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Scarlet Letter

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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | November 9, 1995
Not being one to be scared away by anything as piddling as a major motion picture (especially one that died a quick death), Fell's Point Corner Theatre is presenting Phyllis Nagy's theatrical adaptation of Nathaniel Hawthorne's "The Scarlet Letter," beginning tomorrow. Barry Feinstein directs a cast headed by Mary Anne Perry as Hester Prynne.Show times at Fell's Point Corner, 251 S. Ann St., are 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, with matinees at 2 p.m. Sundays, through Dec. 17. Tickets are $10 and $11. Call (410)
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NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | November 18, 2013
"Character is what you do when no one is watching. " It's a bit of a trite saying, attributed to coaches, motivational speakers and fortune cookie writers (by the way, whose idea was it to replace fortune cookie predictions with treacly aphorisms from the "Successories" reject pile?). Still, the expression's popularity illustrates the power of the idea behind it. Character is what you do when the only controlling authority is your conscience. Because young people do not yet have fully formed characters, they often need incentives beyond exhortations to do the right thing.
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NEWS
By Patrick J. Buchanan | September 19, 1990
WELL, there goes the B'nai B'rith Man of the Year Award.Friday last, after a morning drive home from a good night at the speakers forum in Petersburg, Va., last redoubt of Lee's Army, I was handed a copy of a column by A.M. Rosenthal of the New York Times. Bearing the portentous title, "Forgive them not," the column was 700 words of sustained venom, charging me with "anti-Semitism" and a "blood libel" against the Jews.Abe pinned the scarlet letter on me, the Big "A.""The man reaches millions," Rosenthal wrote, "Abroad, he gets attention as a possible presidential candidate."
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2012
Midway through her season, Ballet Theatre of Maryland artistic director Dianna Cuatto presented an ambitious, innovative program offering two seldom-produced one-act ballets. Striking in originality, "Firebird" displayed Cuatto's choreographic artistry in all its fiery intensity. "The Scarlet Letter" showed her profound insight into a literary classic. Introducing three BTM performances last weekend, Cuatto shared her fondness for both works and their significance in her career as a dancer and choreographer.
NEWS
By Andrew M. Greeley | April 13, 1995
I WONDER WHAT John Harvard, righteous puritan that he was, thinks of his university.Presumably he would be appalled at the lack of godliness at the institution. But the Gena Grant case proves that puritan cruelty is still alive and well.Ms. Grant is the young woman who was a class president and a straight-A student who, at the age of 14, killed her abusive, intoxicated mother.My concern is not with the immorality of Ms. Grant's action. Leave that to the talk-show justices and to God. Her mother's brother testified for the young woman in court and her sentence was mild (a few months in a juvenile home and probation)
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 23, 1995
The good news is, it's better than the movie. The not-so-good news is, it's still not a rousing dramatic event."The Scarlet Letter," that is. Fell's Point Corner Theatre has conveniently mounted a stage adaptation of Nathaniel Hawthorne's tale of the early settlers just in time forThanksgiving.But while we can be thankful we're spared such cinematic moments as seeing Hester Prynne's husband running around the woods wearing a dead deer on his head, what we get instead tends to feel like a school pageant.
FEATURES
By STEPHEN HUNTER and STEPHEN HUNTER,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 13, 1995
I can see it now. Frail, intense, literary, the fiery Nathaniel Hawthorne is bent over his desk in the dark interior of that New York Custom House in the year 1849, writing dementedly with his feather quill, his fisle and says, "Hey, Morrie, if you shot a pilgrim in the throat with an arrow, would the blood spurt when it came out or would it just, you know, kind of dribble out?"It probably never happened, but nevertheless here's a version of "The Scarlet Letter" for the big screen that suggests it might have.
NEWS
March 2, 1997
IN A richly deserved curt dismissal, the Supreme Court has rebuffed states that have sought to bypass it and the Constitution by adopting a pernicious practice known as "scarlet letter initiatives."Last year, nine states adopted such initiatives, decreeing that if their representatives in Congress did not vote for a specific term-limits provision, their apostasy would be cited on the ballot in subsequent elections.By a delicious irony, this helped defeat the key legislative effort to pass a proposed constitutional amendment to limit Senate and House service to 12 years in each chamber.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 25, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Less than two weeks after a proposed constitutional amendment to impose term limits on Congress failed in the House, supporters of the movement lost another round in the Supreme Court yesterday.Without comment, the court turned aside the first effort by a state to punish its members of Congress for failing to endorse the term limits preferred by home-state voters.A ballot measure approved in Arkansas would have placed a notation next to the name of congressional candidates on a voting ballot who failed to fight for the term limits favored in their states.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 1, 2004
Artistic director Dianna Cuatto's first season with Ballet Theatre of Maryland closes this weekend with two performances of Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter. Cuatto caps an exciting season of contemporary, classic and neoclassic choreography with a flesh-and-blood heroine from an American literary classic, far removed from the usual formulaic, Cinderella-like ballet subject. Hawthorne's mid-19th- century novel tells the story of Hester Prynne, perhaps the first feminist heroine.
