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NEWS
December 23, 1990
The scandal surrounding the Maryland State Games, which received some $1 million in state funds, raises troubling questions about the stewardship of health secretary Adele Wilzack. Charges from legislators of "blatant mismanagement," "rampant nepotism" and "abuse of funds" will be hard to rebut. This could become a big embarrassment for the Schaefer administration.While it is commendable that Ms. Wilzack acted swiftly to straighten out this situation once problems surfaced, it does not explain why she strongly supported this program for two years when the objectives of the Maryland State Games -- holding an annual amateur competition and trying to lure the U.S. Olympic Festival to Maryland -- are far removed from her department's activities.
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NEWS
By Crispin Sartwell | November 27, 1998
AS THE mind-numbing Lewinsky scandal winds finally to its anticlimax, it is getting to be time for an ethical debriefing. Everyone involved needs to engage in some serious self-reflection, and I have some suggestions as to the shape that self-reflection should take for each of the major players.President Clinton needs to do some soul searching, if he has not already. He needs to ask himself what things are really most important to him. He needs to ask himself whether he is an addict, and if so whether he wants to get some treatment.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | August 4, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Ah, justice! How wondrously do its wheels spin! On one hand, a president gets acquitted by the Senate after lying to a grand jury and being found in contempt of court for giving a false deposition. On the other, a common citizen who complains about senatorial foot-dragging in the trial against that president faces six months in the slammer and a $500 fine.This strange confluence of events culminated the other day with the federal judge in the Paula Jones case ordering President Clinton to reimburse her lawyers and others for about $90,000 in expenses, and then a jury convicting a man of disrupting Congress by shouting from the Senate gallery.
NEWS
By Frank Del Olmo | April 6, 1995
THE CENTRAL Intelligence Agency is getting most of the heat for the latest human-rights outrage to emerge from the ugly little wars that continue to plague Central America. It should, since one of the spy agency's Guatemalan "assets" has been implicated in the brutal murders of a U.S. citizen and the Guatemalan husband of another U.S. citizen. But the CIA is not the only culprit.A little-known Pentagon operation that trains Latin American military officers also has blood on its hands in this latest tragedy.
NEWS
June 15, 2011
The sex lives of American presidents, all the way back to Thomas Jefferson, were not front-page news, as they would be today. The private lives of presidents and other public officials made for gossip among Washington insiders but were not considered the general public's business. And when — and if — America ever gets over its schizophrenic attitude toward sex and the human body, things like the current Anthony Weiner scandal will be non-stories. I had a chat, years ago, with an acquaintance of mine who worked with politicos in D.C., and she observed that some of the most idealistic, talented and otherwise decent politicians are also philanderers.
NEWS
June 21, 2013
Commentator Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s recent column on the IRS scandal shows once again why he was twice defeated for governor of Maryland ("IRS scandal is worse than the others," June 16). He begins his weekly tirade by referring to a "hot dog" as someone who makes "the most outrageous statements of the day" - a spot on self-description. Mr. Ehrlich then does his best Rep. Darrell Issa imitation by loosely tying President Barack Obama to the latest IRS scandal before congressional hearings have been completed and before all testimony has been released.
NEWS
September 27, 2014
Regarding the Ray Rice scandal, Ravens president Dick Cass said in the team's rebuttal to an ESPN article critical of the team that he "did not think that pretrial intervention would prevent the [second] video from becoming public. I assumed that would eventually occur in any event" ( "Steve Bisciotti, Ravens issue rebuttal to ESPN report," Sept. 22). Yet he says he declined to request a copy of the second video, which shows Mr. Rice punching his then-fiancee, Janay Palmer. Let's think about this: The president of an NFL franchise knows there's an incendiary video out there that could very well embroil his franchise in a firestorm.
NEWS
July 1, 2014
The recent passing of Howard Baker provides significant contrasts as to how scandals are dealt with today ("Notable deaths elsewhere," June 27). Forty years ago, this country was engulfed in the monumental scandal of Watergate. What was initially proclaimed to be a third-rate burglary turned into a constitutional crisis that ultimately resulted in the resignation of a disgraced President Richard Nixon. This was due to the efforts of many people, but a substantial factor in the outcome was the persistence and skill of Howard Baker, a Republican senator from Tennessee.
NEWS
By Mark Puente, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
After serving eight months in federal custody for his role in a towing scandal, former Baltimore police officer David Reeping is fighting to get his job back. Reeping contends that investigators used him as a scapegoat to avoid accusations of racial profiling from Hispanic and African-American officers convicted in the scandal, according to a complaint filed with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. "I was the token 'Caucasian' to stack the deck against them," Reeping told the commission, according to a copy of the claim obtained by The Baltimore Sun. A city lawyer called Reeping's allegations "absurd" and urged the commission to reject the claim, according to his correspondence with the commission.
NEWS
July 19, 2011
When you cheat, they tell kids in school, you only cheat yourself, but in Baltimore, we've recently learned that's not always true. Sometimes you also cheat the students you're supposed to be teaching when you change the answers on their state standardized tests, and even worse, sometimes you cheat victims of heart attacks, strokes or traumas when you get inside information about the exam to become an emergency medical technician. School officials and the top commanders at the fire department are fretting that their respective cheating scandals will damage public trust in their institutions, and that is certainly true, but the cumulative effect casts a pall on the entire city.
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