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NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | January 25, 2004
THEY'VE FACED down the budget monster, driven it back into its hole, dismissed it so cavalierly that many in the kingdom may believe there is no deficit. They have balanced their $23.8 billion budget with a nip here, a tuck there, a deft transfer, a shift, a blink and a nod. They have located hidden stashes of cash. They have used an assistant attorney general's opinion to reduce their commitment to the education budget. They have been resourceful and creative. Or, perhaps, they have discovered that state government can push debt into the future the way Americans treat credit card debt.
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NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | January 25, 2004
THEY'VE FACED down the budget monster, driven it back into its hole, dismissed it so cavalierly that many in the kingdom may believe there is no deficit. They have balanced their $23.8 billion budget with a nip here, a tuck there, a deft transfer, a shift, a blink and a nod. They have located hidden stashes of cash. They have used an assistant attorney general's opinion to reduce their commitment to the education budget. They have been resourceful and creative. Or, perhaps, they have discovered that state government can push debt into the future the way Americans treat credit card debt.
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NEWS
By Gregory Kane | May 16, 2001
IT'S ALL IN the quote, dear readers. Here are some sayings from folks and media sources that leave us with much to ponder. "At the pleasure of." That phrase comes to us from former state Sen. Larry Young, now a talk-show host on Radio One's WOLB (1010 AM). When city Comptroller Joan Pratt fired Tony Ambridge, the more-than-capable real estate officer for Baltimore, there was Young, championing Pratt's decision and crowing that people like Ambridge serve "at the pleasure of" those like Pratt.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | March 22, 2003
FOR YEARS I've heard little components of a story I promised to myself I'd try to nail down around the time of the Academy Awards ceremony. It surrounds Margaret Mitchell, the author of the novel Gone With the Wind, which, of course, became the basis of the celebrated film. It also concerns our Sisters of Mercy, the Roman Catholic order so well-known in Baltimore. I've always been fascinated by Mitchell, who died in 1949 after being hit by a Peachtree Street taxicab in Atlanta. My mother always warned me as a child that I would wind up like Margaret - she had spotted my careless, daydreaming style while crossing streets.
NEWS
By Jean Marie Beall and Jean Marie Beall,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 22, 2000
IN HIGH SCHOOL, Vicki Wisner was the girl who refused to take home economics where mostly girls were taught to sew and cook. Instead, the Taneytown woman who has spent the past two decades making ballgowns, wedding dresses and Civil War attire for re-enactors, felt more at home taking shop class. "The way they taught sewing in high school was so uninteresting," Wisner said, thinking back to her high school days. "I hated home economics. I took all the shop classes instead." But Wisner was involved in theater in high school and got to know Dorothy Elderdice, who sewed all the costumes for area high schools' musical productions.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | March 22, 2003
FOR YEARS I've heard little components of a story I promised to myself I'd try to nail down around the time of the Academy Awards ceremony. It surrounds Margaret Mitchell, the author of the novel Gone With the Wind, which, of course, became the basis of the celebrated film. It also concerns our Sisters of Mercy, the Roman Catholic order so well-known in Baltimore. I've always been fascinated by Mitchell, who died in 1949 after being hit by a Peachtree Street taxicab in Atlanta. My mother always warned me as a child that I would wind up like Margaret - she had spotted my careless, daydreaming style while crossing streets.
NEWS
By KEVIN THOMAS | June 19, 1994
If you want to see how far a human being will go in defense of his own self-interest, do something that impacts negatively on his property value.Nothing is quite so rabid as a person settled comfortably onto his quarter-acre, when suddenly a threat appears on the horizon.It's downright primal. The adrenalin starts pumping. All rational thought is put aside. Battle gear is donned. It's off to war. How else do you explain the response of several Howard County residents who live near the site where a youth soccer complex is being proposed?
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | September 18, 1990
On the telephone is my mother, with news that a strange man is running around with my face."Good," I say, "he can have it. What am I getting in exchange, his liver?"Apparently, no such balance of body parts is involved. It seems some fellow is using my face as a reference point, a kind of cultural icon, to pursue romance through the personal columns.These are the little classified ads where men and women seek relationships by declaring in print what spectacular individuals they are and leaving it unmentioned that they haven't had an actual living date since the Ford administration -- Henry's, not Gerald's.
