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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 5, 2001
Marsalis Creation: Branford Marsalis, saxophone; Orpheus Chamber Orchestra. (Sony Classical SK 89251) Classical-music fans who normally shy away from anything smacking of crossover-itis shouldn't hesitate to check out this thoroughly engaging collection of saxy, sometimes sexy French music. Like his brother Wynton, saxophonist Branford Marsalis has the chops for both classical and jazz repertoire, with a warm, well-focused tone and fluent technique. Here, he gets to apply his talents to such jazz-inflected scores as Milhaud's "La Creation du monde" and Ibert's "Concertino" (he slips some fabulous riffs of his own into Ibert's third-movement cadenza)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2013
The sculpture court at the Walters Art Museum is one of Baltimore's most inviting spaces. Acoustically, it's a bit of a soup, but who cares in such an ambience? That point was drive home Sunday evening when An Die Musik Live and the Walters presented the last in this season's series of early music concerts. This one, which drew a spill-over crowd, featured one of the Baltimore Symphony's star players, principal trumpet Andrew Balio, in a bright burst of baroque repertoire.
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NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 24, 2003
The Candlelight Concert Society of Howard County has provided world-class string quartet playing this season - the legendary Guarneri Quartet - as well as piano trios, cello sonatas, chamber music with a Latin flair, an up-and-coming pianist and a super-charged baroque ensemble inspired by the music of Antonio Vivaldi. We've not had the opportunity, however, to enjoy an international prize-winning classical guitarist. To that end, Candlelight will conclude its 2002-2003 subscription season May 3 with a recital by Franco Platino, a young Italian guitarist from Baltimore's Peabody Institute who has won a Golden Guitar award for his prodigious, sumptuously recorded debut recital on the enterprising Naxos Records label.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 24, 2003
The Candlelight Concert Society of Howard County has provided world-class string quartet playing this season - the legendary Guarneri Quartet - as well as piano trios, cello sonatas, chamber music with a Latin flair, an up-and-coming pianist and a super-charged baroque ensemble inspired by the music of Antonio Vivaldi. We've not had the opportunity, however, to enjoy an international prize-winning classical guitarist. To that end, Candlelight will conclude its 2002-2003 subscription season May 3 with a recital by Franco Platino, a young Italian guitarist from Baltimore's Peabody Institute who has won a Golden Guitar award for his prodigious, sumptuously recorded debut recital on the enterprising Naxos Records label.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | November 20, 1993
Maria Tipo may not be a household word, but the 61-year-old Italian pianist's reputation among connoisseurs is such that her recital last night completely filled the Kennedy Center's Terrace Theater. It was a typical Tipo recital -- filled with magic from the first notes of Mozart's Sonata in E Flat (K. 282) to the thundering chords that concluded Chopin's "Black Key" Etude, her final encore.That Tipo, unlike most Mozarteans, did not come to grief in this relatively early work was because she understood and was able to articulate the songfulness at its heart and was able to trace the dancelike rhythms that organize it.Five Scarlatti sonatas showed why Tipo was dubbed the "Neapolitan Horowitz."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | April 1, 2001
Piano fans need no introduction to Horacio Gutierrez, the brilliant, Cuban-born pianist who has been livening up the scene for more than 30 years with his combination of technical bravura and unfailing musicality. He brings his talents to the Shriver Hall Concert Series today in an enticingly rich program that includes Beethoven's gar-gantuan "Hammerklavier" Sonata; Schumann's passionate C major Fantasie; the post-romantic sonata, Op. 1, by Alban Berg; and "Nine Bagatelles," written in 1999 by Pulitzer Prize-winning George Perle.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2013
The sculpture court at the Walters Art Museum is one of Baltimore's most inviting spaces. Acoustically, it's a bit of a soup, but who cares in such an ambience? That point was drive home Sunday evening when An Die Musik Live and the Walters presented the last in this season's series of early music concerts. This one, which drew a spill-over crowd, featured one of the Baltimore Symphony's star players, principal trumpet Andrew Balio, in a bright burst of baroque repertoire.
NEWS
By GLENN McNATT | August 14, 1993
The great names of the piano world are household words even among people who don't know very much about music.Everyone has heard of Horowitz, Rubenstein, Van Cliburn. These are the superstars of the music business, and their careers are the stuff of legend. Yet great talent doesn't always guarantee what is called in the business a ''big career.'' In fact it almost never does.Consider that every year some 15,000 young pianists are graduated from the nation's music schools and conservatories.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 31, 2002
It may seem as though the cause of great music hit the daily double back in 1685. Johann Sebastian Bach, the groundbreaking genius who would honor the world with the B-minor Mass, the Brandenburg Concertos, and the most profound lessons in harmony it would ever receive, was born in Eisenach, Germany. Several dozen miles to the east, George Frederick Handel, whose operas and oratorios would one day have the likes of Joseph Haydn, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and Ludwig van Beethoven genuflecting with reverence, also was brought into the world that year.
