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SPORTS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2013
Major League Baseball has gone to great pains to move past its so-called steroid era, which gripped the game for more than a decade and stained the reputations of many of its greatest players. But nearly six years after the release of the Mitchell Report, which was designed to put an end to that period, baseball is again shadowed by a drug scandal that has fans and analysts wondering if the problem can ever be stamped out. About 20 players, including former Most Valuable Players Alex Rodriguez and Ryan Braun, could face suspensions of up to 100 games based on their dealings with the Biogenesis clinic in South Florida, according to an ESPN report.
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NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Sun Staff Writer | April 12, 1994
A cheating scandal that has harmed the reputation of the U.S. Naval Academy now appears to be threatening the career of its superintendent, Rear Adm. Thomas C. Lynch.The two-star admiral -- who admitted "failure" in not aggressively pursuing the largest scandal in academy history -- is now being offered two-star assignments rather than the three-star promotion he had hoped to achieve, Navy and Pentagon sources said.Admiral Lynch, 52, a 1964 academy graduate and former Navy football captain, was yearning for a fleet command and is now deciding whether to accept a deputy post or retire from the Navy, sources said.
NEWS
By Ann Egerton | November 18, 1991
SCANDAL: The Culture of Mistrust in American Politics. By Suzanne Garment. Times Books. 304 pages. $23.5/8 HOW HANDY that after 45 years of worrying about the Soviet menace, we can now relax! Now, instead of looking for communists under the bed, we can sniff out scandals.According to Suzanne Garment, a former columnist for the Wall Street Journal and a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute in Washington, scandals are as American as apple pie and come in all varieties -- political, financial and sexual being the most prevalent -- sometimes with the delicious mix of two or all three.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 14, 2002
Cardinal William H. Keeler will meet today with at least 165 of his priests for a "listening session" to hear their thoughts and concerns about the clergy sex abuse scandal that has rocked the U.S. Catholic Church. The meeting at St. Mary's Seminary & University in Roland Park will be closed to the public, but Keeler said he will address the media afterward. He said wants to hear from priests about how the crisis is affecting them and their parishes. The cardinal said he will use the input to refine the child sex abuse policy in the Archdiocese of Baltimore and to help form a national policy.
NEWS
January 22, 1998
The Chicago Tribune said in an editorial Sunday:LAST WEEK, THESE events made news:Whitewater prosecutor Kenneth Starr visited the White House to gather sworn testimony from first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton. It was the fifth time Mrs. Clinton has testified in the investigation.President Clinton gave a deposition in the civil suit brought by Paula Jones, who has accused him of exposing himself and making ''odious, perverse and outrageous'' sexual advances to her in 1991.Labor Secretary Alexis Herman denied she has sold her influence in the White House, an allegation that is being investigated by the Justice Department.
NEWS
By Joel Greenberg and Joel Greenberg,Chicago Tribune | October 5, 2006
JERUSALEM -- During the Jewish holiday of Sukkot next week, President Moshe Katsav is scheduled to hold an open house at his official residence to greet the public. A few days later, he is to preside over the opening of the winter session of the Israeli parliament. But the normally festive events are expected to be awkward affairs, because Katsav is under police investigation for suspected sexual harassment and the possible rape of a former secretary in his residence. For years considered a colorless "Mr. Clean," Katsav, 61, is at the center of a scandal that has tainted the presidency, a ceremonial post that is the highest office in Israel and whose holder represents the nation in official functions at home and abroad.
NEWS
By Robert C. McFarlane | September 19, 1991
TAXPAYERS no doubt hope that after a government scandal has been investigated and "steps" have been taken, the system will somehow work better. In the case of the Iran-contra scandal, that hasn't happened. Indeed, there is a strong basis for believing that none of the so-called corrective organisms of the system have worked, and that the relationship of comity, so essentialto effective functioning of our political system, has been further eroded.As matters stand, the central issue in this episode -- how the shared responsibilities for the conduct of foreign policy ought to be divided between the presidency and the Congress -- has not been seriously joined, at least not by the presidency; the central decision-maker of the scandal -- former President Reagan -- has not been held to account; and the institution established to deter, or to police, wrongdoing -- the independent counsel -- will likely end up discredited.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | April 26, 1992
Washington. -- The House banking affair is more a debacle than a scandal, involving more ineptitude than peculation. But as some members of Congress try to mollify constituents, they demonstrate the really scandalous side of modern government.Consider two Georgians, Charles Hatcher, a six-term Democrat from a mostly rural district, and Newt Gingrich, an eight-term Republican from suburban Atlanta.Mr. Hatcher, author of 819 overdrafts, was listed among the 22 worst abusers. But is he in trouble back home?
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Staff Writer | January 13, 1994
With some 125 midshipmen expected to be implicated in the U.S. Naval Academy's largest cheating scandal, the academy's superintendent yesterday named three retired admirals to help determine what type of discipline should be handed out.Rear Admiral Thomas C. Lynch said at a news conference that the admirals -- all former academy officials -- would provide "fairness and consistency" and not "overburden the midshipmen" who rule on violations of the school's strict...
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Sun Staff Writer | June 10, 1994
The Naval Academy's No. 2 official had his promotion to rear admiral put on hold this week, because of Senate concerns about his role in the investigation of the school's largest cheating scandal.Navy Secretary John Dalton asked the Senate Armed Services Committee to delay considering the promotion of Capt. John B. Padgett, the Naval Academy's commandant of midshipmen, who was among an estimated 30 nominees considered for promotion to rear admiral.Mr. Dalton took the step to make sure the other officers on the list were acted on by the committee, which approved the nominees this week, said Capt.
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