmates. Now she's about to find more of them. The Severn resident recently signed on to lead a team in an unusual scavenger hunt -- a hunt for alumni. Lured by a $500 first price, at least five teams have accepted the challenge to find the biggest number. The winner will be announced Dec. 1. The idea for the scavenger hunt began with the recognition that community colleges, like their four-year counterparts, benefit when they continue their relationships with former students.
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