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NEWS
November 11, 2001
ANTI-TERRORISM efforts may have steeled U.S. borders to the drug trade, slashing the availability of narcotics on American streets. But Baltimore still leads the nation in heroin addiction. The result: a rash of killings as the scarcity of heroin and cocaine increases prices and heightens turf battles among rival dealers. Street slayings kept on surging last week, threatening to reverse a yearlong decline in killings. Except for a few lethal domestic quarrels, the murders were "all about drugs; not about drug money, but drugs," says Health Commissioner Peter Beilenson.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser and The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2014
Hiring by Maryland's largest employer — the federal government — has fallen by more than 40 percent nationally over four years, and the state's job market is feeling the pain. Years of tightening budgets have brought federal hiring to the lowest levels in at least a decade. And each month for more than a year, Maryland has posted a decrease in federal employment from the previous year, creating a drag on overall employment. The decline in federal jobs has been a major contributor to Maryland's spotty employment performance in recent months.
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NEWS
By Frank Roylance and Frank Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | November 6, 2009
Old-timers in Baltimore may recall a storm that dropped 6 inches on Nov. 6-7, 1953 - the earliest heavy snowstorm on record here. Snow froze on the streets, snarling traffic for up to five hours. Three busloads of Towson High students didn't get home until 10 p.m. Cars, buses and trolleys were stranded amid a scarcity of cinder and sand trucks. Robert Larabee Jr., 8, died in a wreck on the new Baltimore-Washington Parkway.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2012
For the second time in four years, there's a fight brewing in northern Baltimore County that raises questions about the scarcity of county-owned land for parks and schools. The school system is poised to approve building an elementary school on land it has owned for decades in Mays Chapel, currently the site of a park. But residents in the community, largely made up of retirees, say they don't want to give up the green, open space near their residences. With trailers lined up outside elementary schools in the area and enrollment projected to continue growing in the next five years, the system needs to build a school that can accommodate 700 students.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | January 31, 1996
Cheer up. House Republicans have restored government until the Ides of March.The National Reconnaissance Office can locate anything in the world except its own funds.Contrary to the behavior of other commodities, abundance rather than scarcity raises the price of garbage in Howard County.If he can play as well as before, at 36 after five years out of the game, that will be Magic.
NEWS
December 6, 1993
Two decades ago, Americans learned a painful lesson about their dependence on oil. But the gas lines that spurred new ways of thinking about natural resources will soon seem a mild prelude to other kinds of scarcities. Around the world, a number of countries are rapidly outgrowing their supplies of fresh water.A new report highlights the political, environmental and humanitarian threats posed by increasing competition for a finite supply of renewable water. It comes from Population Action International, a non-profit group concerned about population growth.
NEWS
December 25, 1999
Next wave?AS New Zealand goes, the world follows. In the recent elections, opposition leader Helen Clark displaced Prime Minister Jenny Shipley. A woman who, when a man, had been a prostitute, was elected to parliament.The point? New Zealand is leading the world into the Third Millennium.So this is the future?Too lateSOME hotels and restaurants may be lamenting a lack of New Year's Eve revelers, but there are few complaints these days from baby sitters, teenage or adult.The New York Times reports some sitters are charging as much as an astronomical $100 an hour, the rate fueled by scarcity.
NEWS
April 29, 2007
The scarcity of seaweed in the Chesapeake Bay is now a cause for alarm, a sign of an ecosystem out of balance. Back in April 1964, some saw seaweed in the Chesapeake Bay as an unsightly nuisance. The Sun reported that a woman named Pauline W. Remey complained to the county commission that "sea lettuce" on her bay properties caused noxious odors. A political merry-go-round ensued. The county board asked President Lyndon B. Johnson's administration what could be done about the problem.
NEWS
By George F. Will | December 17, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Fear has been called the aerobics of the mind. If that is so, all who think there can and should be an entitlement to economic security should tone up their minds by focusing on what is happening in the streets of French cities, and on what has happened on the streets where pickets walked for 17 months outside Caterpillar works in the United States.The future of all unreformed welfare states can be seen through the smoke from fires set by people protesting the French government's ''austerity'' plans, meaning plans to curtail entitlements to public jobs and benefits.