NEWS
February 19, 2012
Catholics have it backward: Every god is made in the likeness of man. My mom created me (there is evidence for this). I have to object to "God's beautiful design," as we are a beautiful product of non-random selection. Sure, the church is making progress. It used to burn women and now it only suppresses them. Our self-made design is to attempt intercourse wherever and whenever we can, and our kids should be doing this vaccinated and with readily-available contraception. In this secular society, no one wears a scarlet letter for reproducing before marriage or being attracted to the same sex. Same-sex couples have a right to their sexuality in a free society.
NEWS
By Mary Meehan | January 22, 2007
Here we are again at the anniversary of the Supreme Court's 1973 Roe v. Wade decision on abortion. While the March for Life legions rally in the cold to protest that decision, NARAL Pro-Choice America and other groups celebrate a "woman's right to choose." Catherine Callaghan, co-founder of Feminists for Life of America, taught linguistics at Ohio State University. She once remarked: "Choose is a transitive verb; it requires an object. Finish the sentence - choose what?" Ah, but the main point of saying "right to choose" and "pro-choice" and "the choice issue" is to avoid the word abortion.
NEWS
By VICTORIA A. BROWNWORTH and VICTORIA A. BROWNWORTH,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 23, 2005
ANGEL AND APOSTLE Deborah Noyes Unbridled Books / 304 pages The scarlet "A" of Nathaniel Hawthorne's classic novel of Puritanical repression and retribution is both a compelling metaphor and an iconic colloquialism of American culture. But what happened to Hester Prynne after the A? Unlike the stain on Monica Lewinsky's blue dress, the scarlet letter affixed to Hester garnered her only shame in the society into which she had borne her out-of-wedlock daughter. What of the daughter, the little sprite Pearl?
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 8, 2004
Ballet Theatre of Maryland closed its season with a stunning adaptation of Nathaniel Hawthorne's novel The Scarlet Letter choreographed by artistic director Dianna Cuatto. Last weekend's program also featured two shorter Cuatto ballets: "Prelude, Fugue and Rifts" danced to Leonard Bernstein's Clarinet Concerto, and "Lumieroque" with music by Albinoni. The improvisational eight-minute "Prelude, Fugue and Riffs" was a lively opener that perfectly fit Bernstein's very American music and stretched the dancers.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 1, 2004
Artistic director Dianna Cuatto's first season with Ballet Theatre of Maryland closes this weekend with two performances of Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter. Cuatto caps an exciting season of contemporary, classic and neoclassic choreography with a flesh-and-blood heroine from an American literary classic, far removed from the usual formulaic, Cinderella-like ballet subject. Hawthorne's mid-19th- century novel tells the story of Hester Prynne, perhaps the first feminist heroine.
NEWS
By Mark Cloud | May 4, 2003
YOU'VE SEEN us on rain-soaked city streets. Married men scurrying from the anonymity of faceless buildings onto the harsh scrutiny of public sidewalks. We pull the collars of our trench coats up and keep our heads down. We avoid eye contact, our eyes darting back and forth as we hurry past you. It's as if we think you won't notice our shame. But we can't hide from your judgmental stares. You need not see our eyes to know what we've done, to know how we've betrayed our wives. We carry our shame like a scarlet letter, a big pink and yellow and scarlet letter.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 7, 2000
WASHINGTON - A day before the nation elects a new Congress, the Supreme Court explored yesterday how far to let the states go in the continuing campaign to limit the terms of members of the House and Senate. An hourlong hearing on a Missouri constitutional amendment left the clear impression that advocates of term limits would fail - for the second time in five years - in their efforts to restrict the time one can serve in Congress. Frustrated by a 1995 Supreme Court decision striking down states' direct attempts to impose term limits on Congress, a number of states switched to a fallback maneuver, called a "scarlet letter" strategy of putting negative labels on the ballot next to the names of candidates who have not embraced term limits.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | May 20, 2000
With a 3-5 favorite in the field, the Preakness isn't a mystery for bettors this year. It's a dare. Do you dare bet against a horse who has a serious shot at becoming the first Triple Crown winner since 1978? Are you willing to live with looking extremely stupid in hindsight? The Umpteenth Annual Unofficial Preakness Betting Guide, faithfully presented in this space on race day, raises the point not to be catty, but as a public service, a warning. Just to let you know what could be at stake when you reach the betting window today.
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