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By Janet Gilbert | May 4, 2008
For one weekend at our middle school, the gymnasium becomes "backstage" and the cafeteria transforms into an auditorium. Thus, we are able to enjoy two nights of terrific theater -- this year's production of Oz based on the classic The Wizard of Oz; directed by a couple of either extremely patient or highly medicated volunteers. The weekend before the show, it was time to work on my son's costume as the Scarecrow. On Friday night, I distinctly remember saying to him during dinner: "Let's try to avoid the stress of rushing around on Sunday night, and get this project started first thing tomorrow morning."
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NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2012
Everyone who has ever sat before a television or movie screen to enjoy the fantasy of "The Wizard of Oz" should plan to see how magical this family favorite becomes onstage at Toby's Dinner Theatre in Columbia. The production brings the beloved characters live and up-close, so that we feel we are traveling the Yellow Brick Road with Dorothy and her newfound friends, the Scarecrow, the Tin Man, and the Cowardly Lion. Director David James transfers this 1939 film classic — which was based on the book by L. Frank Baum — to 2012, and dazzles us with a fabulous cast and exciting special effects that include swirling tornadoes that whisk us away from Kansas.
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FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | October 22, 1993
The scarecrow, 1993:He's perched on the front lawn wearing polyester slacks, a pipe cleaner smile and Brillo-pad brows. Not exactly Freddy Krueger, is he?No matter, says Mark Baron, owner of Scarecrow Fun, a Bethesda-based company that teaches how to make these straw forms. Scarecrows today aren't intended to frighten us; scarecrows, he says, are our friends.Perhaps no creation has been a better friend to Mr. Baron than these stuffed characters. During the past 17 years, he's built a 15-employee business, traveled around the country and even attained the title "the world's only living scarecrow artist."
EXPLORE
By Lou Boulmetishippodromehatter@aol.com | July 8, 2011
It's a sorry state of affairs when birds perch on a scarecrow. But that's precisely what happens when birds become too familiar with a scarecrow that isn't periodically relocated or replaced by a different scarecrow. Still, have you ever heard of an animal repeller that attracts birds? It's strange, yet true. A robin was so attracted to the red light-emitting diode on our YardGuard Silent Animal Repeller, it relentlessly pecked at the LED, presumably trying to eat it. I was surprised, because birds typically shy away from shiny objects.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Staff Writer | October 11, 1992
Kimberly Snyder, 4, knelt, grasped a clump of straw in her tin hand and thrust it deep inside a pair of gray polyester trousers. Nearby, her twin sister, Samantha, padded about an ever-expanding sea of straw, dumping armfuls into a blue-and-gray shirt.L "Fill those pants. Make them big," said their mother, Tracy."He'll look just like Daddy," she said, referring to the trousers' growing waistline.The comment sailed right past the platinum-haired girls who were concentrating on trying to build the perfect scarecrow.
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Staff Writer | October 11, 1992
Oz's empty-headed scarecrow may not get a brain during Fal Harvest Days at the Carroll County Farm Museum, but he could beef up the rest of his body.Visitors to the 27-year-old festival couldn't get enough of the scarecrow-stuffing workshop, which, for $8, supplied people with instructions, clothing, and enough straw to allow that first little pig in the fairy tale to build a condo."
NEWS
By Cindy Parr and Cindy Parr,Contributing Writer | October 9, 1992
This weekend, even if you don't mow the lawn or rake the leaves, do take the family out to the Carroll County Farm Museum to enjoy the 27th annual Fall Harvest Days.Tomorrow and Sunday, beginning at 10 a.m. and continuing to 5 p.m., a full menu of fall activities will be ripe for the picking.Scarecrow making, face painting, musical entertainment and seeing some of Carroll County's heaviest pumpkins are just a few events that can be enjoyed by every member of the family.Dottie Freeman, administrative marketing specialist for the Farm Museum, said this weekend's event is geared especially to pleasing the whole family.
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | June 28, 1993
American Indians used them. So did ancient Egyptians.And today, three Carroll County gardens sport brand-new ones made yesterday by children in a workshop at Piney Run Nature Center.They're called scarecrows -- or scarebirds, or scarevarmints -- because, if they're made right, they can frighten any critter out of your garden.Any critter except a groundhog,that is."The whole secret is to have something that moves on your scarecrow," said Elaine Sweitzer, park naturalist and chief scarecrow-stuffer.