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach | July 2, 1997
PARIS -- Not for the claustrophobic is the tiny, aging, gilt-and-mirrored elevator that lurches its way to the third floor of 14 rue Cambon. The ascent, which seems to take forever, allows an American passenger -- we shall call her Madame S. -- time enough to wonder if Brigitte Bardot or Jeanne Moreau felt so intimately confined on their way to the salon of Alice Cadolle to have their breasts measured and fitted.Claustrophic or not, Bardot and Moreau, along with other women wealthy enough to buy not only couture gowns but couture undergarments, are more than willing to enter the small cage that will deliver them into the waiting hands and tape measure of the last custom corsetiere in Paris.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | November 14, 1994
There's no "Scarlett" on CBS tonight, but there is a "Scarlett" on TBS -- "The Scarlett O'Hara War," a 1980 telemovie (actually, one portion of a larger miniseries called "Moviola") about the hunt for the actress to star in "Gone With the Wind." Elsewhere on TV, there's an unexpected romantic entanglement on "Murphy Brown," and an unexpected romantic disentanglement on "Northern Exposure." Welcome to sweeps month.* "Melrose Place." (8-9 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- In tonight's episode, Amanda (Heather Locklear)
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | May 16, 2001
IT'S ALL IN the quote, dear readers. Here are some sayings from folks and media sources that leave us with much to ponder. "At the pleasure of." That phrase comes to us from former state Sen. Larry Young, now a talk-show host on Radio One's WOLB (1010 AM). When city Comptroller Joan Pratt fired Tony Ambridge, the more-than-capable real estate officer for Baltimore, there was Young, championing Pratt's decision and crowing that people like Ambridge serve "at the pleasure of" those like Pratt.
NEWS
By Jean Marie Beall and Jean Marie Beall,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 22, 2000
IN HIGH SCHOOL, Vicki Wisner was the girl who refused to take home economics where mostly girls were taught to sew and cook. Instead, the Taneytown woman who has spent the past two decades making ballgowns, wedding dresses and Civil War attire for re-enactors, felt more at home taking shop class. "The way they taught sewing in high school was so uninteresting," Wisner said, thinking back to her high school days. "I hated home economics. I took all the shop classes instead." But Wisner was involved in theater in high school and got to know Dorothy Elderdice, who sewed all the costumes for area high schools' musical productions.
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach | July 2, 1997
PARIS -- Not for the claustrophobic is the tiny, aging, gilt-and-mirrored elevator that lurches its way to the third floor of 14 rue Cambon. The ascent, which seems to take forever, allows an American passenger -- we shall call her Madame S. -- time enough to wonder if Brigitte Bardot or Jeanne Moreau felt so intimately confined on their way to the salon of Alice Cadolle to have their breasts measured and fitted.Claustrophic or not, Bardot and Moreau, along with other women wealthy enough to buy not only couture gowns but couture undergarments, are more than willing to enter the small cage that will deliver them into the waiting hands and tape measure of the last custom corsetiere in Paris.
NEWS
By KEVIN THOMAS | June 19, 1994
If you want to see how far a human being will go in defense of his own self-interest, do something that impacts negatively on his property value.Nothing is quite so rabid as a person settled comfortably onto his quarter-acre, when suddenly a threat appears on the horizon.It's downright primal. The adrenalin starts pumping. All rational thought is put aside. Battle gear is donned. It's off to war. How else do you explain the response of several Howard County residents who live near the site where a youth soccer complex is being proposed?
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | September 18, 1990
On the telephone is my mother, with news that a strange man is running around with my face."Good," I say, "he can have it. What am I getting in exchange, his liver?"Apparently, no such balance of body parts is involved. It seems some fellow is using my face as a reference point, a kind of cultural icon, to pursue romance through the personal columns.These are the little classified ads where men and women seek relationships by declaring in print what spectacular individuals they are and leaving it unmentioned that they haven't had an actual living date since the Ford administration -- Henry's, not Gerald's.
NEWS
February 12, 2006
on February 9, 2006, CARL A., beloved husband of Lorraine V. Williams. Loving father of Deborah Ann Porter, Karen Frances Stevens and husband Michael, Gregory Williams and wife Mel, and Thomas L. Williams. Cherished grandfather of Mike, Kimberly, Kristy, Marty, Katie, Brandon and Katie Scarlett O'Hara. Dear great-grandfather of Kayla and Aidan. Friends may call at THE JOHNSON FUNERAL HOME, P. A., 8521 Loch Raven Boulevard (beltway exit 29-B) on Sunday from 2 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. where a wake service will be held at 2:30 P. M. Family and friends are invited to attend a Mass on Monday in the Church of the Immaculate Heart of Mary at 11:00 A.M. Interment private.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2011
This Sunday's review of Joey Chiu's Greenspring Inn, which will be celebrating its 20th annivesary later this summer. Some things have staying power, others don't. Also in 1991, John Steven Ltd. opened its garden and added table service. Leilani's Restaurant opened in the Scarlett O'Hara space on Antique Row, Weber's on Boston opened in what would become a notoroius Canton restaurant space, Grand Central (né Grand Central) opened in Mt. Vernon and a black-tie gathering atteneded the opening of Hackerman House at the Walters Art Museum (then, Gallery)
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