NEWS
By Larry Harris and Larry Harris,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1995
"Baroque Inventions," music of Scarlatti, Bach and Handel, performed by Julian Gray and Ronald Pearl; Dorian DOR-90209It is an eternal mystery why the music gods deigned to have Johann Sebastian Bach, George Frideric Handel and Domenico Scarlatti born in the same year, 1685, but 300 years later the world is still captivated by their talent.Their music is in wonderful hands when performed by the Baltimore guitar duo of Julian Gray and Ronald Pearl, who seem to have acquired seven-league boots since they signed a six-disc contract with Dorian.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 31, 2002
It may seem as though the cause of great music hit the daily double back in 1685. Johann Sebastian Bach, the groundbreaking genius who would honor the world with the B-minor Mass, the Brandenburg Concertos, and the most profound lessons in harmony it would ever receive, was born in Eisenach, Germany. Several dozen miles to the east, George Frederick Handel, whose operas and oratorios would one day have the likes of Joseph Haydn, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and Ludwig van Beethoven genuflecting with reverence, also was brought into the world that year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 5, 2001
Marsalis Creation: Branford Marsalis, saxophone; Orpheus Chamber Orchestra. (Sony Classical SK 89251) Classical-music fans who normally shy away from anything smacking of crossover-itis shouldn't hesitate to check out this thoroughly engaging collection of saxy, sometimes sexy French music. Like his brother Wynton, saxophonist Branford Marsalis has the chops for both classical and jazz repertoire, with a warm, well-focused tone and fluent technique. Here, he gets to apply his talents to such jazz-inflected scores as Milhaud's "La Creation du monde" and Ibert's "Concertino" (he slips some fabulous riffs of his own into Ibert's third-movement cadenza)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | April 1, 2001
Piano fans need no introduction to Horacio Gutierrez, the brilliant, Cuban-born pianist who has been livening up the scene for more than 30 years with his combination of technical bravura and unfailing musicality. He brings his talents to the Shriver Hall Concert Series today in an enticingly rich program that includes Beethoven's gar-gantuan "Hammerklavier" Sonata; Schumann's passionate C major Fantasie; the post-romantic sonata, Op. 1, by Alban Berg; and "Nine Bagatelles," written in 1999 by Pulitzer Prize-winning George Perle.
NEWS
By Larry Harris and Larry Harris,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1995
"Baroque Inventions," music of Scarlatti, Bach and Handel, performed by Julian Gray and Ronald Pearl; Dorian DOR-90209It is an eternal mystery why the music gods deigned to have Johann Sebastian Bach, George Frideric Handel and Domenico Scarlatti born in the same year, 1685, but 300 years later the world is still captivated by their talent.Their music is in wonderful hands when performed by the Baltimore guitar duo of Julian Gray and Ronald Pearl, who seem to have acquired seven-league boots since they signed a six-disc contract with Dorian.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | November 20, 1993
Maria Tipo may not be a household word, but the 61-year-old Italian pianist's reputation among connoisseurs is such that her recital last night completely filled the Kennedy Center's Terrace Theater. It was a typical Tipo recital -- filled with magic from the first notes of Mozart's Sonata in E Flat (K. 282) to the thundering chords that concluded Chopin's "Black Key" Etude, her final encore.That Tipo, unlike most Mozarteans, did not come to grief in this relatively early work was because she understood and was able to articulate the songfulness at its heart and was able to trace the dancelike rhythms that organize it.Five Scarlatti sonatas showed why Tipo was dubbed the "Neapolitan Horowitz."
NEWS
By GLENN McNATT | August 14, 1993
The great names of the piano world are household words even among people who don't know very much about music.Everyone has heard of Horowitz, Rubenstein, Van Cliburn. These are the superstars of the music business, and their careers are the stuff of legend. Yet great talent doesn't always guarantee what is called in the business a ''big career.'' In fact it almost never does.Consider that every year some 15,000 young pianists are graduated from the nation's music schools and conservatories.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | February 4, 1995
Some European critics and piano fanciers put the young Venezuelan Sergio Daniel Tiempo in a triumvirate of precocious pianistic talent with the Russians Evgeny Kissin and Konstantin Lifschitz. Tiempo's recital Thursday at the Kennedy Center's Terrace Theater showed that he is indeed an extraordinary young pianist, but also indicated that he is doesn't yet approach the miraculously mature artistry of either Kissin, 23, or Lifschitz, 18.Tiempo, 22, sounds -- appropriately enough -- his age. That meant he was at his best in music that reveled in pianistic muscle-flexing, such as "Scarbo" in Ravel's "Gaspard de la Nuit," Liszt's "Mephisto Waltz" and the bravura portions of Chopin's "Andante Spianato and Grand Polonaise."
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing writer | February 7, 1992
Clive Swansbourne is a 37-year-old pianist whose "curriculum vitae" includes a diploma from London's Royal College of Music and a stint at Yale studying with Claude Frank, one of America's great exponents of the Beethoven piano sonatas.Swansbourne's base of operations isIdaho State University, where he is a resident artist. He maintains a busy schedule of recitals, chamber concerts and master classes across the United States and Canada.One of these concerts was presented at North County High School Saturday evening under the auspices of the Performing Arts Associationof Linthicum.
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