NEWS
By NICK BROWN and NICK BROWN,SUN REPORTER | October 16, 2005
Tired of leaving Halloween decorating until the last minute, only to find a few grungy - or worse, mushy - pumpkins left at your local supermarket? Get a jump on it this time around - and make a day of it with a visit to an area pumpkin patch. This weekend and next are the best for pumpkin-picking. The squash are ripe and ready to be made into jack-o-lanterns, and while youre picking one out, you can also enjoy other fall activities at farms across Maryland. Paint your pumpkins - or your faces; go on hayrides; build scarecrows; snake your way through mazes - its more than just produce-picking.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | October 9, 2003
In Baltimore County Nature Center will hold its annual fall festival, PumpkinFest, on Saturday. The family event will run from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Attractions will include childrens crafts, games, scarecrow stuffing, animals, music and food. The nature center is at 8400 Greenspring Ave. Admission is $8 per car. Information: 410-484-2413.
NEWS
By Baltimore Sun staff | October 26, 2009
Officials destroyed a shipment of bunny scarecrows that recently arrived at the port of Baltimore after agricultural inspectors determined that the bamboo poles to which they were attached could contain harmful pathogens. The shipment from Hong Kong raised the concern of Customs and Border Protection agents working at the port, who are trained in biological sciences and agricultural inspection. Bamboo is regulated to prevent the spread of bamboo smut and other pathogens, officials said.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2009
The Talent Machine Company's July show, The Wiz, a retelling of L. Frank Baum's classic The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, is an excellent vehicle for the skills of the energetic young performers who make up the musical's cast. TMC is a family phenomenon rooted in the traditions of founder Bobbi Smith, who formed the company in 1987 to create a supportive environment for children as young as 5 to participate in polished musical theater performances. After Smith's death in January 2001, her sister, Vicki Smith, and her daughter, Lea Capps, continued the tradition.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | May 4, 2008
For one weekend at our middle school, the gymnasium becomes "backstage" and the cafeteria transforms into an auditorium. Thus, we are able to enjoy two nights of terrific theater -- this year's production of Oz based on the classic The Wizard of Oz; directed by a couple of either extremely patient or highly medicated volunteers. The weekend before the show, it was time to work on my son's costume as the Scarecrow. On Friday night, I distinctly remember saying to him during dinner: "Let's try to avoid the stress of rushing around on Sunday night, and get this project started first thing tomorrow morning."
NEWS
October 7, 2007
The Oakland Mills Community Association will hold its International Fall Festival from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, rain or shine, in Oakland Mills Village Center. Food, activities for children, crafts, health screenings, a foreign car display and other attractions are planned. Continuous entertainment includes the Kinderman, a Chinese Dragon dance, the Rhythm Drums Circle, Dean Turner Magician, Teelin Irish Dance Company, and others. Admission is free. Information: 410-730-4610. Scarecrow-making, hayrides planned Scarecrow-making and hayrides are planned at Amherst House in Kings Contrivance Village Center from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,sun reporter | October 14, 2006
It's the time of year when many of us take up Linus' quest and go in search of the Great Pumpkin. Unfortunately, late summer's drenching rains have made that quest a bit harder this year. "You're going to find your selection a little bit limited," said Dave Myers, extension agent in the Anne Arundel County office of the University of Maryland Cooperative Extension. The rains meant some pumpkins sat in soggy fields, causing their colors to fade and their stems to rot. As a result, supplies are "just adequate," Myers said.
NEWS
By NICK BROWN and NICK BROWN,SUN REPORTER | October 16, 2005
Tired of leaving Halloween decorating until the last minute, only to find a few grungy - or worse, mushy - pumpkins left at your local supermarket? Get a jump on it this time around - and make a day of it with a visit to an area pumpkin patch. This weekend and next are the best for pumpkin-picking. The squash are ripe and ready to be made into jack-o-lanterns, and while youre picking one out, you can also enjoy other fall activities at farms across Maryland. Paint your pumpkins - or your faces; go on hayrides; build scarecrows; snake your way through mazes - its more than just produce-picking.
NEWS
October 23, 1995
More than 80 artisans will sell their wares at the 1995 Downs Park Craft Fair from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday at the park on Mountain Road.From 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. there will be children's games at 25 cents a game; face painting; pumpkin painting at $1 a pumpkin; and scarecrow-making at $5 a scarecrow. A children's costume contest will begin at 1 p.m. at the amphitheater for three age categories.The Hot Jazz Orchestra will perform from noon to 2 p.m. A quilt raffle, sponsored by the Downs Park Quilters Guild, will be held at 3 p.m.Entrance to the park is free the day of the festival.
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