SPORTS
By CHILDS WALKER | March 14, 2006
More strategy talk as I and most of you prepare to draft in the next three weeks. I talked auction last week, so here's some theory on straight drafting. The first thing you want to do is rank all the players. If you're in a 12-team mixed league with 23 players on each roster, you should know the first 276 you'd take in the draft. You won't follow that list as gospel, but it will keep you from being caught off guard or losing perspective on a player's value. The key point to remember is a rather obvious one: You will not have a shot to acquire every player you want.
NEWS
By Frank Roylance and Frank Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | November 6, 2009
Old-timers in Baltimore may recall a storm that dropped 6 inches on Nov. 6-7, 1953 - the earliest heavy snowstorm on record here. Snow froze on the streets, snarling traffic for up to five hours. Three busloads of Towson High students didn't get home until 10 p.m. Cars, buses and trolleys were stranded amid a scarcity of cinder and sand trucks. Robert Larabee Jr., 8, died in a wreck on the new Baltimore-Washington Parkway.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun reporter | July 13, 2008
After four years of medical school and three years of internal medicine training, Jessica Colburn could have chosen just about any field of medicine to practice. Gastroenterology would have been lucrative, brain surgery exciting. At one point, pediatrics piqued her interest. But Colburn, 31, picked one of the least-popular areas of medicine to make her mark: geriatrics. "I've always loved old people," said Colburn, chief resident at the Johns Hopkins Bayview Internal Medicine Residency program.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | August 26, 2007
WAINWRIGHT, Alaska -- The Arctic sea ice in northwestern Alaska is usually within 30 miles of Wainwright in August. Today it's more than 300 miles away, much farther than it has ever been. Wainwright hunters have usually bagged more than 100 walruses by this time in the season. They've bagged fewer than 20 this year. The ice left Wainwright so quickly in June -- a month earlier than usual -- that Oliver Peetook didn't have the chance to get a walrus. Like most Wainwright families, the Peetooks -- Oliver has four children -- usually fill the freezer with three or four of them, butchering the animals on the ice where they've been shot.
NEWS
April 29, 2007
The scarcity of seaweed in the Chesapeake Bay is now a cause for alarm, a sign of an ecosystem out of balance. Back in April 1964, some saw seaweed in the Chesapeake Bay as an unsightly nuisance. The Sun reported that a woman named Pauline W. Remey complained to the county commission that "sea lettuce" on her bay properties caused noxious odors. A political merry-go-round ensued. The county board asked President Lyndon B. Johnson's administration what could be done about the problem.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,Sun Reporter | January 21, 2007
WASHINGTON-- After nearly four years of war in Iraq, the Pentagon's effort to protect its troops against roadside bombs is in disarray, with soldiers and Marines having to swap access to scarce armored vehicles and the military unsure whether it has the money or industrial capacity to produce the safe vehicles it says the troops need. On Jan. 10, The Sun reported that most of the 21,500 troops President Bush has ordered to Iraq as reinforcements will not have access to specialized blast-resistant armored vehicles because they are in such short supply.
SPORTS
By CHILDS WALKER | March 14, 2006
More strategy talk as I and most of you prepare to draft in the next three weeks. I talked auction last week, so here's some theory on straight drafting. The first thing you want to do is rank all the players. If you're in a 12-team mixed league with 23 players on each roster, you should know the first 276 you'd take in the draft. You won't follow that list as gospel, but it will keep you from being caught off guard or losing perspective on a player's value. The key point to remember is a rather obvious one: You will not have a shot to acquire every player you want.
SPORTS
By DAN CONNOLLY and DAN CONNOLLY,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2005
It took more than 18 months, but Mike Hargrove finally got the four victories he needed to reach the 1,000-win milestone in his managerial career. When the Orioles fired him at the end of the 2003 season, Hargrove was stuck on win No. 996. His fourth as the manager of the Seattle Mariners came Wednesday, a 2-1 win over the Royals. He joked afterward that if all of his wins had been as close as that one, "I'd be dead." Hargrove began his managerial career in 1991 with Cleveland and won 721 games with the Indians before being dismissed in 1999.
NEWS
By JAMIE SMITH HOPKINS and JAMIE SMITH HOPKINS,SUN REPORTER | January 25, 2006
Memo to job seekers: Your time appears to have come. Maryland just concluded its best year of job growth since the heady days of the technology boom, according to U.S. Labor Department numbers released yesterday, and local economists are predicting that 2006 will be as good or better. The jobless rate dropped to 3.9 percent last month, so low that some experts dub it "full employment." Several counties - such as affluent Howard - are hovering around 3 percent. More and more employers say they are facing worker shortages.
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